HubShout Reviews | Glassdoor

HubShout Reviews

Updated July 19, 2017
50 reviews

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3.3
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Chad Hill
31 Ratings

50 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • If you're a writer, you eventually get the chance to be able to work from home pretty much any time (in 5 reviews)

  • As far as personal development and business, I had the chance to learn a lot and take initiative on certain projects (in 5 reviews)

Cons
  • In regards to pay, it's an entry level position that does pay slightly more than most (in 6 reviews)

  • No Free coffee but they provide the keureg, Cream & sugar (in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Solid stepping stone to the next opportunity"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The teams were close, and there was cooperation across all teams to get the job done. The office was open to new ideas on how to solve various problems, so it was a place where you could come with a well thought out idea and actually implement. I also learned a lot of skills that would have been impossible to learn in the same amount of time without the hands on experience with so many clients.

    This place gives you the experience of someone who has worked in the field for years, but without that wait. After working there a few years, I was able to work on hundreds of sites, see tons of different scenarios that we needed to figure out a solution, and improve both technically and personally.

    As an analyst we had internal contests to see who could hit more of their client goals. At the end of the month we would get a small bonus ($50 amazon gift card I think).

    Cons

    I think I agree with some of the other reviews where the workload did become an issue at times. The HubShout team tried to manage it, but looking back I think we could have done some things differently. Hindsight is 20/20 I suppose. I hear they're doing better with it now, so hopefully they have a system worked out to help people feel like the work is manageable.

    This is the same issue most agencies have, so I don't feel too bad pointing it out here.

    The hiring process was a little bit of a mess when I was there. It would have been better if there was one set HR person in the company, then had teams meet later on in the interview process. It would help curb wasted time with applicants who didn't fit.

    I don't think there was a ton of room to advance within the company. There were a few spots, but for the majority of people working here the only way to move up is to move out of the company.

    Advice to Management

    Develop real skills for everyone in the organization. Keep understanding (which I know you do) that the junior staff you hire will soon leave for better compensation.

    The best compensation I got from this company was working on some of the biggest accounts, and working with the volume of different types of accounts. I left the company a few years ago, I still refer back to some of the work I did. It's a resume builder, and it made me a better analyst. Challenge the people in the organization who want more from the organization by giving them a shot at bigger projects. If they are smart, they'll do the best job they can which they can then use at the next interview.

    Pay is lower than I would have liked, but I also understand it's a starting point. Funny thing is that pay here was higher than the first "agency" I worked at in the area. Find what people really care about, then try to give it to them. If they only care about money, then work out different goal based bonuses throughout the year (either per period or per project).

    Parties and free beer are fun for morale, but continue to work on a way to reward employees for the direct contributions they make.


  2. "I'm reluctant to speak poorly of my experience, but it's a hard place to grow in many ways."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    -What can I say? It was the first place that would hire me as an English major out of college, and at HubShout I was able to not only learn how to meet extreme (albeit unrealistic) demands, but get a hands-on experience with SEO and digital marketing, which were two subjects I knew nothing about before this job.
    -HubShout was big on extracurriculars. It actually felt like high school sometimes. As far as personal development and business, I had the chance to learn a lot and take initiative on certain projects.
    -My team was great. HubShout is like a weird little family and there were plenty of reasons to get together and get to know one another.
    -Amazing health insurance. I had an excellent and affordable healthcare plan.
    -Only a year and some change after leaving HubShout I landed a senior level position. I can't give Hub all of the credit; but I believe in stepping stones and it was an inevitable stepping stone on my journey.

    Cons

    -No matter which way you slice it, HubShout honestly depends on cheap labor and takes advantage of undergrads. While 12.20 an hour is above the minimum wage, it's hardly livable. I was lucky enough to receive help from my parents -- as many of my fellow coworkers had -- but otherwise it's really hard to get by on so little money without working another job.
    -The workload was extremely intense, especially considering how little content writers are paid. I found myself to be overworked, drained and stressed constantly.
    -There's a lot of pomp and circumstance with nothing to show for it, sometimes. I think mgmt has good intentions and wants nothing but to keep the company alive, thriving and to give employees the things they want in need. But to be honest, I think they were more concerned with lying to themselves and using millennial "work perks" to assuage the glaring issues at bay.

