General Motors Reviews | Glassdoor

General Motors Reviews

Updated July 21, 2017
2,466 reviews

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2,466 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Work life balance culture should be consistent throughout the company (in 82 reviews)

  • long hours and can sometimes be stressful (in 72 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Assembly line worker."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Assembly Line Worker in Wentzville, MO
    Current Employee - Assembly Line Worker in Wentzville, MO

    Pros

    Good benefits. Good union. Hours and overtime available. People working there are good to work with. Consistent hours and laid back dress code.

    Cons

    As a temp you are at the managements mercy on jobs and how much you work. As a temp not always treated the best. Respect as a whole from management to each other and employees isn't great. Some managers do a great job being respectful some not so much.

    Advice to Management

    Treat people with more respect as a whole


  2. "IT Perspective"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - IT Project Manager in Austin, TX
    Current Employee - IT Project Manager in Austin, TX
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    - casual dress
    - not strict on hours (get the job done)
    - good work life/balance
    - starts with 3 weeks vacation + 16 holidays
    - opportunities move around in the organization

    Cons

    - too many middle managers
    - very siloed

    Advice to Management

    - hire more experienced developers and trim the middle management

  3. Helpful (1)

    "Race to the Bottom/Manufacturing"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Engineer in Detroit, MI
    Current Employee - Senior Engineer in Detroit, MI
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Co-workers are great; Amazing amount of potential. With actual long-term goals in place, would be an amazing place to work for. Products themselves can be hit-or-miss, but are usually interesting.

    Cons

    At least in the manufacturing realm, the #1 motivator is fear. Anyone that can't be intimidated is eventually squeezed out to make for a compliant salaried workforce. Primary measurement in effect is Cost-per-unit: which is silly when you consider that the only lever that can be pulled at a plant level to adjust this is labor (hint: Understaff on purpose and enforce 'casual' overtime). I've worked or Co-op'ed in several GM manufacturing plants, and this is the case in pretty much every one.

    Rumor was, my current facility was dead-last of all manufacturing facilities in the Workplace-of-Choice survey in 2015. What floored me was that the 'interview' portion (which used an outside firm to gather anonymous feedback) was scheduled during a week where the plant was in shutdown: meaning that there weren't any employees around other than the select few that 'just so happened' to be in working overtime projects. To my knowledge, we have not been given the opportunity to do another plant-specific survey since.

    Arbitrary measurements: goal plans and glide-paths generally don't reflect real business conditions. Most of the Level 1/2/3 production measurements are set up on a weekly/monthly cycle which greatly rewards short-term decision making. This is especially frustrating for a maintenance expenditure: there's absolutely no way to amortize a large maintenance cost (i.e., a $30,000 motor) on a monthly budget. [Case in point: A machine was failing, replacement part cost was $15,000, but because the plant would have been 'red' for the monthly maintenance budget, instead of planning the replacement and purchasing the components, it was band-aided and continued to run. When it eventually failed the next month, the damage caused an additional $20,000 of collateral damage, and incurred several shifts of downtime until it could be repaired. There was no effort to acknowledge that the additional cost was due to a failure to act, because by the measurements it was a better outcome]

    Systems that are put in place for standardization never seem to be evaluated for efficacy in a closed-loop manner: the end result is a lot of motion that creates the illusion of work. Sad part is, every time there's a 'critical failure' we manage to add yet another required system on top of the 8 that were already there. Why this appears to work: the fear of having to go through another GMS/5-Why/Fishbone/RedX/Root Cause Analysis/Problem Solving Tool/Diagonal Slice/TPM/Six-Sigma/OpEX exercise causes employees to either avoid doing *anything* involving risk, or to hide the mistake and hope no-one finds out (I must point out that Bob Lutz acknowledges and nails this fact very, very hard in one of his recent books).

    Advice to Management

    I've seen enormous changes in the way corporate organizations (i.e., engineering/sales/marketing) is handling operations. Colleagues in Warren and Milford tell me that the workplace is drastically better now than they can remember. The 2020 events, the corporate leadership, all of the top end happenings are unrecognizable from the GM of 10 years ago.

    What I don't see, though, is that attitude and those expectations getting to the manufacturing facilities, at all. But then again, there seems to be a branding crisis where GM wants to be seen as a "tech" company rather than a manufacturer (100% serious: even HR and corporate recruiters are explicitly told not to refer to GM as a manufacturer anymore, but as a tech company "like Apple or Facebook"). If GM is giving up on being a manufacturer, fantastic. Otherwise, get serious about pushing the 'culture change' to the plants.


