IBM Information Engineer Reviews | Glassdoor

IBM Information Engineer Reviews

2 reviews

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Information Engineer

3.9
StarStarStarStarStar
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
IBM CEO Virginia Rometty
Virginia Rometty
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Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • You have to manage your work life balance or you'll end up doing the work of 2 or more people (in 925 reviews)

  • Long hours like everwhere elses (in 441 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Great company, great job/career, Russian roulette for US workers."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer - Information Development in Rochester, MN
    Former Employee - Software Engineer - Information Development in Rochester, MN
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at IBM full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    The people are of the highest caliber! The pay and benefits are great. Severance package is really good.

    Cons

    Big company means a lot of red tape sometimes. Constant layoffs for US folks.


  2. Helpful (1)

    "Ridiculous employee evaluation process, bad place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Information Engineer in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Information Engineer in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    When they acquired us, they grandfathered out PTO accrual from the former company, which was better than what most IBM employees accrued.
    Leaving.

    Cons

    There were rumors of mandatory employee attrition percentage and the evaluation process made that believable. My manager told me senior management was requiring her to cut one employee and I drew the short straw.
    Morale was poor.
    Lots of wasteful meetings.

    Advice to Management

    Be more honest. Be leaders and not paper pushers. Think of employees as humans, not as corporate assets.