    Advice to Management

    I can't say much fairly because I haven't worked there in a year. But I will say that I hope you continue to value your employees and look for ways to help them grow, even when that means helping them move on to elsewhere. And cut the frivolity. The adage "work smarter not harder" applies well here. You don't need a million "work perks" when your employees are getting what they need.

  3. Helpful (3)

    "Account Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Marketing Manager/Account Manager in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Marketing Manager/Account Manager in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout (More than a year)

    Pros

    good co workers and people to work with

    Cons

    a lot of work, no salary, commssion, not good management

    Advice to Management

    less testing, listenig to your workers and talking down to them

    HubShout Response

    Apr 18, 2017 – President

    Hi there. Thanks for posting your feedback. HubShout is a values-driven company that believes that "all voices should be heard." It sounds like you did not have a great experience with us, and for... More


  4. Helpful (2)

    "Parties used to mask real issues"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Web Developer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Web Developer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    They hold many parties a year with wings and beer.
    In a trendy part of the city with lots of good lunch options.
    Decent working atmosphere with few distractions makes it easy to concentrate on work.
    Some people are cool.

    Cons

    OSHA would have a field day if they inspected their "office." When I was there, there were only 2 single bathrooms. Seriously, two bathrooms for 50 people. There were regularly lines waiting to use the restroom. It was so bad that I l had to use the bathroom at KFC around the block a few times. We had a serious rainstorm and the open area on the first floor was flooded out and the building was clearly not fit for occupation because of the overwhelming moldy odor. Why they didn't send us home to work remotely is mind boggling.

    I only met the CEO once since he is down in Virginia, but he seemed like a pretty good guy, and stands in stark contrast to the president who is in the Rochester office. The president is probably the most cold and uncaring person I've ever had the displeasure of meeting. It's a small business, you'd think he might want to meet me and welcome me to the company, right? No, the first time he ever came down to talk to me was when something was wrong. The second time was right after I returned after being out sick for a few days. His words to me, and I'm paraphrasing here, were "good to see you back working again." I was in a bit of shock. No "how are you feeling?" or "hope you're feeling better." Nope, it's all about work and money for him. Honestly, I never thought it was possible for someone to have such a horrible personality until I met him. And in a small business, that counts a lot.

    The pay is horrible, and barely covers rent for a decent apartment, even in Rochester. I'd hate to think how people down in Virginia survive. And when you're starting they don't withhold takes or pay their half of social security, so get ready for a big tax bill.

     I didn't feel like I was overworked, but I know several people who were. Communication with my supervisor was good at first, but toward the end getting any help from him was like pulling teeth. I was let go for overlooking a minor edit and suddenly all the hard work I did for them was out the window. There was this long rant about how there was concern about my work for weeks, clients were making complaints over my work and it was costing business. Something I was never told of or given the chance to correct.

    It's quite obvious that they see their employees as totally disposable, don't care about their well being, and would rather take advantage of college students/recent graduates instead of retaining and nurturing talent. Bottom line....avoid at all costs.

    Advice to Management

    Quit taking advantage of college students, cut the parties and use that money to pay your employees what they deserve.

    HubShout Response

    Nov 3, 2016 – President

    Hello. Thanks for sharing your experiences. Our core values include collaboration, which means listening to all viewpoints. Before I even start to respond, I’d like to apologize. It is clear that... More


  5. Helpful (1)

    "Great Atmosphere, Tough Job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    Pros

    The atmosphere of the job is fantastic. It was apparent that Management cares about the happiness of their employees and appreciates the hard work that's being done. The pay rate was fair and everybody was very nice. The mission statement is also very respectable, with the goal of helping small "Main Street" business. All in all, it's a fantastic and friendly work environment.

    Cons

    Despite the friendly atmosphere, it's very silent in the office. Primary communication is through Google Hangouts, which is basically an Instant Messenger. It's also very much desk work -- you can spend hours at a time sitting at the same desk.

    Advice to Management

    The goal for writers is very intimidating -- there were a lot of good break activities to clear the mind, but I felt too crunched for time to ever utilize them.

