IATA Reviews | Glassdoor

IATA Reviews

Updated May 23, 2017
117 reviews

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2.9
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Alexandre de Juniac
2 Ratings

117 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Management, especially senior management (in 14 reviews)

  • Management by fear and blame culture (in 7 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (3)

    "IATA: Good on paper: terrible in practice. An overhaul is long overdue!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Miami, FL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Miami, FL
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    Good benefits (healthcare, vacation/time off) and networking opportunity. The people are dedicated even though they often feel resentment toward the company and its "ways."

    Cons

    Inconsistent promotion standards. Hypocrytical when applying mission/vision statements. They expect 100% dedication without reciprocation. Salaries are below average when compared to similar positions in other companies. No true leadership vision and no planning.

    Advice to Management

    Set an attainable vision for the company and develop a plan to achieve it. Treat employees fairly. A title does not guarantee competency. Don't be so scared to get rid of the incompetent people in the company. Shifting them to other positions does not cure the problem.


  2. Helpful (3)

    "A demoralizing, paralytic and discriminatory place to work."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Miami, FL
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Miami, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at IATA full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Twenty days vacation, good health dental and vision, and good 401k plan. Okay discounts on hotels and such. Standby travel.

    Cons

    Management leads by fear. Humiliation and retaliation are the game at IATA. This is a rigid organization touting innovation, yet fettered by its insistence on complicating even the simplest process.

    Advice to Management

    Simplify


  3. Helpful (5)

    "Do not work at IATA"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    - the people I worked with are very talented and wornderful
    - alot of opportunity to travel and work internationally

    Cons

    - the management are not leaders, they are often people promoted based on skills but have no leadership abilities they do not know how to motivate, communicate, empower
    - there is alot of favoritism which creates unfairness in who get promoted
    - ever since the current DG came into the company it has progressively become a horrible place to work - created a culture of fear and in the process eliminated many very good people
    - the are alot of politics - do not treat women fairly
    - they do not provide the employees with the right tools to do their jobs properly
    - people are not set up for success

    Advice to Management

    - create a proper leadership development program and give people time to succeed. Try coaching and motivating rather than using fear to gain results


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  5. Helpful (5)

    "Brought more knowledge & experience to them then any received in return."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    Further broadened my international profile in my work experience.
    Worked with an excellent team of knowledgeable piers.
    USED TO BE an excellent & enviable organization to be involved with.

    Cons

    The culture of change that was brought into IATA several years ago was introduced as positive and benefical to the growth of its knowledgeable staff. That ruse was just to give employees a false sense of belief that IATA wanted to nurture its staff and bring in positive change. The truth was that IATA had no intention of keeping its experienced staff nor of mentoring staff. An arbitrary performance grading system only allowed for X% of employees to be rewarded and actually stipulated that X% of employees were to be "eliminated" every year - with bonuses to management for each position eliminated and/or employee terminated.

    So what they actually introduced was a culture of fear - one that stifled employees and turned co-worker against co-worker against management against leadership. There was no leadership as the fear that was instilled in the average employee was also instilled in management and leaders became followers and still are to this day.

    Leadership turned into dictatorship and the mantra changed from day to day, hour to hour therefore never knowing if what was directed yesterday was still valid today. For a no-for-profit organization, the only words ever heard were profits, margins, budgets - the whole concept of actually providing leadership and guidance to the airline community was at the end of the agenda and still is.

    Yes, it is understood that the airline industry is suffering financially but so are most all other industries. However, other industries not only look at cutting expenses but also look at customer and employee retention and satisfaction.

    Advice to Management

    The workforce is changing, the demographics of the workforce are rapidly changing and personal choice and options will be the driving force for employees. Unless and until IATA realizes that retention of employees is a valuable contribution to the future growth and success of this organization, they will have a very difficult time employing and retaining staff. More and more will employees be leaving my choice taking knowledge and experience with them.

    It's the human factor that makes a workplace successful however at IATA the human factor has been eliminated from their "human capital" policies - just referring to human beings as human capital defines the misdirected cultue at this once enviable work environment.


  6. Helpful (4)

    "A competent organization led by incompetent "leaders""

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    If you love aviation, this company will expose you to all facets of the business. You get to travel and the people who are non-management staff are excellent and a joy to work with. Salaries are great.