  4. "Integration Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Integration Engineer in Warren, MI
    Current Employee - Integration Engineer in Warren, MI
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great Flexibility in the Job. Fulfilling job, Great Benefits

    Cons

    Sometimes there is a lot of red tape to wade through.


  5. Helpful (1)

    "Production Supervisor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Production Supervisor in Lansing, MI
    Current Employee - Production Supervisor in Lansing, MI
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great salary, benefits and co-workers.

    Cons

    Must be able to work all shifts and overtime.

    Advice to Management

    Always look for potential over weaknesses.


  6. "Disorganized and Out of Touch"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Engineer in Warren, MI
    Former Employee - Engineer in Warren, MI
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at General Motors full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Worked with some great people

    Cons

    Major issues off the bat, like not having a computer for the first 6 weeks of the job.

    Advice to Management

    Get more organized


  7. "Learn"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Team Leader in Hamtramck, MI
    Current Employee - Team Leader in Hamtramck, MI
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Pay and benifits.pays their workers well if you have been a long time worker. Plant is safety conscious, cares about overall welfare

    Cons

    Poorly managed. Management is terribly remained to handle real life situations that occur with employees. Most become cynical and begin to resent their jobs.

    Advice to Management

    Gain people skills

  8. "Software Developer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Developer in Detroit, MI
    Current Employee - Software Developer in Detroit, MI
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Salary, Benefits, Flexibility, Bonuses, Vehicle Discounts, Opportunity For Movement & Growth.

    Cons

    Typical politics and bureaucracy inherent to large corporations, but the pros outweigh the cons, anything is possible with the right presentation, position and persistence.


  9. "Maint. Team Leader/ Machinist Technician"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Team Leader Maint in Town of Tonawanda, NY
    Current Employee - Team Leader Maint in Town of Tonawanda, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    the versatility of responsibilities that I am to hold up.
    the People are driven on safety

    Cons

    Working in Maintenance as a Team Leader with skilled trades too few to complete the task.

    Advice to Management

    Bring in more effective working experience maintenance personnel.


  10. Helpful (1)

    "Ok - but not as advertised"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Detroit, MI
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Detroit, MI
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at General Motors full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great Work Life Balance
    High Pay & Compensation
    Company Prestige - GM is in an excellent position for the autonomous future
    The ability to work on some really cool projects where you feel like you can have a major impact

    Cons

    Lack of Career Development Resources
    Silos
    Culture in IT - Some groups can be very combative...
    Detroit IT is seen as less valuable than IT staff in Austin
    People not performing
    How many managers and project delivery leads do we need for a single project?
    Project Managers should have training in project management - ideally a certification - I've been on horrid projects that are nothing but putting out fires due in large part to misallocation of resources and ineffectively managing stakeholders
    Titles are wonky - people get really weird about it, and it's hard to explain until you've been around a "data scientist" who struggles to implement/explain regression or a "solution architect" who doesn't understand client -> server

    Advice to Management

    Attack the culture of coasting by that seems to be present in many areas of IT.

    Encourage best practices among employees by supporting ongoing training and development.

    Recognize employees who excel. I love the nomination process where we can help recognize those who excel. It made my year to receive that from a client. I feel like we need to emphasize those kinds of initiatives and help build up a culture of pro-activity.

    For the love of all that is holy, stop evaluating IT projects by ADBB. It is a voodoo process to prioritize projects with - as far as I am aware - no standard calculation that is easily verified. Adopt a standard calculation and actually evaluate projects after they are deployed. I could claim to have saved the company billions, but without formal evaluation, I would call baloney. Alternatively, consider other ways to evaluate projects in the pipeline.

    IT should not be seen as separate from the business. If we are now supposed to be 80% innovation, then we need to be doing more to support innovation that reduces costs or increases revenue.

    Also, I'm sorry, but sending out a spreadsheet with job titles and descriptions for higher grade positions does not constitute career counseling - I could have found that out from indeed.com... Employees definitely need to own their careers, but why do employees need to leave GM to be hired back in at a higher grade or in a position of more responsibility?

    Rein in your recruiters. During my search process that led me to GM, I received printed material and was assured by several people I interacted with that I would joining a development program with rotational assignments, active senior management engagement, and ongoing training opportunities. FYI Everyone, there is no IT development program. It is a college new hire program with high compensation but no formal opportunities like the other GM development programs. If you say you have a formal rotational process and support ongoing development, then you need to follow through and do that.


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