Five Acres Reviews | Glassdoor

Five Acres Reviews

Updated November 19, 2017
25 reviews

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25 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Clinician"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Mental Health Clinician in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Mental Health Clinician in Los Angeles, CA
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Five Acres full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Lots of opportunities within the agency, they prefer to promote internally. It is a great place to learn about therapy, especially with kids and families.

    Cons

    Lots of hours and tons of DMH paperwork. It is easy for things to fall through the cracks and you will never fully catch up.


  2. "Know what you're getting into"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at Five Acres full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Great staff, free lunch, good benefits

    Cons

    Toxic environment working with extremely difficult clientele, underpaid, poor training, very draining job with long hours

    Advice to Management

    Emphasize the severity of the clients (level 12 facility), provide better training BEFORE staff starts work

  3. "Turnover of staff extremely high across agency"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Clinician
    Current Employee - Clinician
    Doesn't Recommend

    I have been working at Five Acres full-time

    Pros

    The individuals that I work with and alongside are outstanding! They are great people who genuinely care about others and make work much more enjoyable. I have made some good friends through this agency. Some supervisors have been wonderful and understanding.

    Cons

    Senior Leadership consistently demands unrealistic productivity standards regardless of tremendous feedback and extremely high turnover. Families have been through multiple therapists in a short period of time. This has been disheartening and disruptive to their therapy, which feels unethical at times. You will feel like a slave to a few at the top who are clearly removed from the work, and be exhausted, underpaid, and unappreciated. Clinicians are seen as sales persons and the focus is on the revenue, not client care. Senior Leadership ("SLT") does not seem to care about the wellness of their employees, although they say otherwise. Actions speak louder than words. Their actions, unfortunately, are punitive, and keep this organization from thriving.

    Advice to Management

    Please make real change to keep the great people that you have, rather than let so many go again and again due to the excessive productivity expectations. Your staff has provided so much feedback at your request to that end, and you continue to ignore them. Families are starting to go with other organizations because they are tired of losing their therapists. Your policies, expectations, and punitive approach make it difficult to sustain the work over time. This is a great shame. How many more great people need to leave for you to get it?


  4. Helpful (1)

    "Clinicians unseen, unheard, and unappreciated"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Clinician
    Former Employee - Clinician
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Five Acres full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Great training on DMH documentation as well as other training opportunities available if you advocate for yourself. Pay is about 2-3 thousand more than other DMH agencies.

    Cons

    Firstly, as a new clinician to Five Acres you will receive suffocating supervisor micromanagement. I received very little clinical supervision and more supervision on successful completion of paperwork and making sure I met productivity. You are acknowledged solely by meeting your productivity, timeliness, and QA audits. That is what is rewarded and acknowledged at group meetings. Furthermore, other clinicians can see your productivity on a graph which establishes a shame-based working environment. By upper management as a clinician you are clearly seen as a number and you will have little to zero relationship with the leaders of this company. If you thrive in a team-based working environment, stay clear of Five Acres. I fought vigorously to communicate to management these issues at play and frankly it appears as though they do not want to receive constructive feedback. The work clinicians are encouraged to do is to meet billing standards and there is very little focus on work that comes from the heart -- to serve those in need of heart-based work. The clinician turnover is astounding and supervisors excuse is that while an intern, it is "typical" to look for other experiences. The fact that clinicians do not stay or start looking for other jobs about 6 months into work would NEVER happen if clinicians felt valued and seen.

    Advice to Management

    Clinicians who feel valued and appreciated, who feel like what they do makes a difference, will feel invigorated to push harder to achieve success for their company. But unfortunately this is not the case and so clinicians are burnt out and in turn this affects the quality of care clients receive. SLT, this means getting from behind your desk and having a relationship with the clinicians who honestly are the reason Five Acres can continue to receive funding. You have to show up and communicate directly with staff. Surveys DO NOT equal a relationship. Successful leadership is built on the people around you. Team building is essential to leading a diverse and unique group of people with distinct personalities, motivations and skills. Strong teams and teamwork are key to achieving many of things such as fostering innovation, effective communication and achieving your organization’s goals. If you recruit and develop the right team, you will be creating an unstoppable force that will keep amazing clinicians around for the long haul.


  5. "Wonderful work culture"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Pasadena, CA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Pasadena, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at Five Acres full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The agency focuses on what is most important which are the children and the impact they make in their lives. The focus on mission and permanency is clear. The leadership team is engaged with the workforce and cares about the quality of work.

    Cons

    This work is not for everyone. Staff that can't to do the work should realize it's not for them and leave versus complain.

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the good work!


  6. "Group Leader"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Dimas, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Dimas, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at Five Acres part-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    They are trying to stay ahead of the curve in the field. Staff are committed. The work is very meaningful and rewarding.

    Cons

    Limited resources creates a trickle down effect that creates hardship for further growth. Leadership can be disconnected and create standards that cannot be met.


  7. "Has potential- needs "leadership" overhaul"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Social Worker in El Monte, CA
    Current Employee - Social Worker in El Monte, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Five Acres full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    This organization puts on big expensive parties for staff and has a lot of money to use on marketing which attracts higher income families

    Cons

    Poor compensation, inadequate Human Resources support, wasteful with donations and state funding, while at the same time stingy about providing necessary supports to committed staff to manage their unreasonable workloads

    Advice to Management

    Speak with line staff about the integrity of their superordinates (honesty, commitment, support, adherence to agency's stated values)

  8. "Okay for social service industry"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I have been working at Five Acres full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Flexibility, autonomy, middle of the road pay (relative to other companies)

    Cons

    Unrealistic productivity, insufficient training, low pay (objectively)

    Advice to Management

    More on the job training to assure staff competency


  9. "Review"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Five Acres full-time

    Pros

    Five Acres is a great organisation. My bests to them.

    Cons

    I choose not to say anything negative at this time.

    Advice to Management

    I choose not to say anything about management at this time.


  10. Helpful (2)

    "The same as the rest"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Clinician
    Former Employee - Clinician
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    Pros

    The people, the clients, as laid back about DMH paperwork as an agency can be at this point. Good ancillary support if you know who to ask. Some great supervisors. Benefits are cheap if you go with Kaiser, otherwise pretty standard. If you are a clinical, if you do your work and meet your numbers you will be pretty autonomous which had value.
    Individual departments do try and build communication and team work.
    HR, finance, IT do help and are orderly and quick.
    Better pay than the smaller agencies worse than some.

    Cons

    This Agency used to be a crown jewel of non profit mental health. Management has decided to turn it into a corporation which is fine, but they murdered the heart of the place in doing so.
    The residential unit is corrupt and not designed to help the children at all, although I have heard they are cracking down on abusive staff and trying to actually help the children.
    The life of a therapist here is the same as at any DMH agency. Overworked and underpaid. The people can be wonderful but in general morale is decimated.
    Management is semi morally bankrupt and make decisions without actually knowing what they are doing.
    They definitely Play favorites in regards to promotion. Senior Management is petty and does not like to be questioned.
    Service area is enormous you could be driving a lot but you get paid for it.

    Advice to Management

    Respect your licensed staff. Provide real clinical focused training. Actually care about the disposition of service. Recognize that quality of care brings in more repeat business than expensive ad campaigns and personal fame. Go back to being a non profit and not your launching pad for careers as CEOs somewhere else.


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