Florida Power & Light Principal Engineer Reviews | Glassdoor

Florida Power & Light Principal Engineer Reviews

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Principal Engineer

2.6
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Florida Power & Light President and CEO James Robo
James Robo
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Pros
  • Good benefits very family oriented (in 23 reviews)

  • Benefits, salary and they care about work life balance (in 10 reviews)

Cons
  • Long hours/work life balance could be better (in 23 reviews)

  • Employees have to work long hours in order to keep up with projects, requests and demands (in 5 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Principal Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Principal Engineer
    Current Employee - Principal Engineer
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook

    Pros

    Relatively secure, layoff free environment

    Cons

    Current atmosphere of austerity. Few new and interesting projects. Just maintaining assets as is with little innovation or improvement.

    Advice to Management

    Adopt PMI project management processes and throw out in use project methods


  2. Helpful (2)

    "Pincipal Software Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Principal Software Engineer in Jupiter, FL
    Former Employee - Principal Software Engineer in Jupiter, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Florida Power & Light full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The IM worker bees and operations folks are some of the nicest people you could hope to meet.
    Salaries are decent, but not exceptional.
    Benefits are decent, but not exceptional, especially for a large company.

    Cons

    IT management has no compunctions regarding lying or obfuscating - everything from the specifics of why they are hiring you, to non-existent "regulatory filing deadlines" that drive your delivery schedule to guarantee that you work 50-70 hours a week.

    IM management also has no compunctions about ignoring the lies of their contractors when it meets their political goals. I was tail-end charlie in the delivery cycle of my last project, i.e. the app developer, as opposed to the contract business analyst or the contract Java developer responsible for a nightmare of an external Oracle database for which they insisted writing a ridiculous interface. This meant the lies by the contract PM to the effect that all his firm's contract employees delivered on-time/on-schedule made the contractor and the group manager look good (or at least, not bad) - and put me working seven days a week for a month. I could live with the OT, but not with the self-serving lies by the contractor, or the lack of repercussions. Nor with the drones in management who neither plan, nor manage projects, nor have any knowledge about the business or the technologies that they should understand as a core part of their job description.

    Salary reviews are a joke - you get a salary increase, your "bonus" takes a hit. Get a big bonus, your annual increase takes a hit. I had two direct managers as an FPL employee, and both of them admitted that they have a "bucket of budget", and never have as much salary/bonus money as what their team deserved .

    FPL IM has a lot of reorg activity - three downsizing cycles in the two years I was an FPL employee. Every time there was a downsizing, I lost people on my team.

    All of the above explains why almost. half of the group I was in (and all of the real senior technical talent) chose to seek "other opportunities". Ask the one who are left why they don't leave, and the common responses are either, "Because I am not yet vested", "Because I almost have the time required to retire with free health insurance', to "Because I can't find anything else in this area."

    Advice to Management

    Try to stop squeezing blood from a turnip - eliminating employees who actually do 'work' and keeping an IM management structure that does no work related to projects other than occasionally (rarely, in some cases) attend project meetings, but broadcast numerous congratulatory emails to one another when the one FPL employee actually WORKING on the project delivers the code to production with zero defects found in the first few months of production - but that engineer is just considered to be "doing his job".

    Also not terribly smart to "replace" that single employee after they leave with three offshore contract engineers, a part-time PM, one part-time FPL IM employee to explain requirements to the offshore engineers and smoke-test the code they produce, often returning it to them immediately because of bugs in the new code or regressions in the existing code. And a part-time business analyst - all to "replace" one employee.

    What would the ratepayers say?