Intergraph PP&M Reviews in Huntsville, AL | Glassdoor

Intergraph PP&M Huntsville Reviews

Updated March 19, 2017
62 reviews

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Huntsville, AL Area

3.4
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Intergraph PP&M CEO Ola Rollén
Ola Rollén
29 Ratings

62 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Work/Life Balance is supported at Intergraph, including the option to work from home (in 14 reviews)

  • Great coworkers, International work environment (in 27 reviews)

Cons
  • Average benefits, no career growth opportunities, micro-managment (in 9 reviews)

  • Extremely unbalanced departments with no room for growth or advancement (in 5 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Intern Administration"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Intern - Hourly in Huntsville, AL
    Former Intern - Intern - Hourly in Huntsville, AL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Intergraph PP&M as an intern (More than a year)

    Pros

    New building was an exciting environment to be in. Things were definitely changing and it was for the better.

    Cons

    Some of the employees were not happy with their situation, mostly growing pains from the changes.

    Advice to Management

    Find a better place to "hide", the company favors transparency but it can be a bit too much when you see all the managers gather together unexpectedly.


  2. "Senior Software Developer"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Madison, AL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Madison, AL
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Intergraph PP&M full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Flexible Working time, good co-worker

    Cons

    No promotion road map in the long run


  3. "Good Company to work for"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Former Employee in Madison, AL
    Former Employee - Former Employee in Madison, AL
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Intergraph PP&M full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Common interests and current technologies still are true. Great employee relationships

    Cons

    Work environment. Open Seating and lots of white noise.

    Advice to Management

    Be upfront and direct with employees. Share future goals as a part of a team effort.


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  5. Helpful (2)

    "Intergraph"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Technical Manager in Huntsville, AL
    Current Employee - Senior Technical Manager in Huntsville, AL
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Intergraph PP&M full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Company is on the cutting edge of technology, customer focused, and offers technical challenges to employees.

    Cons

    Business is tied to Oil market.


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Great Experience"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Field Deployment - Network Engineer in Madison, AL
    Former Employee - Field Deployment - Network Engineer in Madison, AL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Intergraph PP&M full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    This was not with PPM but rather a side healthcare contract. The experience learned was amazing as you are thrust into every available project and are able to apply hands on with a variety of network experience. Huge pro was the level of professionalism you were able to assume when working with the customer side.

    Cons

    The internal management structure was completely broken. Not only was this a friend's club but also family members were hired and nepotism was rampant. Nothing like being evaluated against the managers son/daughter/2nd cousin. Management is located out of Toledo, OH and makes day to day operations a bit micro-managed as no one is on site to assist when you need the help. Turnover has been higher over the past 12 months as the pay for starting employees is $12-14/hr and expected to perform Project Management behaviors and the quality of work that colleagues on your team are being compensated muuuch higher. Physical training is weak and the fear of being released.fired is daily. Everyone is a contractor and promise a direct hire (which would include benefits) which never happens. Employees have been promised a 3 months hire date and still ongoing multiple years clinging onto the hope this happens. They have managers which are contractors because they will not hire directly, as they reserve the right to terminate your employment with a simple phone call (insert fear tactic referenced above).

    Advice to Management

    Place managers in Madison and separate the leadership from Toledo to Madison, AL. Also, recognize and compensate the employees for the level of work they are accomplishing. Lastly, stop hiring your own family.


  7. "Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Huntsville, AL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Huntsville, AL
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Intergraph PP&M full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Great coworkers, International work environment

    Cons

    Merit increases are not always given

    Advice to Management

    Share more of you vision with the employees


  8. Helpful (9)

    "Dungeon"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Analyst in Madison, AL
    Former Employee - Software Analyst in Madison, AL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Intergraph PP&M full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Fishing
    Good gym
    Ice cream and other food or beverages always available
    Newest building in the area
    Easily recognized industry leader in PP&M software
    An outstanding opportunity for working with confusing foreign people

    Cons

    Termperamental managers (Yelling, slamming desks, cursing, insulting, humiliating)

    Toxic people (Aggressive and overbearing) This company is what happens when you never fire people.

    Obstacles abound, personnel and mgmt, like a minefield. There's nothing like trudging through toxic sludge (people) to get a day's wage.