    HubShout Response

    Apr 19, 2017 – President

    Thanks very much for your feedback. As you know, the opinions of HubShouters are critical to us - even after they move on to other jobs. Our culture has been growing strong because everyone here... More


  6. Helpful (9)

    ""Big Business" Disguised as a Startup"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Other employees are typically young professionals which can make the social aspect enjoyable. The title looks great on a resume. Writing did improve. Learned a lot about SEO.

    Cons

    The high turnover rate for writers and how long it has gone unresolved is thoroughly unsettling. Management acknowledges that there must be some problem behind it, and continues to ask for suggestions about what it is and how to resolve it.

    However, everyone is well aware the root problem is the absurd workload, at least in the long term, and yet it remains to be swept under the table by higher-ups.

    Employees in other departments are understandably hesitant to get to know new writers within their first few months considering they’ve seen so many come and go after just those few months, and in many cases only weeks.

    In my first two months of employment, four people left, and five people were hired. This all from a team of 10 to 12 writers.

    To make matters worse, management decided to increase the workload even further. This in and of itself is one thing, but management purposely worded the announcement to manipulate us into thinking the work load had been decreased from 48 tasks per week, to 45.

    In reality, depending on the meetings you had scheduled for that week, the quota had been raised to 50 tasks per week. During the few months I was there after the change, not once did management even utter “50”, in an attempt to keep up the charade.

    To top it off, they also added wordpress posting duties, which were interesting and useful experience, but were taking up more time that we didn't have.

    When the writers banded together to push for changes that would make the position more realistic, every easily solvable point was addressed, such as more workspace and free coffee. But these were only smoke-screens, seeing that no attempt was made by management to address the new quota: The biggest issue we put forward.

    Other important points, including the enormous stress from the workload and the health concerns it generated, were immediately brushed off with a simple,"well then you probably shouldn't work here." In individual cases, that may very well be the case. However, with multiple similar complaints, it should be obvious there is a major issue.

    If you are having trouble keeping up with the workload, their method of helping you get back on track is to essentially to toss you in a ditch and see if you can drag your way out, all while looming under the threat of immediate termination. If for some crazy reason that first stint doesn’t motivate you in the long term, they simply continue to dig the ditch deeper until success is practically unfeasible so they can push you out.

    If you are willing to put your integrity aside, you can definitely brown nose your way to the top and do very well at this company. No one could blame you considering the current scarcity of jobs, so more power to you.

    However, if sucking up isn’t your thing, you could also write complete dribble as long as you write a ton of it, and do just as well.

    On the other end of the spectrum, going out of the way to increase brand awareness and other higher-quality content creation strategies, which have been proven to be more effective than the shear quantity of keywords, will be seen as insubordination and laziness if the full quota is not always met.

    They say that quality is the staple of their business, but in the end, every employee is quantified only by a number on a spreadsheet.

    This all is able to happen thanks to the “inspirational,” but hollow words spewed by management. Many seem directly ripped from a TED talk which can be good, but only if you follow up and understand the true motivation behind the advice, rather than using it as a tool to make yourself look progressive.

    Upper management is open to listening to new ideas, feedback, and complaints, but that doesn’t always mean the issues will be addressed. Higher-ups even attempt to reassure you are being heard by documenting what you say word-for-word during meetings. However, I came to realize that your words were often later used against you as well.

    Some of management is well educated in business psychology, which is obvious from the cheap business tactics used to manipulate employees they want to get rid of into believing they had, “had no choice but to punish/fire you.”

    This is so common, that they are able to boast a very low rate of actual termination. However, this is only because they make the work so difficult for those that are struggling, that naturally they will quit before they can be fired.

    I don't necessarily want to blame all of management for this, because it's obvious their hands are tied in some of these situations. No one can really afford to lose their job nowadays.

    The bottom line is that high writer turnover is essentially ingrained in their business strategy at this point. They have a constant line of potential hires ready to fill any vacancy that may occur. Because finding a writing position or entry-level job in general is so difficult, they know they can continue to do this for the foreseeable future.

    Although, if you feel you can write mindlessly all-day everyday, then go for it. This is probably a good job for you.

    As you may have noticed, there is a surprising disparity in reviews for the writing positions, always being rated at either a one-two star, or a five star. Considering this is a content generating company, it’s pretty safe to say the majority of positive reviews are either fake or an attempt by former employees at getting a better reference in the future.

