Grayling "no one" Reviews | Glassdoor

Grayling Employee Reviews about "no one"

Updated Jan 4, 2018

To filter reviews, or .

3.6
71%
Recommend to a Friend
100%
Approve of CEO
Grayling CEO Committee Loretta Ahmed, Sarah Scholefield, and Jan Simunek (no image)
Loretta Ahmed, Sarah Scholefield, and Jan Simunek
7 Ratings
Pros
  • "Work from home Fridays is nice to avoid the toxic environment of the office(in 14 reviews)

  • "Great place to work and learn and also work life balance is good cares about employees wellbeing(in 9 reviews)

Cons
  • "Some senior management were out of their depth and hanging on to positions for their salaries instead of committing to continuous improvement(in 9 reviews)

  • "As second in command to my colleague, no one could say I wasn't capable and that it didn't make sense(in 8 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "no one"

Return to all Reviews
  1. Helpful (1)

    "Wouldn't go to Any Other Agency"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Account Executive in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Grayling full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    A very streamlined style of PR that cuts out a lot of the nonsense and offers a streamlined, quality approach to media relations. My team was particularly close and that fostered a secure, honest and fun-loving workplace. Atomic is the "anti-agency" and I love them for it. More pros: Job security--Atomic does fire people, but it has to be an extreme situation, and they work on issues with people... individually before handing out pink slips. Access to top-levels--you sit right next to your VP so you can always ask questions and use your team as a resource. Work from home benefit Cell/internet reimbursement The week between Chistmas and New Year's off

    Show More

    Cons

    I left Atomic because I wanted to get out of agency PR.My team was particularly close, which wasn't always a good thing. Managers were often inconsistent and rude. More cons: Open seating environment, people can see your computer screen all day Teams work independently, meaning if the lead is doing something wrong, no one who can do anything about it will know No regular reviews, if it's time for a... raise/promotion you'll have to ask for it

    Show More

    Advice to Management

    Keep the Atomic style, it's as functional as it is unique. Be consistent and professional by holding everyone to the same standard.

    Grayling2012-08-27
  2. Helpful (12)

    "Discriminated against for being a woman and pregnant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Vice President in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Grayling full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Grayling Europe has an excellent reputation.

    Cons

    I was a vice president in the Los Angeles office of Grayling when my managing director, a talented friend of mine with about a year more time in the biz than me, resigned to take an in-house position. He had been at the helm about a year. After 3 months in the role, he was promoted from interim managing director to full managing director. After he left and upon his recommendation, I lobbied to take his place to our... CEO Peter Harris. I had an excellent rapport with the global team and had helped improve the Los Angeles office since joining the company. As second in command to my colleague, no one could say I wasn't capable and that it didn't make sense. My lobbying was met with immediate resistance. "It's a big job." "Are you sure you want to do this at this point in your life?", etc. I had just gotten married and am of child bearing years. A first strike. Begrudgingly, I was allowed to assume the role, but was offered only a promotion to SVP and an extremely low raise for that title (though I wouldn’t know how much less I was making than my male predecessor and future MD in SF until later, when the CFO accidentally shared a document with salary allocation to the entire leadership team - in case you’re curious it was a full 70K less at first and then 30K when I insisted we close the gap further after 3 months. I was never was paid equally, even when I asked specifically to make what was being paid to men in the same role.) During the SVP promo conversation, I asked about interim managing director title. I had seen my male predecessor's trajectory and given our identical qualifications, I expected to follow suit. I was told, “we are not sure we’re going to continue with individual office MD’s.” I accepted, and towed the company line, requesting/demanding quarterly reviews to ensure I was crystal clear on expectations and progress. I had to hammer Peter Harris to get those meetings, and get clear and measurable goals and timelines for my “earning” the title of managing director. I was told to meet the numbers for the office, reduce turnover and maintain the client roster, as well as grow the new business pipeline from zero. He refused to set timelines with me. Point blank. In addition to saving clients from other offices, maintaining my team and growing my clients organically, toward the end of the year, I secured a six-figure project with a former client due to my work and reputation. This not only closed the numbers for LA, but also went toward closing the gap for the U.S. I was concerned about not being in the office, as it was an on-site 100% allocation project, but Peter told me it wasn’t an issue and that the lack of momentum on new biz wouldn’t be an issue. While I was off-site for the last quarter of 2016 with this project, I found out through the grapevine that the leadership has been searching for a new MD in SF, so obviously the managing director structure was to continue. I pushed immediately for a review. it was November. In February 2017, literally the day before my maternity leave was to start, I was finally granted the check in conversation - not even a formal review. I was told that I wasn’t creating enough new business momentum through the prior quarter and that I “just wasn’t ready.” So not only did he back pedal on what he had said previously, but the reasons for not promoting me were nebulous. I had earned it and then some, clear and simple. To me, there is no clearer example of discrimination on the basis of sex than my experience described above. I was pregnant, young and a woman. Despite constant meeting of a consistently and randomly raised bar, I was still not paid or titled equally to my male counterparts. While this did happen at Grayling, and I strongly suggest you do not work there if at all possible, it happens everywhere in this industry. I hope this is a call to other professionals to shine a light where one is so desperately needed.

