IGI Global Reviews | Glassdoor

IGI Global Reviews

Updated Sep 5, 2019

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Found 46 reviews

1.9
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14%
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21%
Approve of CEO
IGI Global CEO Dr. Mehdi Khosrow-Pour (no image)
Dr. Mehdi Khosrow-Pour
36 Ratings
  1. "Many Positions"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous in Hershey, PA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at IGI Global full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Really good benefits and a many chances to learn everything about publishing and business

    Cons

    Has a very fast work pace

    Advice to Management

    Keep bringing in top notch employees that makes this a great place to work

    IGI Global2018-10-21
  2. Helpful (7)

    "*insert poop emoji*"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Journal Development Editor in Hershey, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IGI Global full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The only pros I can think of are: - The income you'll receive twice a month. - The friends you might make working here. - Casual dress code (jeans, hoodies, sneakers, etc.).

    Cons

    Well, management is full of con artists. Ha-ha-ha. I would say "all jokes aside", but management IS one. I've received better management and direction as a dishwasher. Work here ONLY if: - You desperately need to make money and don't mind being underpaid. As an employee of more than three years, I was never able to reach $30,000 per year. Apparently this is far below industry standard. Strange, considering... the CEO can afford luxury cars and several homes. - You have just obtained a degree and are desperately in need of some sort of work experience. You are better off doubling your daily commute for a better position elsewhere that will provide you with more useful experience and a better, more deserved pay. I suggest keeping your options open even if you accept a position here. - You are okay with not actually learning about the publishing industry and are content with doing what you're told without asking questions simply because you're told to do it. - You don't mind your concerns as a seasoned employee being overlooked on a regular basis. Despite being on the front lines and enduring consistent problems with obvious solutions, you will not be seen as an intelligent individual with progressive ideas, but rather another worker bee whose sole purpose is to collect as much pollen as possible so the queen bees can reap all the honey for themselves. - You are comfortable with the mile-high turnover rate that prevents anyone from actually advancing anywhere without getting lucky. When you first start, 40% of the employees you will meet will have only been there a few months, and another 40% will only be there for another few months. The other 20% are either people who are vying to survive or are management. You will be expected to know and follow procedures that are constantly altered, even if you have only been there a few weeks and are still learning. After just barely getting these procedures down, you will have newly hired co-workers who will rely on you to teach them procedures that you barely understand, and soon afterwards the procedures will be changed anyway. Prepare to be reprimanded for not being an expert on these rules. - You are content with being part of a system that focuses on quantity over quality by leaps and bounds. As other reviews have stated, this is a vampire press that is only concerned with churning out as much butter as possible, regardless of how chunky, spoiled, or rancid it might be. This inedible product is typically made from milk produced by starving cows that have resorted to eating their own manure. Self-plagiarism is ever-rampant, yet somehow the farmer convinces the townsfolk to spread it on their toast every morning. It is overpriced and worth half as much as the next guy's. (I have now made two food analogies writing this review. The catharsis I feel in actually being able to express my disdain for this company has given me more life than I ever thought possible while working here. Please continue reading.) - You are comfortable navigating communication which is feeble at best. No one ever knows who to include on what emails or who should take care of what. Because new employees are always hired, new positions are created every six months and removed six months later, so you are constantly trying to figure out what title so-and-so holds and whether or not they are taking care of such-and-such responsibility this month as compared to the last. You will also not be warned about rules you are breaking until you have already done it enough times to find yourself waist-deep in trouble, at which time you will be sat down behind a closed door like a child in the principal's office. - You can handle answering to a manager who uses phrases like "come to fruitition" and "beat a horse to death", as well as other general PR babble that is used as meaningless responses to help deflect attention away from your legitimate concerns. Some English majors may not be able to shake the frustration of incorrect pronunciations and sugarcoated rubbish, so heed my warning all you dead poets. - You are a-okay with being micromanaged. No explanation needed.

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    Advice to Management

    Read the reviews, take them as tips, and learn from them. When your soldiers in the trenches say "I'm out of bullets", you don't tell them to try pulling the trigger again, you find a new mode of attack. Don't butter up your employees by telling them they are an asset to your company and then disregard their opinions. Let them make their own decisions and trust in their capabilities. Otherwise, success will never be... reached. Oh, and to the CEO: stop falling asleep in meetings.

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    IGI Global2018-01-29
  3. "A lot has apparently changed: Great Opportunity"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at IGI Global full-time

    Pros

    Overall, there is a lot of room for growth. Although there are a lot of negative reviews on Glassdoor, IGI Global is growing and the environment has changed from over the previous years. This company is great for anyone looking to gain experience. If you are able to manage your time, prioritize deadlines and have enthusiasm, this company is a great opportunity for you! There are a lot of young rising talent in... the office.

