IDS (International Decision Systems) "executive team" Reviews | Glassdoor

IDS (International Decision Systems) Employee Reviews about "executive team"

Updated Jan 29, 2019

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Found 58 reviews

3.4
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Rating TrendsRating Trends
64%
Recommend to a Friend
47%
Approve of CEO
IDS (International Decision Systems) CEO David Hamilton (no image)
David Hamilton
2 Ratings
Pros
  • "Good Working Environment, Good Facilities, Learning environment(in 6 reviews)

  • "(in 5 reviews)

Cons
  • "The executive team all have an ownership stake in the company now and it's all about the return on THEIR investments(in 4 reviews)

  • "There is not yet a 401k match but I know that this has been in the works for awhile(in 4 reviews)

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Reviews about "executive team"

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  1. Helpful (3)

    "IDS gives software companies a bad name - Customers and Employees don't matter"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Executive In Minneapolis, MN in Minneapolis, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IDS (International Decision Systems) full-time

    Pros

    Aging but sticky customer base

    Cons

    No work life balance, no training, micro management by executive team. Customers and employees are viewed by executive team as a necessary evil.

    Advice to Management

    Management will not consider advice of customers or employees

    IDS (International Decision Systems)2019-01-29
  2. Helpful (4)

    "Avoid at all cost - 1 star is too generous"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Project Manager in Minneapolis, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at IDS (International Decision Systems) full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Good client base and software offering.

    Cons

    IDS is an extremely toxic environment where only a select few have input on anything. There is no trust in their people to do anything. The executive team all have an ownership stake in the company now and it's all about the return on THEIR investments. Staff is mistreated and overworked to make a buck and the clients see this too. IDS does not have the ability to sustain a revenue stream into the future as the... competition is gaining on them.

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    Advice to Management

    There needs to be a major cultural shift in the company in order to survive. Start caring about your customers and your people first, then everything else can begin to fall into place. All stakeholders in the company should not be involved with the customers and put together a long-term plan. Right now there is nothing.

    IDS (International Decision Systems)2017-11-01
  3. Helpful (8)

    "Long slow decline"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IDS (International Decision Systems) full-time

    Pros

    There are some excellent employees and a lot of loyalty among a group that has been together for 10, 15, or more years. There is also a lot of flexibility related to work hours and working from home. Unfortunately this flexibility is more due to the lack of HR policy or any workforce management process, than it is any identifiable employee-centered policies.

    Cons

    There are no new customers coming in the door (when is the last time a new customer has signed on to use IDS products?) so the company focus is to look for new ways to pull revenue out of the same old shrinking customer base. This is a recipe for a long slow decline. Just ask any of those 10-20 year veterans and they'll tell you how big and dynamic the company used to be. The executive team spends much of their day... attending tactical meetings and there continues to be a lack of a strategic plan being built or executed on. Layoffs continue at a trickle and any employee with less than 5 years tenure is a potential casualty. Meanwhile, the long tenured veterans are used to seeing a continual parade of new executives so they simply duck and wait for current initiatives to pass as they wait out the inevitable next round of executive turn over. All of this creates an atmosphere where change happens slowly, if it happens at all. People are correct when they mention how busy it is. However this pace isn't due to the pains of a growing business. It is due to a stagnate or slowly shrinking base of employees trying to manage their work load in an atmosphere where costs are being managed so tightly things like technology and other time savors are being thrown to the curb in favor of old school busy work.

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    Advice to Management

    A business model centered on lowering costs and farming the same customers in hopes they continue to resist change (and competitors) will continue the long slow decline. Focus on strategy and finding ways to grow the customer base (perhaps by developing new products, not just upgrades to existing ones).

    IDS (International Decision Systems)2016-12-19
  4. Helpful (9)

    "Tale of Two Companies (Avoid if you can...)"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Minneapolis, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at IDS (International Decision Systems) full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    IDS is the tale of two companies: A market leader that offers a stellar product currently unmatched by any competitors, one that is starting to make better decisions that will keep IDS on the upswing for some time to come, AND a company that doesn't know how to address an increasing morale issue, high-turnover, and an age gap that keeps knowledge in silos. I think they are starting to make better business... decisions that should see them on the up-swing. They hired a new CTO and he is working on a better release model. He is also listening to the working managers and making decisions that will help going forward. The biggest pro is the people. For the most part, the people you work with are wonderful, smart, and make the place worthwhile. Because of the cons at IDS, it is easy for everyone to have the same mentality to work and the culture. You soon realize that a lot of you are in this together. The work is challenging. There is no training, so you are immediately placed in a sink or swim environment. If you can utilize others around you, try to work above the toxic environment, and meet (or even exceed) your expectations, then you will walk away with more experience in 3 years than you usually gain in 5. If you're a self-starter, then you can really manage your brand and your work. Managers don't seem to care much for your development, so it falls on you. If you're good at managing your work and time well, then people will recognize those skills. The EAC (events and activities committee or something) is a group that sets up fun happy hours and parties. Those events can help make the job really fun. Good benefits, especially now that there is (finally) a 401k match. Good working from home options.

