Google Reviews in Mountain View, CA | Glassdoor

Google Mountain View Reviews

Updated April 24, 2017
1,567 reviews

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Mountain View, CA

4.2
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Pros
Cons
  • Work life balance is often mentioned but rarely (in 270 reviews)

  • Google is a big company with a lot of insider technologies; don't expect to know it all from day one (in 231 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (331)

    "The best place I've worked and also the most demanding."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    You can't find a more well-regarded company that actually deserves the hype it gets.

    You'll work on cutting edge projects / solve important issues that impact your community and the world

    You'll meet interesting people who are your colleagues, managers, and senior management.

    You'll open the paper and see your company in the news almost every day, and read about projects you're working on, which is a cool thing

    You'll see Larry and Sergey at TGIF and you'll admire how they lead the company. They are brilliant, goofy, low key but intense, and likeable.

    There are 22 cafes (more or less), the food is excellent, and it's free.

    Your pay will typically be competitive, though it needs to be tweaked up a bit since the economy has improved.

    Google cares about how it treats its employees.

    The campus is like an academic campus in many ways.

    There are tons of activities on campus, like authors speaking about their books, films after work, and gyms where you can work out - but you'll need to make sure to carve out time to do these things.

    You'll get plenty of external validation from people who suddenly think you're smart and rich because you work there, even if you're not rich and you're as smart when you didn't work at Google.

    If and when you leave, you'll never regret having that company on your resume. It opens doors.

    The company is flexible - if you're lucky, you won't have a micromanager boss and you can be somewhat flexible in how you work - but don't get me wrong - you'll work a LOT. But you don't have to do all of it chained to your desk.

    Cons

    I live in SF so the commute can take between 1.5 hours to 1.75 hours each way on the shuttle - sometimes 2 hours each way on a busy day or rainy day. That means being on the bus for 3-4 hours PER DAY. It's a wired bus though which means you can work on the way to Mountain View. But it can feel brutal.

    Your first year or two are really important in terms of your career at Google and they affect how you're viewed, and your ability to be promoted. You should always ask to work on high profile projects. If you don't get them, don't expect to get high ratings or get promoted. Always volunteer for cross functional group work for maximum exposure, and then work hard at those things.

    You'll likely work on something that no one will explain to you and it will take you at least a year to be comfortable doing what you're working on, even if you're super quick at learning. No one has time to train you or teach you what you're doing - which is kind of hard.

    After two or three years, people you started out with at Google start to get promoted. If you're not one of them, you'll wonder why and how it happened, and that process is somewhat political and not always clear.

    It's a big company now. And super political. So don't be naive. Expect some people to be catty, some people to be territorial, and be prepared to be mentally tough. Don't let people see your vulnerableness. It's a Darwinistic culture with a huge dose of 30-something idealism on top which can fool you into thinking that people are easygoing - they're not. They're driven. If you're not driven, you're not going to fit in.

    When you start at Google, it seems like peer reviews are super important - they are, but they are the sprinkles on the fro yo. The important thing is that your direct manager knows your work, likes your work and likes you, and then you can get promoted. If your boss doesn't like you, all the positive peer reviews in the world won't help you. Make sure you know what your boss wants, and give it to them. You will have weekly one on ones, and make sure you are addressing your performance at each one, asking if they have questions, how you can improve, can you work on cross functional projects, etc.

    It's really hard to find work life balance at Google. The workload is huge. I hardly have time to work out. The commute is brutal. My family sometimes needs more from me and I can't give it. I'm still trying to find the balance. I think I need more down time than most people so I have a hard time being structured every day to fit all the things I want into my day, so a lot of things slip, like working out.

    Advice to Management

    Keep on NOT micromanaging - that is a huge benefit to Google. Most of us have a huge workload and we work in spikes and not chained to our desks, and we care deeply about producing, and we produce a lot. We can do that because you respect us enough to give us some freedom in how we do our jobs.


  2. Helpful (1554)

    "Moving at the speed of light, burn out is inevitable"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Program Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - Program Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Google full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    1) Food, food, food. 15+ cafes on main campus (MTV) alone. Mini-kitchens, snacks, drinks, free breakfast/lunch/dinner, all day, errr'day.

    2) Benefits/perks. Free 24:7 gym access (on MTV campus). Free (self service) laundry (washer/dryer) available. Bowling alley. Volley ball pit. Custom-built and exclusive employee use only outdoor sport park (MTV). Free health/fitness assessments. Dog-friendly. Etc. etc. etc.

    3) Compensation. In ~2010 or 2011, Google updated its compensation packages so that they were more competitive.

    4) For the size of the organization (30K+), it has remained relatively innovative, nimble, and fast-paced and open with communication but, that is definitely changing (for the worse).

    5) With so many departments, focus areas, and products, *in theory*, you should have plenty of opportunity to grow your career (horizontally or vertically). In practice, not true.

    6) You get to work with some of the brightest, most innovative and hard-working/diligent minds in the industry. There's a "con" to that, too (see below).

    Cons

    1) Work/life balance. What balance? All those perks and benefits are an illusion. They keep you at work and they help you to be more productive. I've never met anybody at Google who actually time off on weekends or on vacations. You may not hear management say, "You have to work on weekends/vacations" but, they set the culture by doing so - and it inevitably trickles down. I don't know if Google inadvertently hires the work-a-holics or if they create work-a-holics in us. Regardless, I have seen way too many of the following: marriages fall apart, colleagues choosing work and projects over family, colleagues getting physically sick and ill because of stress, colleagues crying while at work because of the stress, colleagues shooting out emails at midnight, 1am, 2am, 3am. It is absolutely ridiculous and something needs to change.