    Show More

    Advice to Management

    I hope the responses to negative reviews on here are true, but the environment I was in just 10 months ago can't have changed as much as you say. It's obvious the new leadership - since the CEO resigned or was fired, the MD in SF was replaced AGAIN, and a remote worker was named to a largely ornamental C-suite role - is needing to paint a rosier picture of the agency to get people to work there. Pretty transparent... guys.

    Show More
    Grayling2018-01-04
  3. Helpful (5)

    "Sinking Ship, terrible management"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Account Executive in San Francisco, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Grayling full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Unlimited holiday time (but very unstructured), Work from home Fridays Self starters flourish Strong female team

    Cons

    - Basically no training on entry. Even entry level people are thrown into accounts and just expected to just put in the hours and figure it out. Attempts were made to add some level of training in recent times, but still the on-boarding process was awful. - Senior management is all over the place. Very out of touch with what is going on with staff and accounts, outside the flagship ones. Account managers... expected to keep the accounts going with no input from management and then thrown under the bus if something happens. Cycled through a number of managing directors, all with no experience about how to run a business and deal with people. The VPs didn't seem motivated to win new accounts and would try and use employees contacts to get references rather than go out and seek some new accounts. Terrible atmosphere: People were constantly leaving and no-one new coming in. This led to some people having really big work loads with others scrambling around looking for things to make themselves look busy. Senior management were rarely in the office, choosing to work from home or what not, which meant that there would usually be a bunch of under 30s in the office at all times. - Accounts were constantly leaving and therefore people were being let go, by the luck of the draw of their account leaving because senior management didn't know what to do to keep them. - The recent merger was handled very badly so every single person from the original acquired company has left. Therefore there was very little experience among team members expected to run Enterprise accounts. Yet people formerly with Atomic (mostly consumer practice) were kept on because the new CEO knew them better.

    Show More

    Advice to Management

    Don't just hire former PR people to run a company. Bring someone with management and business experience to compliment the rest of the team. Put some faith in your employees and don't just rely on outside hires. Senior management shouldn't play favorites based on friendship and not talent.

    Grayling2015-08-12
  4. Helpful (8)

    "Held a lot of promise but failed to deliver"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Grayling full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Really great health benefits and had flexibility with work. Work from home Fridays were a huge plus and some of the clients were fairly impressive to have on the roster. The HR people were probably the best part of the company - very responsive and tried to help bad situations wherever possible.

    Cons

    the management was not committed to finding new business and did not seem concerned about their employees growing as professionals. It became a cutthroat environment with public shaming and calling employees liars without having basic facts. Junior staff was made to work long hours with no direction from senior management. Managers were not given the tools or guidance they needed to effectively manage. Reviews... were non-existent and when employees pushed for reviews they were punished. Each office acted as its own entity and there is not a cohesion throughout the company. Grayling, in comparison to other top 20 agencies, does not act like a big player. No one stuck to budgeted hours and interns were expected to work extra hours without compensation. Employees were threated, yelled at and called names by managers and senior management did not show concern. Overall it was an unfortunate setting and not a place to grow one's career or learn.