    Cons

    They are simply at the point where they no longer trust their employees or respect them for that matter. After several years of record revenues, they rewarded the staff by implementing a time clock environment whereby you need to log on in the morning and log out at night!!! Moral is at its lowest and the best people are leaving the company in groves. There is absolutely no leadership to speak of. No communication to its employees on matters of importance and they are focused on managing by fear. Just a great disappointment for what once was considered one of the best places to work in Montreal. By the way, office morale in Geneva is even worse!

    Advice to Management

    LEAVE. You preached to everyone over the past 8+ years of "Change" yet the same people at the top are still making the decisions even though non-management folks have either been fired or left. How many players do you trade before you look at the coaches or Managers??? If you focused on taking care of your employees as much as your VCPs, this would still be an amazing place to work!


  7. Helpful (6)

    "Employees not treated very well, but things will be better once the current DG and head of HR move on"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Manager in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Former Employee - Manager in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    - Good work environment (as in the office space itself)
    - Good benefits (everyone gets 5 weeks vacation)
    - International exposure and travel opportunities
    - Still some incredible people working at IATA (althought many have been let go over the past 10 years)

    Cons

    - Employees are treated as an expendable resource, overworked until burnout and then just replaced with a new batch of eager employees that don't know what they are getting themselves into. One employee literally died at his desk working late one night. Senior management barely took any regard to this catastrophic event.

    - Employees are shipped over from other countries even for low level clerical positions so that they can be given tax-free status. This allows IATA to pay less for their salary cost and lets the employee receive more (cutting out the Governments share for taxes). This also instills fear and a high pressure to perform on the employee who if fired would literally be shipped back home as they would have no citizenship rights.

    - There is an air of animosity between local employees and ones from out of country due to the big salary differences resulting from not being taxed. This in effect creates a class system at IATA, and results in a typical situation of a manager getting paid less than a subordinate.

    Advice to Management

    Have a heart! Please start seeing employees as human beings. Some day, IATA might lose it's tax-free status and you will no longer be able to motivate people with fear.


  8. Helpful (4)

    "Bad Work Environment"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    International Exposure
    Lots of great talent

    Cons

    To much good talent without being able to take any decisions.
    The DG "CEO" needs to review and approve every decision including all hires in the company must be approved by him

    Advice to Management

    Get rid of your HR VP


  9. Helpful (8)

    "IATA is like a political dictatorship or cult: outside appearances are not true representations of what it's really like"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Current Employee - Manager in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    The nature of the organisation enables you to communicate with offices and colleagues around the world, and the staff come from every corner of the globe. The IATA brand used to be very strong and prestigious worldwide, but it's losing strength and word is getting out about how difficult things are inside the organisation. You learn a lot about your personal strength and tolerance for things you don't agree with -- in other words, IATA is a tough place to work and if you've survived IATA, you can probably survive any other employer. The pay is OK and time off is OK (5 weeks). People you meet at IATA will be your friends for many years to come, and once you leave IATA, there is an active group of former employees called the Alumni Club that gets together regularly for social events and your friendships last for decades.

    Cons

    1/Turnover is significant -- estimated at 80%+ in the past 5 years in Montreal, where there are only about 300 full-time staff.
    2/Staff are routinely terminated without warning and without cause and offered generous buyout packages in exchange for their rights to pursue legal action for their terminations.
    3/Company "values" appear on slick posters within the building, but yet they're contradicted every day by senior management in their actions and routine staff terminations, lowering staff morale.
    4/Because of the high turnover, there is a significant knowledge gap. Staff leave, and their replacements either don't have the right skill set and/or airline experience/knowledge, forcing other team members to pick up the slack. This costs the company expertise, time and money, and gives existing employees a never-ending headache as if they're in a revolving door that won't stop.
    5/The reputation for IATA within Montreal has unfortunately worked against people in their lives after IATA. Certain employers will not invite ex-IATA staff for interviews because of the poor local reputation of IATA. We employees are viewed as "spoiled milk" and considered "tainted goods" -- but we, the hardworking employees, truly don't deserve to be branded as such.

    Advice to Management

    1/Realise that some day you may be working for us and we shouldn't be treated as a number or as an easily replaceable resource. Actually, given the issues with turnover and knowledge gaps, we really aren't easily replaceable... so for the good of the airline industry, stop terminating good employees who are knowledgable and productive.

    2/Sooner or later the Provincial and/or Federal Government will take notice of the turnover and employee complaints -- and some employees won't sign away their rights for legal action when you terminate them without cause. Beware of that day because we've been voicing our concerns and dissatisfaction which has sadly fallen upon deaf ears within IATA.

