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Gartner Reviews

Updated March 18, 2017
229 reviews

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3.0
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Gartner CEO and Director Gene Hall
Gene Hall
127 Ratings

229 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • I see A LOT of people with "work/life balance" as a con, I disagree completely and think it's very easy to maintain balance with this position (in 105 reviews)

  • You have the option to work from home if you need to and working hours can be flexible (in 34 reviews)

Cons
  • Work/Life balance is a bit tough at times (in 55 reviews)

  • Middle management in sales is a joke (in 40 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Extreme micro-managing and no distributed leadership"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Operations in Stamford, CT
    Current Contractor - Operations in Stamford, CT
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Gartner as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Pros

    *flexible work from home policy
    *respected industry leader

    Cons

    *as contract worker, zero opportunity to go above and beyond
    *indecisive management


  2. Helpful (4)

    "Account Executive"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Account Executive
    Current Employee - Account Executive
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Gartner full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Training is exceptional and every resource you need to be successful is at your fingertips. You are rewarded for a job well done with recognition, awards, trips, and extraordinary earning potential.

    Cons

    Your direct manager can make or break you. You can be either be micro-managed or receive little support neither of which are positive. Basically if you hit winners circle 2 years in a row you can move into management. Successful sales reps do not always make successful managers. At times it can feel a bit like a big frat/sorority house. Territories are not fairly balanced and growth opportunities with brand new accounts is not divided fairly. You are trained to be very strategic and conduct a solution sale, but bottom line is it is very transnational.


  3. Helpful (3)

    "Business Development Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Business Development Manager in Fort Myers, FL
    Current Employee - Business Development Manager in Fort Myers, FL
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Gartner full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Very young environment and culture. A more than reasonable salary for students straight out of college/entry level. Amazing training program for consultive sales (Gartner calls "value selling"). Opportunities to grow within the company in a short period of time. Great incentives for top achievers and continuous motivation for exceeding quota. Team-like atmosphere and encouragement for leadership. Many opportunities to make a ton of money - no cap on commission.

    Cons

    Hiring employees that are very young and straight out of college often results in a very immature "high school" environment. Often a wolf-of-wallstreet feeling when going after big incentives - resulting in a lot of "bad business" sold to C-level executives that could have been great network sources for young professionals. The management level is not reputable or credible enough to hold their role. There are managers on the floor who haven't even been in an office role for more than a year and have sold barely any business. Therefore, it is very common to be "mentored" and "coached" by someone who probably can't sell a deal on their own. That said, the "growth opportunities" aren't as rewarding when obtained.

    Advice to Management

    Start maturing your staff, listening to employee needs and stop promoting individuals who haven't proven consistent(and independent) achievement.


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  5. Helpful (8)

    "Ruining a good company with metrics"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Vice President Research
    Former Employee - Vice President Research
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Gartner full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Really smart, dedicated people who want to do the right thing for customers

    Cons

    Overly political
    Too focused on meaningless metrics

    Advice to Management

    You get what you measure


  6. Helpful (6)

    "Sales at Gartner"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Sales
    Current Employee - Sales
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Gartner full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Smart People, great benefits, and flexible work environment. Services are very valuable and impactful when properly aligned.

    Cons

    Rigid process and metrics with regard to work. No room for individual style or variation from corporate process. The company's focus on growth promotes the forced sale of inappropriately large solutions in order to maximize revenue attainement, rather than sizing solutions to the needs of the client.

    Advice to Management

    Focus is shifting from "How can we deliver value to the client" to "how can we make lots of money." The two are inextricably linked. Working there was more gratifying when the focus was on the client. The money follows.


  7. Helpful (6)

    "No Growth in Stamford"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Project Manager in Stamford, CT
    Current Employee - Project Manager in Stamford, CT

    I have been working at Gartner (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Very generous with paid time off.

    Cons

    They are in the habit of hiring people fresh out of college. The long standing top performers aren't always recognized by management, or paid a competitive wage compared to new hires.
    Most of the growth opportunities are in the Florida office.


  8. Helpful (4)

    "Invest"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    - Phenomenal research. I was always impressed by the quality and depth with which Gartner covers the enterprise technology markets.
    - Positive corporate culture. Compared to some other places I’ve worked, Gartner’s culture was one of the best. Folks are usually willing to mentor and share advice, and are generally speaking, just nice people.
    - Independence and flexibility for account executives. This was a nice and underappreciated feature.