    2) Poor management. I think the issue is that, a majority of people love Google because they get to work on interesting technical problems - and these are the people that see little value in learning how to develop emotional intelligence. Perhaps they enjoy technical problems because people are too "difficult." People are promoted into management positions - not because they actually know how to lead/manage, but because they happen to be smart or because there is no other path to grow into. So there is a layer of intelligent individuals who are horrible managers and leaders. Yet, there is no value system to actually do anything about that because "emotional intelligence" or "adaptive leadership" are not taken seriously.

    3) Jerks. Sure, there are a lot of brilliant people - but, sadly, there are also a lot of jerks (and, many times, they are one and the same). Years ago, that wasn't the case. I don't know if the pool of candidates is getting smaller, or maybe all the folks with great personalities cashed out and left, or maybe people are getting burned out and it's wearing on their personality and patience. I've heard stories of managers straight-up cussing out their employees and intimidating/scaring their employees into compliance.

    4) It's a giant company now and, inevitably, it has become slower moving and is now layered with process and bureaucracy. So many political battles, empire building, territory grabbing. Google says, "Don't be evil." But, that practice doesn't seem to be put into place when it comes to internal practices. :(

    Advice to Management

    1) Don't dismiss emotional intelligence and adaptive leadership. They're not just catch phases. You need great managers and leaders in order to build great companies and develop great employees. The people who may be brilliant at solving technical issues may not be (and are most often, not) the best candidates for management.

    2) Do something about that work-ife balance. Don't just have a bunch of pow-wows and tech talks and discussions about it. Leadership should actually model it. Consider re-evaluating how work is done; what processes are in place that are inefficient and ineffective and need to be updated or removed?

    3) Don't forget that there is already a pool of incredibly talented people within the company. If career development is really a goal at Google, then do it. Don't just hire from the outside. Take the time to help your employees develop their careers - then maybe you won't lose some of the great ones, and maybe you'll have prevent some of that burn out and disillusionment.


  3. Helpful (2)

    "Love my job"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Google full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Incredible people, I'm so fortunate to work here

    Cons

    There really aren't any, it's a lovely job!

    Advice to Management

    Keep that stock price increasing


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  5. Helpful (2)

    "Amazing SUmmer"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineering Intern in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - Software Engineering Intern in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Great people, never met an annoying person. The social values of the company are great. Relaxed environment is a big plus.

    Cons

    Stockholm syndrome :/ It is easy to feel intimidated. Google is a big company with a lot of insider technologies; don't expect to know it all from day one.


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Software Engineer"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Google full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    - Opportunity to work on meaningful products with global impact.
    - The company really cares about employees being happy, growing, performing.
    - You can move around to different teams, roles, and offices relatively easily to find the right fit.
    - Tons of employee development programs and perks.
    - Generous compensation-based performance.
    - Very smart, mostly well-intentioned coworkers.
    - Amazing developer tooling. I especially liked the internal code review tool. I haven't seen anything as powerful outside.
    - Google will be around for a long time and continue to be a great place to work and build a career. So stability, depending on your preference.

    Cons

    - Impact and growth opportunities depend heavily on your team.
    - When you first join, you are typically assigned to a team, so you might not be working on something you're super excited about. (You can transfer after 18 months.)
    - Your equity is (probably) not going to 10x.
    - The tech stack is different than the rest of the industry, though with Google Cloud Platform they are trying to change that.
    - SF to Mountain View commute is soul-sucking.
    - Not allowed to work on side projects that make money.
    - Depending on the team, people are not as hungry, young, motivated as what you might find at startups.
    - Promotions are determined outside your team. It's the best system I could imagine, but it's also time-consuming and slow.


  7. "Partner Brand Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Partner Brand Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Current Contractor - Partner Brand Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Google as a contractor (More than a year)

    Pros

    Work on great products with some really smart people.

    Cons

    As a contractor, don't expect anything full time to be coming your way nor expect your team to care about career advancement.


  8. Helpful (3)

    "Marketing Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Marketing Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - Marketing Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Google full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    - Incredibly smart, inspiring people to be around
    - Culture pushes you to think big
    - Pay/Benefits top notch

    Cons

    - Bureaucracy and politics exist
    - The commute if you don't work in MTV but are based there
    - Work life balance is often mentioned but rarely


  9. "Great comp and benefits but decision making can be erratic."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Sals Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - Sals Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Google full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Highly competitive compensation and amazing benefits.

    Cons

    Decision making can be erratic.

    Advice to Management

    Greater focus on business issues that drive value.


  10. "UX Mangaer"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - User Experience Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - User Experience Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Google full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    - people & culture
    - scale of problems
    - comp

    Cons

    - political fighting
    - lack of design curiosity

    Advice to Management

    n/a


  11. "I was contractor from third party company, providing software services."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Slave in Mountain View, CA
    Former Contractor - Slave in Mountain View, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Google as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Free food, nice weather, caltrain. Palm trees, nice mountains, valley and air.

    Cons

    Complex management, you have to much bosses, and too little freedom, Bad incompetent bosses, expensive California, low salary, no perspectives, no life, sadistic managers intentions, I was near to commit suicide there, however happily relocated back to my country.

    Advice to Management

    Be honest: You are just financial company, and software support company, everything that gives you a value and growth of stocks was bought (yes, talented people leave than after acquisition), but you have California full of start-ups you can buy to increase your stocks price.



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