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    Cons

    Sometimes there can be the difficulty of hierarchy, but it is not unlike any corporate setting. Additionally, at first the working environment can seem quiet and no one really talks to each other, but once you settle into the office, you will make the acquittances of coworkers.

    IGI Global2017-11-08
  4. Helpful (6)

    "There Are Much Better Options."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Editorial Assistant in Hershey, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IGI Global full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    - When I was there, there was flexible scheduling, so you could arrive at anytime between 7:30 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. and work your 8 hour shift. From what I understand, now you must clock in and out at a designated time, so flexible scheduling may not be an option anymore. - Once a month, there is an "Employee Appreciation Luncheon" offered to the staff. On occasion they ask the employees to bring a dish of their own... rather than providing the meal. On those days I recommend you just bring your own lunch and eat at your desk, rather than having to pay to feed 50 employees out of your own pocket.

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    Cons

    - Salary is well below the industry average. I was tasked with running an entire imprint one month after I started as an Editorial Assistant in the Acquisitions division. I was doing Acquisitions, sending and reviewing Contracts, Development, and some pre-Production work for almost a year with no pay raise or title change. The Managing Director of the company stated they would be performing an evaluation after six... months and adjusting my salary at that time, but it never happened. Once they decided to get rid of that imprint, they again said I would have an evaluation and title change review based on my previous work, which still never came. By the time I resigned, three managers of the Acquisitions department had quit and I was next in line. I stated I was not interested in taking on anymore responsibility without compensation for my extra work, and I was told that an evaluation and title change review would come in six months once they were able to see my progress, but that I should keep in mind that some departments do not really need a manager in title, so the evaluation may come to nothing. As far as I know, in speaking with my co-workers, raises do not happen often for lower employees, if at all, so be prepared to have the same basic salary that you are hired with for quite a few years. - Transparency is a huge issue. People would come and go extremely quickly, and management felt it best not to announce the departures, just in case anyone else felt they would like to leave, as well. They also never announced new ideas to the company, so when a new product or initiative was being introduced, many of the staff had no idea about it until they found out on their own. The flexible scheduling was also a transparency issue. Every few months, the management would ask that we clock in and out using a time clock. Then they would change their minds, tell us not to be "clock-watchers" and remove the time clock from the wall. They clearly wanted us to work over our 40 hour work week, but didn't want to have to pay us overtime. Interestingly enough, in one email sent to all company employees, the CEO's assistant told us that we must use the time clock because working over 40 hours as a salaried employee without being compensated was against the law. We used the time clock for a few weeks and then it was ripped out of the wall, with no explanation. It is back now, but that will most likely change in a month or two. - Company ethics were extremely lacking, as well. In one meeting, the head of Marketing explained that they don't bother marketing the books they deem "terrible material", and they were using a rating system to deem which books they would spend their time and materials on, and which were just "filler" in order to tell shareholders that they had met their projected numbers on. In Acquisitions, the department was always asked if we would recommend a book or not based on everything we knew about it (since we were the only ones that reviewed the books), and almost every book we reviewed and rejected was actually accepted by the CEO and upper-management since it would add to our yearly numbers goal (a goal made up by the CEO , and one changed often throughout the year). I cannot stress enough how much I would recommend potential authors and contributors to take their work elsewhere, so they can get the attention that they deserve. - The atmosphere is extremely tense. Upper-management does not encourage employees to bond or associate with each other. I cannot count the times I was working with my co-worker in our private office and someone came in to "check" how we were doing. This made both of us extremely uncomfortable, since the man who came to stand in our room with 5-10 minutes each time was the same man who was known to have made sexually inappropriate interactions with previous employees. All of the employees that I had spoken to preferred to keep quiet, work their eight hour shift, and leave as soon as possible. One of the biggest issues with the company as a whole stems from its inflexibility. Even small decisions need to be run through the CEO of the company, mainly because of his need to micro-manage, but the overwhelming suspicion is that this tactic originates from the fact that the business must be failing. The acquisition of new authors is unethical, the sales are low, authors compensated poorly, and the products are overpriced. These are just a few examples in the almost 2 years that I spent with the company. I have had the dream of working in the publishing industry since I was in school, and took this position at entry level to gain some experience and hopefully grow. Being constantly belittled, having no avenues for progression or mentorship of any kind, and experiencing such a tense and anxious culture has forced me to shift my career goals. I gave 9 working days resignation (1 day short of the two-week requirement), which I believe to be generous, considering our treatment. The very next day, I was walked out of the building like a common criminal, having no access to other employees (again, because of the fear of a mass walk-out). This is a message to current employees, who I believe have been told that I walked out without any notice given whatsoever. Please understand, reader - that this is not just the words of a 'disgruntled employee' - this is the internal dialogue of almost every employee that works at IGI Global. I urge any prospective candidates, or possible authors, to consider other companies in the industry. I truly wish everyone who works at IGI the very best, but some major changes need to be made before it becomes a successful, reputable publisher.

