Fannie Mae Reviews in Washington, DC | Glassdoor

Fannie Mae Washington DC Reviews

Updated December 14, 2017
500 reviews

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Washington, DC Area

3.6
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500 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Latest Reorg making people crazy"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Program Manager in Reston, VA
    Current Employee - Senior Program Manager in Reston, VA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Fannie Mae full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Management is interested in improving and enhancing the way the organization is structured to allow people more freedom
    Allows employees to try and fail without repercussions

    Cons

    Often it feels like change for the sake of change

    Advice to Management

    Stop comparing us to companies like Spotify and Amazon. Our products are different, our way of working is different, and our culture is very different. Just because those companies are successful does not mean that we need to manage ourselves the same way they do.

    Change should have a purpose. It doesn't feel like mgmt aligns that purpose with our corporate direction.


  2. "Sr. Architect"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Technical Architect in Reston, VA
    Current Employee - Senior Technical Architect in Reston, VA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Fannie Mae full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Great Learning Environment , flexibility in work hours , good Pay and Perks , work -life balance

    Cons

    No technical growth Path after a level

    Advice to Management

    Performance management system needs to be fixed to encourage people

  3. "Financial Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Financial Analyst in Washington, DC
    Current Contractor - Financial Analyst in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Fannie Mae as a contractor (More than a year)

    Pros

    Pay. Workload. Co-worker. Culture. Holidays

    Cons

    Nothing to complaint except for improving IT department's efficiency

    Advice to Management

    Keep it going!


  4. "Becoming better every day"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Finance Associate in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Finance Associate in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Fannie Mae full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    *Salary
    *Vacation
    *Benefits
    *Engaging company and they offer many different ways to support employees

    Cons

    *Very large and can be impersonal
    *Don't promote with in as much

    Advice to Management

    Keep pursuing and developing young talent. Keep encouraging collaboration


  5. "Fanniemae - great place to work!!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Salesforce Developer in Reston, VA
    Current Contractor - Salesforce Developer in Reston, VA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Fannie Mae as a contractor (More than a year)

    Pros

    Healthy competitive environment - lots to learn

    Cons

    nothing on the top of my mind


  6. "Fannie Mae"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Fannie Mae full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Good benefits, assistance house financing, and very good people.

    Cons

    None, best company in Washington, DC


  7. "Fannie Mae Summer Intern Review"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Intern - Hourly in Washington, DC
    Former Intern - Intern - Hourly in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Fannie Mae as an intern (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -Great project managers
    -Chill and relaxed work environment
    -The pay was good for me as a summer intern

    Cons

    -Cafeteria doesn't have too many choices
    -Location in DC isn't very easy to get to and park

    Advice to Management

    I felt very accommodated for as an intern. My only advice would be to make sure all the lights and AC work right in the old DC building.

  8. "IT Service Delivery"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - IT Service Delivery in Arlington, VA
    Former Employee - IT Service Delivery in Arlington, VA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Fannie Mae full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Good benefits, Diverse culture, Flexible Working Schedules, Salary is competitive

    Cons

    Takes too long to implement any changes. Outsourcing IT platforms was a disaster to Service Levels.


  9. Helpful (1)

    "Not for everyone"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Product Designer in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Product Designer in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Fannie Mae full-time

    Pros

    Compensation and certain team members.

    Cons

    Mortgage industry subject-matter expertise is respected more than domain or discipline expertise. The organization has too many lifers who are unwilling to adapt or change. It takes forever to get critical software approved and you are expected to be grateful for what they can provide for you. You have limited resources as a designer to do your best work, especially when you are being asked to compromise research for the sake of shipping products.

    Half of the company doesn't even know Fannie Mae has an internal design team, which results in duplicative projects all over the organization that may not even address the real needs of customers. Research is not respected and insights are too biased to be useful. They have product owners who used to be business analysts and they have no idea what they are doing. There are too many cooks in the kitchen on projects and designers have the last seat at the table, if at all. The organization has huge silos within silos and no one communicates. It is VERY hierarchical and executives are more like dictators. They expect designers to be magicians who will help the organization become more customer-centered, but they are unwilling to set them up for success.

    The issues within the organization are systemic and deeply ingrained in the culture, and it will take a LONG time to establish the conditions necessary for the culture to shift. Some of the senior leaders are incredibly arrogant, direct and impersonal, and the culture can feel very bureaucratic, regimented, and lacklustre at times.

    Advice to Management

    Hire leaders who have a track record of growing design teams with mutual respect, empathy and vision. Get rid of egomaniacs, empire-builders and status-quo lifers on the management team - it's toxic for everyone.

    SLOW DOWN and focus on building out the foundation of a team before you get carried away with the size of your team or the number of projects. Treat employees with respect and value quality over quantity. Don't embellish your successes. Be real and honest with the team about the challenges ahead, and provide a clear mission and vision for what you're all working toward, why and how.


  10. "Human Capital Planning - who can we lay off?"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Director in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Director in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Fannie Mae full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Benefits, compensation, work life balance

    Cons

    Continually changing priorities and approaches has the firm in a constant state of flux. Much is said about a human capital plan, which may sound impressive but is essentailly a constant re-evaluation of who could be expendable. Another buzz phrase is shape shifting, which boils down to replacing more senior middle management with lower cost staff. The CIO actually stated that employees should consider a 18 month tenure a good run in the "current environment". Below the officer (VP) level the constant churn is discomforting. At the VP level and above the brain drain is on. If stability is important this isn't the place for you.

    After 9 years of conservetorship parallel business plans are about to collide. The Obama administration planned on winding Fannie down with a plan of bringing the capital position to zero by Jan. 2018. Not only is Fannie still in place, it's delivering billions of dollars to Treasure each year. Those dollars are generated from gaurantee fees collected on qualifying mortgages to cover losses related to loan defaults: essentially insurance. But all of the money collected in fees is transferred quarterly to the US Treasury, so there'll no capital to cover related losses. As a result, Fannie Mae would need to draw from Treasury to cover quarterly losses. This is exacerbated by a lower than 35% Corporate Tax rate. Fannie Mae is still writing off losses, but the writeoffs assumed a 35% tax rate. A rate any lower decreases the value of the write-offs, which increases Fannie's tax liability. With no capital in 2018 there's no money to pay higher taxes.

    Advice to Management

    The aspirations or human capital planning are commendable. But the current plan coupled with the annual employee survey runs counter to what employees see happening.


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