GE Healthcare Software Engineer Reviews | Glassdoor

GE Healthcare Software Engineer Reviews

Updated Dec 18, 2019

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3.6
74%
Recommend to a Friend
66%
Approve of CEO
GE Healthcare President and CEO Kieran Murphy (no image)
Kieran Murphy
22 Ratings
  1. Helpful (1)

    "empowering"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Software Engineer in Milwaukee, WI
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at GE Healthcare

    Pros

    Company empowers employees, offers great challenges, a good place for thought leaders. Excellent training opportunities.

    Cons

    Complex processes make it challenging to do work

    Continue reading
    GE Healthcare2016-03-22
  2. "Good work-life balance, but little behind in technology"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Chicago, IL
    Recommends

    I have been working at GE Healthcare full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    good compensation, work life balance, permissive leaves. If your are lucky and her into good project which works on latest tech stack it's like super cake. But in general health care would be little behind in tech stack.

    Cons

    old technology, too much of process due to nature of work which serves to hospital.

    GE Healthcare2019-12-18
  3. Helpful (2)

    "Where Passion Goes to Die"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Waukesha, WI
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at GE Healthcare full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Impactful work. Nice people. Diverse crowd of laid back Midwestern types (in the Milwaukee area specifically.) Mix of stereotypical geeks and people with other interests. The Waukesha x-ray software director genuinely wants to foster a more modern software engineering environment and empower people to innovate and collaborate, though the culture doesn't empower those who share this mindset to channel it.

    Cons

    The Waukesha x-ray software team, director included, was recently placed under a a director in Bangalore, India who has been cutting syphoning work from Waukesha to Bangalore and wants to prove the Milwaukee team irrelevant. This kind of off shoring with US teams working under international managers with negligent quality standards and a desire to only work on stuff that makes a sexy demo, however duck taped together, is common. The Waukesha team was literally recreated to solve quality issues due to outsourcing x-ray in the first place, yet was placed under the people who caused the problem. While my personal interactions with coworkers in Waukesha and Bangalore including the aforementioned Bangalore director have generally been positive and many people including him have gone out of their way to help me at times, so I don't want to knock them too bad, the Bangalore culture of working hard without taking time to find ways to work smarter has been percolating to Waukesha. Agile estimates are a joke and they're debating abandoning Agile altogether. Most teams are siloed and though many people are helpful, team leads (architects who double as product owners and team leads who don't usually have much time to help engineers yet find time to micromanage and who shape the actual boss' opinion of engineers with their super biased and unrealistic opinions) usually see time spent helping others as time wasted, so though several of my teammates were collaborative, they felt pressured to focus entirely on their individual tasks, which was all they're evaluated on rather than the team commitment. Contractors, mostly from India, who make up 75% of the team report to another manager who reports to the director so he's even more distanced from their needs. Competing programs with program managers who are evaluated on how much they can get done for their programs rather than their contribution to the priorities and goals of the department put pressure on these team leads who respond by increasing the teams' velocity with no discussion of how to reach these targets besides "work harder." I mean clearly we're slackers when Bangalore people literally work 24/7. While I was passionate about the work and willing to put in some overtime now and then, I found it inappropriate and discriminatory when I was putting in 60 hours a week and my team lead and subsequently my boss told me that since I'm single, my career should be my focus. When I responded that I was working about 60 hours they said it wasn't enough. While I have no bad blood towards them (I really don't and understand your perspective in case you ever read this) but I wish I'd had the guts to tell them in person how I've struggled ever since grad school with people assuming I have no needs of my own and expecting I always have room to do more for them, with no idea how many others were demanding the same with no regard for my well-being. While I understand that some people have harder lives than me, I still have responsibilities and needs outside of work. Plus, that's just an incredibly disrespectful way to look at single people. I don't need to be validated by a partner for my time to be worth respecting. I am an end in myself. It's Wisconsin. Most people are happy to go the extra mile if you just ask nicely, but so many of my coworkers, many of them visa restricted contractors, put up with this kind of disrespect until you're seen as a problem if you want to be treated like a human being. These were the same people who were always willing to lend a hand with little things, always polite, good people who do good things for society and and outside work. The culture had just gotten so toxic that such comments were accepted as normal. Some people also seem to have an old fashioned attitude towards women, mostly the innocent "ladies first" but I can sense some subtle bias against fun-loving, independent young women. No, this isn't a description of myself parading as a category but a based on comments I've heard and behaviors I've witnessed. On the extreme side, I went to a work event shortly after joining GE and stayed pretty late ~9:30. I was enjoying networking and hanging out with people on other teams when some 40 year old man (I'm 24) I was discussing our career backgrounds with kisses me on the cheek out of the blue. This was an isolated incident and HR dealt with it very professional - 0 tolerance policy. There one thing I felt iffy about was HR telling my manager. As a new employee I didn't want to be judged, though after dealing with plenty of harassment in school, I've developed enough passion for gender equality that I would've fought the fight if it came to that, but I know some women feel immense amounts of shame about something society really needs to understand isn't their fault. I wasn't going to bring this incident up since it was isolated until I realized there might be a sublte climate of some people judging others' lives - live in couples, same sex couples, women staying out late etc. That said, there are plenty of very progressive people as well and people generally keep their biases to themselves, though most of the more progressive people tend to not stay long with, along those with modern Engineering mindsets, though the American dream mentality isn't respected either, so I guess everyone is judged equally. While the silo life appeals to some, our systems are deeply coupled with legacy code (C++ 98,) which leads to an immense learning curve, increased by a culture lacking knowledge sharing. People cope with the pressure by keeping system knowledge and environment tricks to themselves, anything to get ahead of the constant sense of inadequacy. While the Waukesha director encourages knowledge sharing, most people are under too much constant pressure to "work harder" to invest in improving their process or bother learning about anything besides the tasks at hand, which they understandably choose based on their narrow areas of expertise. So 90% of process improvements and knowledge sharing efforts leave with the new blood. All that persists is the subteam leads' ridiculous expectations for new engineers to contribute independently as the level of seasoned team members after 3 months when onboarding is essentially non-existent and what little support you do get, you only get for the first subteam you get placed on. Switching subteams means a whole new mountain of legacy code and expectations to perform at veteran level after 2 weeks. When this method of nonboarding didn't work, they let go of several new hires during the recent lay-off, a stunt to make profits look good on paper. GE lays off entire teams at the drop of a hat to shift work across locales. It doesn't help that they're located in a renter unfriendly area where few apartments let you terminate your lease. They give great severance though. Though leaders sometimes ask for input from new engineers, the input is often met with "wait your turn" type talk or tense relationships later. While a good early career resume booster, I wouldn't recommend GE for your first job out of college or a long career. Your first job out of college is a unique opportunity to be mentored and learn industry standards, which you won't get at GE and you'll start your career developing an old school mindset that'll be unattractive to 98% of other companies. If it's your 2nd job you'll have something to compete it to and likely won't absorb the mindset unless you stay long. Lifers who've becomed dissatisfied due to recent changes have a hard time finding other jobs with their narrow skillset focused on low level programming and proprietary GE tools built before internet became a household term.