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    Advice to Management

    You don't build a business, you build people. And then the people build the business - Zig Ziglar.

    IGI Global2017-07-15
  5. Helpful (3)

    "Department I worked in had a very relaxing work environment (IT)."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Data Specialist in Hershey, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at IGI Global full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    First and foremost my director was and I'm sure still is an incredible leader. Boosted morale with humor and encouragement. He had the ability to give real time solutions for time sensitive critical issues. Freedom of work computer use allowed me to gain self taught experience I carried over to my current career.

    Cons

    Pay is extremely low across the board in all departments. Old school business tactics and poorly made products made for steadily decreasing revenue. Employee suggestions are either disregarded or stolen by higher ups. Training and career development are non existent. The only hope in advancing is waiting for managerial staff to leave and praying the quater did well so positions that others held wouldn't be dissolved.... Employee morale was the equivalent of prisoners getting outdoor time to break rocks in a shale pit. To be clear, I observed this in other departments not in my own. A testament to how capable my director was.

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    Advice to Management

    Dedicate time to employee training and development. Take consideration to their ideas and strategies to help improve the company. Raise salaries to industry standards. Doing this will keep hard working, faithful employees.

    IGI Global2016-10-28
  6. Helpful (14)

    "A Textbook Example of Mismanagement"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Development Editor in Harrisburg, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IGI Global full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Decent flex time and affordable benefits. Because of its terrible reputations—and the efforts of a very forward-thinking and proactive HR rep (who was fired for his efforts, when I worked there)—the company was essentially forced to offer these, in order to recruit new hires, which it has to do a lot, because of extraordinarily high turnover. That leads us to another pro: there is certainly room for advancement... (thanks to the constant and inevitable firings) but only in the sense that there's a lot of social mobility in Westeros, what with everyone getting assassinated constantly. If you're a sociopath with a Trump-ian level of narcissistic ambition, you could do very well for yourself here. Finally, the job looks good on a resume...provided your next prospective employer does not Google the company and wind up here!

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    Cons

    IGI is by far the most corrupt organization I've ever worked for, and I frankly wonder whether there might not be tax-fraud or some other kind of money-laundering scheme going on behind the scenes. This is a vampire press: they publish plagiarized material cobbled together by pseudo-academics with degrees from questionable (and often fictional) universities. All processes of peer review and quality control are... hopelessly compromised, and the result are frankenstein doorstops written in broken English, and the company's sole customer base consists of the oblivious libraries of the universities of the few legitimate academics snookered into contributing to their anthologies. But all this would be fine, if they treated their employees well. They don't. I've worked in warehouses where employees were treated better. Employees at IGI are screamed at in executive meetings, chastised for efforts to improve the quality of publications; entire departments are laid off without warning. You come in one day, and the KGB is ushering your friends out in black hoods, and you sit there bewildered, with an inbox stacked sixty emails deep, full of angry Indian PhD's who have just today realized they're being taken advantage of and are very mad about it. Run. Run far and fast. If you're a young college graduate, you may be incredibly flattered to receive an offer from a ~Real Life Publishing Company~...but resist the temptation. This place is toxic, and it will scar you, and then you'll be trapped because you're too afraid to quit a new job so soon. And then you'll be stuck there. Like everyone else.

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    Advice to Management

    There is nothing that could be said to management here that has not already been said more eloquently by dozens of employees dozens of times. Quit. Sell the company. You are cogs in a machine of evil.

    IGI Global2016-01-31
  7. Helpful (11)

    "Anonymous"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Editorial Assistant in Hershey, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IGI Global full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The people I worked with made coming into the office worthwhile. The office also had a convenient location on Chocolate Ave.

    Cons

    Expect to be treated unfairly. Expect to be underpaid. Expect to be unappreciated by CEO. Expect awful benefits and a couple days of PTO a year. Expect to have your arrival time at work monitored by cameras and to get in trouble if you're 2 minutes late because God forbid you get stuck in traffic. Know that any 4- or 5-star posts you see on here are posted by the CEO or one of the high-level managers. I took the... job for some experience after college and was completely turned off from the publishing industry. I worked hard while I was at this company despite its unrewarding structure. I left years ago but have communicated with former coworkers and friends, and it sounds like the place is getting worse every single day. The entire publishing process is a joke. The books are plagiarized and authors are acquired through spam. The CEO just wants to make money and has no integrity, which has earned this company zero respect in the publishing industry.

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    Advice to Management

    Start with treating your employees like they matter.

    IGI Global2015-12-22
  8. Helpful (4)

    "Unique place to work in Central PA"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at IGI Global full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    You aren't going to find many publishers in central PA. IGI Global allows you to work leading research projects while being where you want to live. There is a lot of opportunity with the publisher's international reach and the company is straight-forward about what they expect.

