Intel Corporation Reviews in Arizona | Glassdoor

Intel Corporation Arizona Reviews

Updated July 18, 2017
772 reviews

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Intel Corporation CEO Brian M. Krzanich
Brian M. Krzanich
273 Ratings

772 Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (157)

    "Brutal employee ranking system"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Great compensation and benefits. In normal times there is visible and tangible reward for your effort and achievements. Excellent job mobility and flexibility for work and personal circumstances and a real team-oriented 'all in this together' attitude. Plus, there is an indescribable thrill to be working on the bleeding edge of the science, the technology, the process, etc. Intel remains a world-class technology innovator.

    The majority, a smaller majority than before (pre 2010 ish), of people there are very very skilled, capable and productive. They are easily able to overcome the statistically necessary under-performers while they have a bad year, or two. It all works out as the teams naturally form a mix of skills and attitudes which complement each other. Over the long-term these mixes are more productive than homogeneous groups of excelling performers.

    Famously, the sabbatical benefit is to die for. 8 weeks paid sabbatical, no strings, every 7 years, or 4 weeks every 4 years. Intelites count in 7-year increments. Plan it well, make use of it. DO NOT fritter it away on home improvements.

    Cons

    It all goes to hell in January & February. The Focal system encourages poor antisocial behaviors as employees compete for finite compensation crumbs which are distributed by a multi-tier rating and ranking system. All the objective behaviors of 10 months are tossed aside for subjective visibility-promoting activities in the critical 2 months with a healthy dose of lies and self-promotion. You are at the mercy of short term whims and transitory fads where the appearance of productivity outweighs the achievement of the whole 12 months. It is brutal. Sometimes you win; sometimes you lose. But nowadays losing carries a terminal prognosis.

    All the above is flavored by a new positive discrimination towards underrepresented minorities (URMs) which by executive decree have preference for promotion, transfers, and in some measure the ranking benefits. Non-URMs have an additional hurdle of proving their unique ability to fit a role; URMs can fit anywhere and do not cost a department headcount budget for a period of time. Net-net is that if you are not a URM then hiring, transfer, and benefit opportunities narrow quickly. Already there are pockets of URMs which almost exclusively hire each other and even speak their own language in meetings to exclude employees not of that background.

    Advice to Management

    The positive discrimination policy is hurting your business. It has the greatest of intentions, but the full-force implementation in most aspects of employee relations is crushing the opportunities for your non-URMs. To meet the national racial and URM/non-URM mixes in all of your businesses, programs, activities, and organizational slices in such a short timescale when the graduate mix is nowhere near the target mix it logically MUST place less skilled employees above those with greater skills. It only looks good in a spreadsheet presuming fungible resources; once the individuals and the contributions of individuals is accounted for it is painful.

    Most of the time 20% of employees do 80% of the work. (Which employees are which varies from project to project, and month to month, of course. You need a mix). Your policies of focal, positive discrimination, transfer freezes, and now ISP/VSP (the layoff mechanisms) are cutting deeply into the pool of the better employees at a low-pint in their natural contribution cycling. Individual first-line managers who have their own axes to grind are becoming judge and jury and in a world of introverts and extroverts the extrovert braggart is winning and doesn't even realize they are really losing.


  2. "Administrative Assistant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Administrative Assistant in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Administrative Assistant in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Intel Corporation full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Interesting environment, opportunity to advance, multitasking presented and interesting challenge

    Cons

    At times stressful and immediate turn around of work

    Advice to Management

    none

  3. Helpful (1)

    "Fantastic place to work with a great laid back culture, with great compensation."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Undergrad Technical Intern in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Undergrad Technical Intern in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Intel Corporation (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Culture Pay\ Work Locations Benefits Events Work from home Great management

    Cons

    The only thing I could possibly complain about is that I got an old laptop.

    Advice to Management

    Keep doing what you're doing!


  4. "Excellent environment to work within."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - R and D Engineering Support in Chandler, AZ
    Current Employee - R and D Engineering Support in Chandler, AZ

    I have been working at Intel Corporation full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Flexible schedule, relaxed atmosphere, great cafe great culture

    Cons

    Honestly can't think of one.