    Continue reading
    GE Healthcare2019-12-05
  4. "review of compnany"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at GE Healthcare full-time

    Pros

    very good company to work at

    Cons

    bad about this company to say in the review

    Continue reading
    GE Healthcare2019-11-23
  5. "Lot of opportunities"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I have been working at GE Healthcare full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Great benefits, lots of opportunity to grow.

    Cons

    Bottom line is everything, and the parent company is doing worse than GE Healthcare and so GE Healthcare suffers

    GE Healthcare2019-10-20
  6. "Great experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Software Engineer(Internship) 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at GE Healthcare for less than a year

    Pros

    Work-life balance, great company culture, and exciting projects.

    Cons

    I do not have any complaints.

    GE Healthcare2019-09-17
  7. "Nice WLB"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Sunnyvale, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at GE Healthcare full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Good colleagues. Opportunities to attend conferences per year. Free cell phone.

    Cons

    Relatively slow. Relatively low pay compared to the similar roles in other companies. Poor IT support.

    GE Healthcare2019-08-18
  8. "Best place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at GE Healthcare full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Good benefits. Work life balance

    Cons

    Nothing specific to mention other then Pros

    GE Healthcare2019-07-26
  9. Helpful (2)

    "Your mileage may very"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Embedded Software Engineer 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at GE Healthcare full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Access to a wide scope of resources Well established employee road maps for growth Plenty of room to grow as an employee Well structured chain of commands

    Cons

    Your experience can greatly depend on your site and/or manager Company bureaucracy can often get in the way of productivity Priorities are often given to fighting fires and meeting short-sighted deadlines Company reorganizations aren't very unusual and can cause a confusing chain of command It's very hard to say "No" or even be heard about a decision when it was made 2 or 3 managers above you

    GE Healthcare2019-07-09
  10. Helpful (2)

    "Might not be a good option."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Senior Staff Software Engineer 

    I have been working at GE Healthcare full-time

    Pros

    Good work life balance. WFH available.

    Cons

    Pay is not good. Not much career advancement opportunities.

    GE Healthcare2019-04-28
Found 185 reviews