    Cons

    You will need to work hard. I would rather work hard and know what is expected at IGI Global, than play games with other employers.

    Advice to Management

    Keep providing opportunities for training, communication and collaboration.

    IGI Global2015-10-07
  9. Helpful (13)

    "Vampire Press"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at IGI Global full-time

    Pros

    Mostly friendly and hardworking co-workers.

    Cons

    This is a small company run by a CEO who is playing a very clever game with his business. The idea is: hire inexperienced workers, pay them well below national average salaries with meager benefits for technical jobs, and then produce publications for the lowest bidders in international academia. These employees are often given unreasonable expectations and expected to produce publications with often poorly... presented manuscripts and materials (lowest bidder material), but because the company seems like a foot in the door for these young people, they put up with it. It's a vicious cycle. It's like an abusive relationship, or a vampire, feeding on you but keeping you alive. The CEO presents himself as a hands-off leader who can one month reward employees with commendations and a loosened leash for their performance, and then the next drive quantities of people to quit, or even in some instances, go on a haphazard firing spree.

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    Advice to Management

    Pay your workers a respectable salary based on national industry standards, or set reasonable expectations for the kind of material you're willing to produce and sell.

    IGI Global2015-10-16
  10. Helpful (15)

    "Enough is Enough"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at IGI Global full-time

    Pros

    The singular pro to this horrible place is the people that they somehow deceive into working there. The staff is a collection of some of the most hard-working, thoughtful and fun people you will ever have the good fortune to meet. It's not unheard of for somebody that is leaving to feel guilty for leaving behind their former coworkers. Survivor's guilt, in a sense.

    Cons

    Where to start. Well, the upper management seems to think that a great alternative to having a good environment is to lie about it online. Every 5 star review on this site is by one of the owner's inner circle. Not only do they write knowingly misleading reviews, but they have concocted a strategy to attempt to game the system since the poor reviews on this site were leading to a lack of people applying. There... are so many reasons why this place is a terrible place to work, but the biggest two would come down to the owner and his sidekick. For a long time, it seemed like a lot of the bad was coming directly from the owner, who is rarely ever there. It has since become apparent that the biggest issue is the people he is surrounding himself with. Since he is rarely in the office (twice a week maybe), he only hears one side of the story from sycophants and charlatans. This has lead to a toxic environment that eats away at you the longer you are there. Talk to one of the employees that have been there longer than a few years and you'll see what I mean. This doesn't absolve the owner of blame. He is quick to anger, dismissive, arrogant, and, at the worst of times, completely uninformed at the running of his own company. He can have swings where he is nice to his employees, but the next day, he'll be back to screaming at people until they are in tears. A lot of the management are nightmares. They has way to much control over everything and one spends most of their time watching the cameras set up around the building making sure people arrive on time and are working a full 8 hours (spoiler alert, they are, but this person has called people out for being 1 minute late when there is flexible scheduling). The same person throws their weight around constantly and when they have been confronted about something, they runs to the owner. A lot has been made about the sexual harassment claim, as it should. Unfortunately, that wasn't the first, or last, time something like that has happened. Same person committing it, just different women. It's very sad and it appears that nothing will be done about it. Outside of the owner's inner circle having way too much control, the expectations fluctuate widely from month to month, week to week, and day to day. They will go from being widely unrealistic to insanely unrealistic on a daily basis based on the mood of the owner and certain members of management that is based on reports that nobody else can see or substantiate. When these unrealistic goals aren't met, people will usually be fired, or at the very least threatened with being fired. That happens very, very often. The whole turnover thing is actually a bit of a joke among the staff. There are several lists floating around naming who has all left and when. The amount of names on each list is staggering. You may be able to look at that as "this is a great starter job, look at all the people that have gotten elsewhere", but that's simply not the case. Of the ones who weren't fired, the others ran screaming from this place to anywhere that would hire them. Some took pay cuts, some got out of the industry entirely. That's what this place does to you. You either stay long enough to be defeated, or you leave and the well is poisoned for you. Everybody deals with this employment a different way. Some get so mad they walk out, never to be seen again. Some give up, going through the motions everyday. Some stop caring and spend most of their time looking desperately for something else. Everybody's different. But when you work at a place that you can compare with PTSD, something is wrong. Something is rotten at IGI Global, and I'm not sure it can be fixed.

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    Advice to Management

    Instead of wasting time making fake reviews on a job review site, use the site for what it was meant for. Read the negatives, and work on them. These people are your employees and want to work in a better environment. Just look at what happened when you gave everybody flexible scheduling and started treating them remotely like people. Production went up massively to the point of putting out record numbers. People... were happier and you didn't lose anybody for a few months. I'm not sure what happened to cause that backslide into bad, but it might not be too late.

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    IGI Global2015-10-08
Found 46 reviews