    3/Your employees may actually have more industry experience than you do. Value them and what they bring to the table. IATA is a non-profit organisation that serves its members (airlines) - it is not a Wall-Street for-profit company with shareholders to please... do what's best for your members, and only that.


  10. Helpful (4)

    "Sad to see what IATA has become over the last years: a dictatorship without hope for anyone to be treated fairly"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    -International work experience

    -Good vacation (5 weeks) and good benefits

    Cons

    - Too powerful HR department. HR (or HC, "Human Capital" as they call it) rules IATA.

    - Promotions do not take place based on competence but rather based on absolute obedience of those that are promoted. Good people tend to leave when they suddenly need to report to a superior who doesn't have a clue but exercises authority without the necessary work experience.

    - A, B, C rating system of employees where only 20% of employees can get rewarded. Good and solid employees who never make it to B+ or A never get a salary raise and no adjustment for cost of living. Many employees have not had a cost of living adjustment over the last 5 to 10 years. Rewards of B+ employees seems arbitrary - some do and some don't get a raise.

    - Expatriates do not pay income tax and have a considerably higher paycheck than their peers from Canada (creates inequality and jealousy amongst staff).

    - Yearly lay-offs of competent staff for reasons that are unknown to victims and colleagues. Lay-offs are not linked to performance nor to scores in performance appraisals.

    - Expats are hired and fired again without respect for the consequences (many have family / children and go back to nothing when they need to leave IATA and Canada shortly after they were hired).

    - A non-negligible number of female employees has seen their positions cut during maternity leave.

    - Considerable work overload of employees due to regular firings without handover or previous planning. Employees are blamed when they cannot reach the objectives of their own position plus the job of one or several ex-colleagues that were all imposed to them in addition to their own workload. Creates anxiety and panic. Lack of control at all levels because hardly anyone can master the workload of the several job positions that they are responsible for.

    - It is obvious that the regular lay-offs and re-training of new staff just to lay off others or the new people right away necessarily costs more than simply coaching existing qualified employees. Why are so many competent people let go at high cost to IATA and the airlines?

    - Individuals that get laid off tend to get high level jobs with good salary and benefits afterwards. It is a shame that they need to be let go from IATA to be professionally recognized elsewhere.

    - IATA seems to favor young MBAs without experience over employees with airline and/or professional experience. This creates an overly commercial work environment where short-term profits become more important than long-term sustainability. Professional experience is valued less than commercial education. Young, confident, know-it-all? Welcome to IATA! Professional with industry experience and good work attitude? Forget it, you'll get frustrated or laid off.

    - Bad work atmosphere. People are unhappy and many employees want to leave, in spite of high salaries.

    - Check-in/ check-out system where employees of all salary bands and responsibility levels need to arrive and leave each day at the same time, although many employees work daily with suppliers/ clients/ partners in other time zones, where flexible work hours would help both employer and employee.

    - IATA tends to make their employees' life difficult: overly heavy approval procedures for contracts and POs, projects, new products, even vacation! They pretend to be hiring dynamic people that like to overcome obstacles and implement change, but make exactly these people's lives miserable by constantly putting unnecessary obstacles in their way.

    Advice to Management

    Management is not at the right place. Current management would be good in politics of autocratic countries, the army or any structure where power and absolute authority are an asset. This is certainly not the case for a business management position. Most of the competent management have been laid off due to "non-obedience" or impossibility to reach exorbitant targets year over year.

    IATA looks forward to new leadership.


  11. Helpful (5)

    "The Worst Ever !!!!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Director
    Former Employee - Director
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    IATA carries a great brand name, and is representing 95% of the carriers worldwide.
    IATA is present in 130 locations worldwide.

    Cons

    It is an egocentric company, driven by incompetent lunatics, only thinking about themselves and their little empire.
    In addition, the management is control-freak and most of the staffs is working under threat.

    If you keep quiet and do not try to think outside of the box and suck up your boss - you should be doing well.

    With IATA it is not important to win - just do not make waves.

    Advice to Management

    Tony Tyler is taking over from Giovanni Bisignani. It is a good move as finally IATA is not getting a CEO coming from a bankrupt airline.
    Tony get rid off the old guard in Montreal and Geneva, and identify competent managers with real leadership and team spirit.


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