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    Cons

    Where to begin... Moving #11 first because I think it is important. 11) Last but not least, they are using outdated software and creating a lot of Technical Debt. This is a problem and will bite them in the butt soon! 1) there is no training at all, none. The company develops and supports a leasing software. So you might expect there to be both Leasing training (for those that don't have a leasing or... financial background), training for your actual position, and then a training on the software itself. But there is no training. You have to learn all these things on your own, but then there is no one to help tell you if you're getting it or not. This is a HUGE problem for the company. It can explain the high-turnover (because people aren't set up for success to actually perform their job, so either their self-confidence falls or they don't know how to actually do their job), which leads to a toxic environment. Then more work falls on the people that stay or know what they are doing, so they become too bogged down to be able to teach anyone anything. Often times your workload will go up but your deadlines or expectations stay the same. So you constantly feel like you have a mountain of work to do. 2) There is a significant age gap in the company. You either have people that have been at IDS for 15-20 years or you have people that have been there for less than 5. So when there are company events, the attendance is abysmal. And this again creates a toxic environment and tension between the groups due to a bottleneck when it comes to sharing knowledge. The people that have been there for 15-20 years keep their knowledge to themselves as a way to remain indispensable, fearing they will be let go (just look at the BA team where you have really knowledgeable experts that don't want to help you out). So the newer people rarely get trained (see #1) because no one wants to share the information. This creates an interesting culture both socially and work-wise. 3) Management will do everything in their power to please the customers, even at the expense of the employees and company morale. Here's an example: IDS will tell clients that the last day to submit an issue to a patch is on 10/1/16 (just an example). Then on 10/9/16, a few days before the patch is supposed to go out, a client will complain about an issue or several issues and to please the client, IDS will re-open the patch and include those issues. Developers have to do more work on a patch they thought was ready to go out, Support has to work with the client on these issues and forgo working on pressing issues, and then everyone has to refocus their work on those issues. But then management won't communicate this decision to the rest of the company. This creates resentment across multiple teams for having to do more work on a patch everyone thought was closed. Note: I am not saying that it isn't good for management/company to please its clients, but to not communicate this across the impacted teams is not a good sign. 4) There is a general sense that no one cares about the actual employees. Things are not properly communicated. Or execs will say one thing in the all hands meeting, and then do another. Management and even the board knows about the morale problem at IDS, but they have not addressed it in years. This means that either management does not care about the morale problem, it isn't a high priority (so we continue to bleed talent), or they don't know how to address it. 5) It seems that most people are underpaid vs the industry standard. When I spoke to my boss about my salary not being competitive vs what I am seeing in the industry, their response was "of course we aren't competitive." It is a fact that we underpay employees. What is interesting, however, is that a few executives don't actually live in Minnesota. So IDS pays for them to fly in and out every week, and they pay for their hotel rooms every week. So think about that for a second. Think about being told by a boss that "we don't have the money for" X, but that we are paying for the CTO to fly in and out of Chicago or San Fran every week. And that we are paying for their hotel room. Needless to say, they're not staying in a Holiday Inn Express. 6) Executive team hires their friends and not the more qualified option. In my 3-4 years at the company, we hired a handful of new executives, all of which either worked with the CEO in the past or were friends with trhe CEO. And recently the COO position was given to an existing exec that was already stretched too thin, putting more pressure on already struggling teams. 7) HR doesn't seem to actually do anything besides benefits. There isn't even an employee satisfaction or engagement survey (we had 1 in my 3-4 years at the company and it was only when we asked for one that we got it). 8) No one cares about your personal development. They only care about what you can do for them, even if it isn't something that fits your job or your career. 9) Management plays favorites way too often. Going back to the age gap, another problem exists and it is that of tenure. There are a lot of poor managers that have been there for 15+ years that seem to get special treatment, even though they can't see the forest from the trees. They make bad decisions, or they are too affraid to stand up to their friends in higher positions and fight for what is right. 10) Some people are really unprofessional. Piggy-backing off #9, the people that have been at IDS the longest tend to become demanding, rude, and unprofessional. They think that they can get by being like that because they have been there the longest. They have this feeling of being "untouchable" which only breeds worse behavior. 11) Last but not least, they are using outdated software and creating a lot of Technical Debt. This is a problem and will bite them in the butt soon!

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    Advice to Management

    Take the time to address the morale issue. Actually look at the problem and work with employees to make solutions. Stop caring only about the customers. Stand up for your product. When it needs work, or it needs X to be fixed, listen to the developers and take their advice (for example, releasing 1 major release in a year where there is more risk of putting too much in vs. releasing 2 major releases and... splitting the work). There needs to be training for your product, your job, and the industry. This is a must! You need to invest in an actual training department. Take the time to focus on support, not PS. PS is burning to the ground already, let it burn, and focus on the talent in Support. Communicate more often and be more open/honest about what is going on. Don't say one thing in an all-hands meeting and then do another in practice. Don't make "budget" an excuse when the executives are flown in each week, get "manager breakfasts," and get to stay in hotel suites each week. Recognize that you are a 30-year-old company, not a startup. Hire more people! Everyone is overworked, every department is understaffed. Clean house where you need to. If there are managers that don't actually do anything, or make poor decisions, don't reward them because they have been there the longest.

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    IDS (International Decision Systems)2016-11-21
Found 58 reviews