    Show More

    Advice to Management

    Bring in people who care about their employees and care about having a team environment. Develop a clear company culture then hire according to the culture. Keep a closer eye on individual offices to ensure proper practices are taking place and hold executive leadership accountable for missteps.

    Grayling2015-06-26
  5. "Client-side"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Grayling

    Pros

    The keys still work and they owe me money is the ONLY reason I'm still trying to make it work.

    Cons

    Management is lacking leadership skills and professional training. There's a void in skilled teams. No one seems qualified to do their jobs!

    Advice to Management

    Send ALL current managers to therapists and a proctologist.

    Grayling2015-05-12
  6. Helpful (10)

    "Not the greatest experience...."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Grayling

    Pros

    Working from home on Fridays More responsibility due to understaffing (pro and con...)

    Cons

    Understaffed and unwilling to get people in quickly in order to improve efficiency No one sticks their necks out for people, every man for himself The managers do not really do much to help out their employees... clearly see there are issues but do nothing to make changes Work is passed off onto the lower levels, yet they are underpaid and under appreciated Lacks culture, everyone is so stressed out all the... time, no one has fun or even tries to get to know each other

    Show More

    Advice to Management

    When you see something is not right, do something about it. I believe that the reason this company has such high turnover is because it does not make its employees a priority.

    Grayling2015-01-22
  7. Helpful (6)

    "No loyalty and no clue"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Grayling full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Great client names and some really lovely, talented people who battle on doing the best they can.

    Cons

    Grayling in the UK is spiralling down the plug hole and the constant reaction to more failure is to cut more staff, regardless of how important they are to client relationships and teams. There is no strategy and no internal comms. The leadership team are not leaders - they're puppets of a pointless holding company. No-one is valued and no-one is safe. Steer clear.

    Advice to Management

    Quit axing your best people and take a realistic look at where the talent, skills and client relationships really sit and where they don't. Start with the mirror.

    Grayling2016-10-05
  8. Helpful (5)

    "Fake office environment with few prospects"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Consultant in London, England
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Grayling

    Pros

    great clients and that's about it- the company culture leaves much to be desired

    Cons

    I worked at Grayling for just over 3 years as a Consultant in the Brands team. I mainly stayed because of the clients and the some of the great relationships that I had them. However, as the years went on the office environment became incredibly catty and I felt that I needed to get out. I now work for another agency who do normal hours (9-5) and I actually appreciate having a life outside the office!! In the Brands... team I felt a pressure to work after my hours (9-6) - sometimes working until 8pm (!) which took a massive toll on my social life. Being a sociable person, I was also extremely surprised by the lack of social and team activities that were encouraged. There are hardly ever 'Friday drinks' - despite the promise of 'finishing at 4pm on a Friday'. Believe me - this never happens. There is also a very strange culture where at the end of the week staff nominate someone who they think have 'gone the extra mile'. Often, if you work hard and achieve great results and no one nominates you- it makes you feel rubbish and completely undervalued. The whole thing is a popularity contest encouraged by the senior management and forced upon the whole team who look visibly uncomfortable whenever the 'nominations' come around. I also felt very sorry for some of the junior staff who were treated very badly while I were there. They were told to write up media lists day after day- I can't see how this helps them further their careers in PR? Also not long before I left, two new junior staff members joined- one in particular some of the female management took an instant disliking to (made obvious by their catty and unprofessional remarks). She had not been there very long so I suspected it had to do with the fact that she was very confident and pretty. Luckily this happened after I handed in my notice - but it made it clearer in my mind that I was making the right decision. As with some of the reviews below - there are no 'benefits' that come with working at Grayling. You pay for everything yourself except from the weekly fruit. This is shameful when you think of the hours some of the staff work.

    Show More

    Advice to Management

    -Don't frown upon staff who leave at 6pm (everyone deserves a life outside the office and your staff will be better for it) - Offer your staff real benefits that they don't have to pay for out of their own pocket - The senior management in the brands team need to come down a peg or two. There are one or two females who think they are above everyone else - Do more social activities to encourage team bonding - I... felt like I barely knew some of you! - Treat your junior staff with more respect

    Show More
    Grayling2014-12-17
Found 8 reviews