    Just more shady business tactics.

    The owners come from a long history of working with big businesses, and are using the same strategies at a small startup. If they remain on this trend, they may very well be headed for disaster.

    It would already seem they have backed themselves into a corner where they can’t afford to lower the quota anymore. Apparently constantly losing and training new employees makes up for it? The writers, the ones making the actual product, are seriously undervalued, as well as exploited.

    There’s no room for empathy in big business. Even with just 50 employees, you won’t receive much at HubShout either.

    Advice to Management

    Employees are more than a number on a spreadsheet.

    HubShout Response

    May 3, 2016 – President

    Hi there. We were very sorry to read your review. As you pointed out, we are listening very closely to all feedback and believe strongly that all voices should be heard. We are also sorry that... More


  7. "Good workplace for the right kind of person"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at HubShout full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    HubShout has a good office culture, nice and relaxed casual atmosphere. It's an open office, so people know each other and there are intermittent awards given out, birthday parties, team lunches, and professional development meetings. If you're a writer, you eventually get the chance to be able to work from home pretty much any time. Everyone's very communicative and motivated, and there's very little pressure from management as long as you stay ahead of your quota, and management is very understanding and supportive of employees. There are clear expectations that apply to everyone and it's a comfortable atmosphere.

    Cons

    The kind of work that HubShout specializes in is a particular form of copywriting that can be challenging to crank out at the quota they expect. There's not a lot of upward mobility for writers, unless you switch into a job on the business or technical side. Pay isn't bad considering the work, but it's not much of a long-term salary. However, these aspects are more than made up for by HubShout's progressive workplace culture and the fact that it's actually a steady full-time job in writing.

    Advice to Management

    None, keep up the great work

    HubShout Response

    Jan 11, 2016 – President

    HI! And thanks so much for taking the time to give us your feedback and for the positive review. We greatly value our team at HubShout because we know they make this place so special... We are super... More

  8. Helpful (1)

    "Wasn't Right for Me, Might Be for Someone Else"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Premium Content Writer in Rochester, NY

    I worked at HubShout full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The best thing about HubShout, hands down, is the people working there. They're smart and funny and weird in the best possible way. It's a casual office culture (no really, you can wear your sweatpants), which wasn't a particular draw for me, but might be for others. Management is also pretty good at listening to concerns, and I saw the working environment get about 10 times better just in the year that I was working there. Writers can also work from home under certain conditions, which was a major perk for me -- especially in winter! Leadership is also really open to you doing cool little side projects, which can break up the routine and allow you to use past experience or unique skill sets in a different context.

    I also have to give a shout-out to Adam, the president of the company, who I think handled a recent crisis extraordinarily well. When the writing team was completely overloaded, he was literally bringing us snacks to try to ease the burden. Not many company presidents would do that.

    Cons

    My job wasn't a bad job, it just wasn't a good fit for me. I didn't feel the writing quota was difficult to reach, but I found it really difficult to stay motivated because I just didn't like what I was doing. Coming from journalism, I felt that some of the tactics were a little sketchy; however, within the arena of content marketing, HubShout is pretty admirable and solidly in white-hat territory. The pay felt low to me because it was actually less than I was making prior to grad school, but it's not bad for entry level -- management is pretty up front about it being an entry-level job, and it's not their fault I took it despite being technically overqualified. I will say that there isn't much of a promotion track just because of the nature of the work, but I probably wouldn't have stayed much longer anyway because I wouldn't have been happy even with a better-paying job in online marketing.

    Due to my general unhappiness in the field, I let little frustrations get overwhelming, but I think they're the kind of little frustrations (inefficiency, miscommunication) that you'll have in any working environment. My leaving for another job is truly an it's-not-you-it's-me situation. I really hated this job and found it soul-crushing, but I guess that's not surprising since I took a job in a field that I didn't actually want to work in.

    Advice to Management

    There are two things that would have made a big difference to me:

    1) Sick days. You have to use PTO when you're sick, which means that a lot of people just don't stay out of the office. Then the germs spread and everybody is sick and miserable and probably not as productive as they could be. I would have been perfectly happy to take unpaid sick days, and it was never satisfactorily explained to me why that wasn't an option (since it wouldn't cost the company anything).