  5. "Manufacturing technician"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Manufacturing Technician in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Manufacturing Technician in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Intel Corporation full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Great pay with extra bonuses. Free drinks. Free gym. Good coworkers, Goodie drawer vouchers and compressed work week

    Cons

    Change managers almost every year is hard and depending on how good your new manager is depends on if you will get the training you want and need to move up. Stagnet employees keep up on the outs needed but fail at year end review time

    Advice to Management

    Work with employees and help them succeed.


  6. "Can be stressful at times"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior CAD Design Engineer in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Senior CAD Design Engineer in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Intel Corporation full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Good compensation when you factor in the benefits. Everyone works hard and time off is built into the culture.
    The maturity leave and a sabbatical every 7 years is a great way to stay connected with your family.

    Cons

    Lots of group churn. It can be hard to tell if your group will be dissolved or you will be moved around.


  7. Helpful (4)

    "Intel was a great company to work for - until my last year!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Engineering Manager in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Senior Engineering Manager in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Intel Corporation full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    I loved working for Intel 4 out the last 5 years of my tenure. I worked a total of 22 years for Intel and have a great deal of gratitude to the company and the people that mentored me.

    Cons

    5 years prior to my departure I challenged a "marginal review" I was given. The reason cited was that I wasn't proactive about pursuing added scope and responsibility after my return from sabattical. In fact before departing I went out of my way to identify a job upon my return, and cut short my planned 11 week family trip to 8 weeks to allow for a transition with another manager. I asked for an open door investigation, and HR changed the review to successful, but the senior HR person stated in writing there were "other" issues that my new manager would be advised of. I asked what the other issues were and the HR person said, "these investigations don't always come out clean" I asked again what issues I could address; the HRD declined to discuss further, and I asked to be copied on any communication to my new manager and he also declined to copy me.

    To exacerbate my frustration further I initiated, formed teams and developed scope and schedule for a project that yielded $46M in documented capital cost savings in that year. This made the notion of meritocracy ring hollow for me. My boss's boss said you need to understand something, "if you aren't political you ain't shixt in this organization." I said I recognized politics is a necessary process to get people aligned, but the measure should be to the degree that leaders align people to our values, and demonstrate them to others. It appeared that people who used the least common denominator of tactics rose in the organization. I was disheartened to see the person who originated the false claims rise two levels in 4 years.

     It wasn't until 3 years later when Intel was subpoened on a separate legal issue that I saw what was written in my personnel file and copied to my manager and his manager. It stated that I didn't account for a missing $930,000 on a project I managed prior to my sabattical, and asked, "where did the money go" . The person making the allegation was the project leader who replaced me for my sabattical. Before leaving I scheduled a budget review with he and his project engineers to go through the budget - they showed/ he didn't. I stopped him in the hallway and offered to go through the budget; he declined. Upon returning from sabattical I performed a month to month reconciliation of the budget (which he could have and should have performed himself) . 6 months later he still insinuated that I obsconded with or otherwise embezzled the $930,000. (Were it not for a lawsuit I would have never known that I was falsely accused of theft or embezzlement)

    For 21 years I loved working for Intel it's culture really resonated with my own values, and I witnessed others striving to perform to the principles which made Intel a Great Place to Work. It seems there's two cultures at work. The operations side and the HR side. When I would talk to HR people about the values and principles of the company they didn't seem to "get" them. I was passed from person to person in attempting to address the false accusations leveled by HR.

    Finally I was assigned a junior person without authority to act or any accountability. She was totally powerless to address my issues and knew none of the history, and she felt the HR person who originated the innuendo should have to answer my questions. She shared with me how her husband had left her and it didn't seem fair and said she knew this wasn't fair either. She was the one person in HR who came across as genuine and authentic. She laughed when I said, she was the last stop in the "HR shuffle" This tactic leaves people feeling they are dealing with a faceless stranger when their concerns get past through 4 different people, in my case.

    Frontline HR employees shouldn't be put in a position to clean up a mess they didn't create or are powerless to fix.