    Cons

    This commentary is primarily about Gartner Invest, not Gartner as a whole. Invest is essentially a glorified sales team layered on top of the mainline research. It got big enough to where it should've been behaving as a "grown-up" business unit, and it stagnated enough to where leaders finally started asking those existential questions about where the uncertain adolescence was heading.

    - In trying to follow the broader corporate strategy, Invest traps itself in a cycle of over-hiring for its salesforce. By over-hiring, it reduces territories to laughable sizes, which sets up AE churn. By that AE churn, it prevents itself from realizing sustained and sustainable growth momentum. 40+ salespeople to cover a stagnating North American investor end-market is at least 10 too many. With that many people, yeah, you’re going to get a growth number, but your net figure will stay flattish. Don't even get me started on per-AE productivity. Thus the hamster wheel turns.

    - In startling contrast to the over-investment in the salesforce is a longstanding refusal/inability to invest in the product. The idea of a ~50mm business investing ZERO in product is somehow, remarkably, true. Product development seemed limited to varieating pricing schemas that sliced-and-diced the same existing deliverables into ever-more confusing permutations. The product sheet, such as it was, was a complete joke. They couldn’t make it more confusing if they tried. Why is crap like AMR and Burton still on there? Why would anyone think that clients understand what that means? Your salespeople don’t even know what it means. But I’m digressing here. The point is that rules of gravity will catch up with a business that throws all its dollars into building a salesforce but invests zero into its product. It shows. And let's be honest, this is what happens when salespeople run a business. How different would the business look if had spent say, 10% of that salesforce overhiring budget into productizing a new Invest-specific deliverable? How many glass ceilings at the sub-60k accounts would that have broken?

    - Invest’s dilapidated client servicing apparatus. Whether half that team is brain dead or whether their morale is totally drained, I couldn't tell you. But these guys were set up to fail from the start. The way they measure client managers is totally disconnected from the way the business actually runs. But beyond that, to show you how far the structural dissonance goes, Invest’s CLIENT managers never meet their CLIENTS. I’ve never seen a client-facing organization sequester its client managers into some forgotten broom closet like they did. Ultimately this structural failure results in account executives servicing clients, which suppresses growth numbers, because they’re not out selling. Which leads to overhiring AEs to find growth, which leads to more churn. And thus the hamster wheel turns.

    - The one thing differentiating Invest from the rest of Gartner are its “Invest analysts”. It was clear for awhile that something was off. Half the team seemed checked out. The other half was washed up or shouldn't have been hired. Cliff Noting the research or earnings numbers was never the point. We didn't see enough actionable analysis. On the other hand, the salesforce became spectacularly incurious. For the new reps, that was simply the culture they entered, it was unfortunately all they knew. The problems fed each other. Thus the hamster wheel turns. The saddest thing is that there is 100% a need for Invest analysts. Because you can’t win buy-side clients on process alone. You win with differentiated alpha-driving content, bottom line.

    Advice to Management

    Never listened to me before, but here's what I would advise:

    1. Stop cutting the same turd into different pieces and calling it new product. Actually invest in new product.
    2. Completely overhaul the client-facing organization. You should have dedicated hunters and dedicated farmers. Period. The ICM joke stopped being funny a long time ago.
    3. Do continue professionalizing the business.
    4. But stop doing things just because the rest of Gartner is doing them. Way way too much of that.
    5. Lastly and most importantly, the business needs a strategic leader (sunshine pumping is not a strategy by the way) that's NOT a salesperson and that's NOT trapped in the quarter-to-quarter game. It needs a leader who can think and execute on long-term timelines.


  9. Helpful (11)

    "Bad management, effective sales training & process, poor culture"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive SMB in Fort Myers, FL
    Former Employee - Account Executive SMB in Fort Myers, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Gartner full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    -World-class Training
    --The Training is world-class. I've been in several organization and never have I received training like at Gartner. Be careful though, you have to do well or they will fire you before training is over. In my academy class, they fired 5 people before graduating from training.