    2) Quarterly bonuses. While the Christmas bonus I got last year was, indeed, very generous, I didn't like that the promise of a yearly bonus was wielded as basically the standard response to every question about low pay or motivation to go above and beyond. While I left HubShout unexpectedly due to a spur-of-the-moment opportunity, I was already planning to resign before the holidays. I was still trying to do more than the minimum purely for ethical reasons, but it is tough to see that once-a-year bonus as a real motivator in a company where there's pretty high turnover.

    Other than that, keep doing what you're doing, especially with the team-building efforts! I didn't get to say all this because I left so much more abruptly than I intended, but I truly wish everyone at HubShout the best.

    HubShout Response

    Sep 22, 2015 – President

    Hi there! Thanks so much for this detailed feedback. We greatly appreciate it and will be sharing it with our management team. Yeah - the recent backlog of work was very stressful, but I was... More


  9. Helpful (3)

    "The real review, not a monthly fake review with 5 stars. Just check the history."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - SEO Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - SEO Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The Company is a great start up company, for what it has done so far. 9-6 M-F is a great schedule as well. I couldn't complain about the freedom. At 21 years old you can't complain about having a good start up job.

    Cons

    Your work, your ethic is all judged off a computer task system. No matter how hard you work or how much obstacles you had to deal with to finish your task, you still loose if something small is missing. There is just too many tasks going around for everyone to focus on the main things. If everything was a bit organized and not managed through a task system, then people would feel a little more appreciated. I understand the model behind it, but at the end of the day if management cant focus on its employees and focuses on the tasks than people don't feel appreciated.

    Advice to Management

    Try to slim down the tasks objectives and focus on helping the team and creating a team bonding. This way people can feel like they win together or lose together. You can micromanage off a task system.

    HubShout Response

    Sep 22, 2015 – President

    Hi there. First off, we appreciate all points of view, so thanks for sharing. It doesn't sound like you were happy here, and that is a serious disappointment. HubShout is a great place to work for... More


  10. Helpful (1)

    "Life at the Hub as a Premium Content Writer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Premium Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Perhaps one of the most notable perks about working at HubShout -- and one that nearly ever reviewer has mentioned -- is the casual, laid back atmosphere. They do not care how you dress, how many body modifications you have, or how you style your hair. It's refreshing to work for a company that doesn't attach your value as an employee -- or person -- to your appearance! However, what they DO care about is your work performance, level of professionalism, and job satisfaction. The owner of the company has always been adamant about this and is extremely open minded. Another plus is the ability to refine your existing skills and learn new ones. There are plenty of opportunities to learn, you simply have to ask. You may have to ask more than once, however if you're in good standing with the company, management will go out of their way to educate you. Though I was a content writer, I expressed great interest in learning more about the Google algorithm and SEO in general. Adam created an entire weekly "class" to teach me and anyone else who was interested simply because I requested to learn more. Treat HubShout as a career, and not simply a job and you'll be able to reap more benefits. Simply put, you get out what you put in.

    Cons

    Meeting the weekly quota was stressful at times. Again, by expressing this concern to management multiple times an entirely new system to offset the quota when warranted was created. Even so, the metrics required of writers were difficult to reach, however not at all impossible. As with many other workplaces, HubShout is a deadline-driven work environment. If you express your concerns to management early, it won't be a problem. In regards to pay, it's an entry level position that does pay slightly more than most. Work hard, meet your metrics, and you'll receive a sizable Christmas bonus that helps to offset the entry-level pay.

    Advice to Management

    Within the year I was employed as a full time employee at HubShout, there were several positive changes. Therefore, I cannot give any parting advice to management because they've already implemented a lot of the changes I requested. My advice to current and future employees is be assertive and professional. Express your concerns or difficulties in articulately and reasonably and management will literally bend over backwards to ensure you succeed!

    HubShout Response

    Jul 23, 2015 – President

    Hi! And THANKS for the 5-star review. I greatly appreciate the time you took to give us such a thoughtful write-up. 2015 has really been about making this a GREAT PLACE TO WORK - and I'm so... More


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