    In January of that year my boss declared in front of two HR people that my performance was good, and I didn't need to worry about my standing (with the company I had served 22 years.) In March we had a discussion and he drew a venn diagram showing his influence over my fate vs. HR's. He stated that I would be IR'd (despite being assured in January that my performance was good) . He stated higher ups in HR were forcing his hand. I told him that I simply wanted to clear my name and I had no intention of suing a company I served and who served me so well for 22 years. I chose to resign. To this day I want the best for Intel and still hold considerable stock in the company. i hope the advice detailed below will enable HR to live the values that make Intel great to this day.

    Advice to Management

    Be open and direct with employees. In the case above I was open to hearing any concerns and addressing them, but the accusations were hidden from me and I was never given the opportunity to clear my name.

    -Specific to the "Open Door" investigations the following process should be adhered to:

     The process should be documented and communicated at the outset of each investigation.

    The investigation scope should be identified.

    The issues to be resolved agreed to with with the employee

    Any new "findings" should be discussed with employee
    (In my case if this had happened I could have provided the reconciliation document that accounted for the $930,000 budget variance, and my reputation with my new management and subsequent other employers could have been preserved and restored)

    The final investigation needs to be copied to all parties involved especially the affected employee.

    Separate from the specific recommendations regarding, "Open Door" investigations I suggest the following.

    Adopt a review process that evaluates each employee's performance to Intel's Values.

    Create work plans that are reviewed and statused with employees twice quarterly. (So ee's can know in real time where they stand, and what their opportunities to improve are)

    Make performance management a process not an event at the end of the year.

    Make HR legal be a service organization that serves to support Intel's values rather than polarizing HR and employees.

    (In my case, HR was less than forthcoming and honest. The HR specialist was totally demoralized trying to defend the indefensible, and left shortly after I did. There was fallout that extended beyond my concerns. A good friend and neighbor had advised that I should move forward in attempting to clear my name and suggested that not taking action would be giving, "tacit acceptance to bad faith dealing" . He was removed from his senior HR staff position a week later, and my HR person told him his removal was unwarranted.)

    I hope HR will recognize that it's current practice with similarly situated employees (a few of which I know personally) makes them subject to litigation. I personally have no interest in engaging with lawyers. The open door process needs serious reforms, and I hope Intel will be proactive about adopting my recommendations. The legal jeopardy aside, restoring integrity with its employees will make Intel a far better place to work. I recognize and accept that Intel is constituted of flawed people like myself, but it can do much better for it's employees.

              -Integrity is the cornerstone to creating a workable environment-

    The two symbols in Chinese for crisis are - risk and opportunity. I hope Intel will chose to embrace the opportunity and mitigate the risk. To me this is the next strategic inflection point Intel needs to navigate through.

    I hope this advice is taken in the spirit intended - that is, to outline opportunities to make " Intel a Great Place to Work," again.

    I would welcome a conversation with someone empowered to affect the needed positive changes, and provide free consulting. I feel very indebted to Intel, and this would be my way to make a difference.

    Best Wishes.

  8. "Group Leader"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Group Leader in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Group Leader in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Intel Corporation full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Continuous learning environment, advancing opportunities, cutting edge technology.

    Cons

    Politics, exhausting work hours, somewhat impersonal environment.

    Advice to Management

    Adhere to IMBO.


  9. Helpful (3)

    "Product Marketing Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Product Marketing Manager in Chandler, AZ
    Current Employee - Senior Product Marketing Manager in Chandler, AZ
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Intel Corporation full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Very good additional benefits and work-life balance programs. Employee Stock Purchase Program lets you invest 5% of your pay in Intel stock at a 15% discount. Program to help pay for backup child care if your kids are sick and can't go to school. Intel contributes to your retirement / 401k account regardless of how much you contribute.

    Cons

    Strategy is constantly changing and the company cancels projects/products all the time. Intel needs to place big bets on a few up and coming technologies and they stick with it. So many product cancellations means they never get new products to market and will eventually get left behind by other technology companies.

    Advice to Management

    Stop investing 3/4 of what is required to be successful in a market only to cancel programs and throw away everything that you developed to date.


  10. "Program Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Program Manager in Phoenix, AZ
    Current Employee - Program Manager in Phoenix, AZ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Intel Corporation full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    There is many career challenge opportunity.

    Cons

    Company is too big and sometime it is little slow to make decision.


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