    -Great Retention and Prospecting best practices

    -Gartner looks great on your resume to other Tech companies

    -IT research and working with analyst community
    --Gartner allows you to work with some of the brightest minds in IT, the analyst community. Take advantage of a free username and password to the Gartner research portal. You can read the same research and listen to calls that CIO's, CMO's and other C-levels pay thousands of dollars for. I read our Tech Go-to-Market research that was aimed for CMO's and it helped me with the job a ton.

    -Team atmosphere
    --Working with my team was the best part about my job. My manager rarely helped my team develop, but the senior AE's on my team were directly responsible for my success at Gartner. Everyone on my team cared about the next person and wanted them to do well.

    -The Value is there
    --There is a ton of value our services can bring our clients. It's truly a valuable service that most of our clients renew, if they are using the service. It's learning how to educate your client's on how to use the service properly.

    -Overall, great first job.
    --If you can get through the con list below, I would strongly recommend giving this place a shot for your first job.

    Cons

    -No Diversity
    --There is one kind of person that fits in well for Gartner: Male, White, Jock/Bro, Unintelligent usually. Conversations at work consist of topics high school bros talk about. Very few females or people of other races.

    -Management
    --You'll find out that Gartner is big on values. One of the values corporate tries to push on us is "unlimited potential". So, you'll see many promotions during your time at Gartner. Unfortunately, many of those promotions are not deserving. Politics play a huge role. I've seen highly qualified candidates go for management, but they didn't get the job because a Vice President didn't like them. All the while, I've seen peers of mine promoted because they are close with a VP. There is no consistency in our hiring process.

    -Not real sales, all about luck.
    --Many AE's on the floor find themselves walking into large thousand-dollar deals. For example, someone on a team closed a $110,000 deal after being live on the floor for only two weeks. How did they close that deal you ask? They closed it because their manager gave them that prospect. That prospect had been in a previous sales cycle with an AE who left the company. That previous AE did a great job showing them value of Gartner, but because the new AE had the account now, he/she got the credit and closed the deal. Unfortunately, they have been receiving praise now for months because of that deal. Typically, AE's who sell the most get promotions. So you can see how that is skewed.

    -Propaganda, useless company meetings
    --Your calendar will quickly get filled up with invites from your managers, VP's and other leadership staff. They will attempt to manage your calendar for you, all the way down to every cold-call you make. If you like reviewing every email you send with your manager, before you send it, then this company is for you.

    -Chained to desk and the office
    --Don't be fooled by all the conference rooms in the office because you can't actually go in them. Managers want you at your desks at all time during the day. If you are gone for 10 minutes, your manager is texting you asking where you are at. The VP's boast about our work-from-home policy, but those are never awarded. Vacation time during Thanksgiving and the Holiday is almost impossible, because Q4 is our biggest quarter so they require all staff to be in the office until the books close at midnight on December 31st. Goodbye New Year's Even plans.

    -The longer you work for them, the more you find out and the less you like it
    --I loved Gartner at first. I loved my managers and my VP's. It was only a matter of time until I started to despise coming to work. I found out that all the values and propaganda that our leadership pushes down your throat are only fake. If you don't jive with their system, they will let you go without helping you first.

    Advice to Management

    To the VP's: Stop allowing our channel to hire so many new people, Don't pressure young AE's to burn relationships just to get a few more deals in before the end of the quarter, Meet with your AE's more, Try to hire outside of Florida and outside of the "typical" Gartner robot, inspire more creativity and less of your process.


  10. Helpful (3)

    "Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Stamford, CT
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Stamford, CT
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Gartner full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Collaboration across business units was great, some very smart people to learn from and are willing to be mentors. Time off policy very generous. Interesting work product (IT research).

    Cons

    Client service division seen as inferior to other units. Difficult to break into new roles within different areas of the business. ZERO opportunities for advancement outside of your own business unit. Lots of hiring from outside of the company instead of developing people to grow. Those without big consulting firm (McKinsey) backgrounds considered second class citizens.

    Advice to Management

    You have good people who started at the bottom. Figure out how to get them on promotion tracks and you'll have great, dedicated associates for a long time.


  11. "Account management Intern"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Anonymous Contractor
    Current Contractor - Anonymous Contractor
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Gartner as a contractor

    Pros

    Great Training, and learning opportunities

    Cons

    Frat like culture , in fort myers only.

    Advice to Management

    keep it up



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