    Prison mentality (None are willing to leave without a fight. They fought to get where they are and won't back down. It's a rough crowd.) Blue Falcon Central - Lay-offs are so common that you have a target on your back from the minute that you walk in the door. It's a common saying here, "Don't let anyone chase you out of your job" because they will. The corporation should be congratulated for creating the most inhospitable work environment to strive in.

    Pushy attitudes - Peers are wolves in sheep's clothing. The competition is like Lord of the Flies. The King of the Hill approach to business is dog eat dog, where one's guard is never let down and nothing is to be said unless you're ready for scrutiny from every imaginable angle. Delete your social media account, because that's up for discrimination and it will be used for attack leverage.

    Tiny workspaces (You can pat each other on the back, it's like sharing a table) The new open office works great. 4 conversations happening within 10 feet of you are exactly what one needs when focusing on 10 tasks on their desktop at once. The layout is super when every passer-by gets the steel reinforced concrete bouncing like a trampoline so that your dual monitor arm makes your screens jump like their giggling.

    Noisy work environment (No walls are a constant distraction, headphones are a necessity)

    High work tempo (sprints are always a struggle, to the Postal extent) Your buddy will stab you in the back as soon as you turn around. Your manager will rush you into performing poor quality work because that's what their managers do to them.

    Lazy coworkers (napping and watching Netflix while you pull their weight)

    Your cell phone is out of range. It will not work here.

    When you apply for a position, your skills are marginalized. Unless your previous job title was exactly the same as the Intergraph job title, you're unqualified and none of your work was related to the position that you want. This way, Intergraph HR can offer you the lowest price that you never expected to be insulted with.

    Babe magnet? Not hardly

    Mens latrine has 2 toilets, so that you can feel what it's like to wait for 99 guys to share your throne. Develops plant planning, maintenance, and operations software; Wants 112 men to use 2 toilets, 11 women get 4. Every wing. Every floor.

    This environment is an alternate reality, one where intelligence is measured in stubbornness, laziness, and knowledge of proprietary product releases. Any other measures of expertise would be far off base and contributions would be discredited for their incoherence.

    It's okay when your monitor bounces because of the steel reinforced concrete floors until you sit across from someone that constantly bounces their foot up and down. Then, it's like riding a train or a horse while using your computer everyday.

    It isn't the new Open Office floor plan design layout that has the culture of Cannibalism rampant within Intergraph. This company is well known for lay-offs at any sign of a downward turn of profits. Every on'ry power hungry spy, nay-sayer, and hostile co-worker is out for themselves. If you can be tattled on, forced back where you came from, or sabotaged, then it allows them to be the last one standing. Many of the veterans that are here aren't willing to leave without a fight and they're ready to kick butt and take names every minute of every day they're forced to work alongside of you.

    There should be weekly support group meetings to deal with the drastic pay cut that happens when coming onboard this company.

    HR there adds insult to injury and isn't worth the breath.

    You had better have an interest in translator as a job specialty. Most of the customers for the PPM side are foreign. It is impossible to interpret what is being communicated 95% of the time. My manager was painful to follow. This is a mostly foreign employer. If you're a grammar nanny, this has the potential to become an unending annoyance or infinite pleasure, if you're into translation jobs. Help desk support jobs are tough even when assisting English speaking people. Support here is difficult to impossible.

    When your peers do no work, bad work, or don't come to work, rest assured that there will be no significant repercussions. If you're able to work for management that neglects their duty of removing obstacles, employees that watch Netflix with their feet on their desks, No-Show on a daily basis, or waste time everyday they arrive for duty, then this is an excellent opportunity. Pain, in the form of frustration, is your daily diet. Keep working hard, someone (or a half dozen of them) is actively disengaged and could care less about your efforts. But, they aren't going to get paid if you stop doing yours, and their, job.

    Advice to Management

    Grow up, take responsibility for lack of policy

    Work on the English language some

    Quit blaming others for your failure to lead

    Give up the arrogance because you really perform poorly at your job

    Those that work for you think you don't do anything

    Stand up for the strength of your company which is your developers and engineers

    It's demotivating to hear how competitor software brands are so much more awesome than what you and your team build

    The good lives that you're destroying were worth dignity and respect

    If a contract is in place to hire after a predetermined amount of time, honor the contract.

    When details are withheld and replaced with lies, it devalues your integrity as a person and a manager.

    If the company is only able to retain talent by leading them on, then eventually the web of lies comes undone.

    When the worst of employees is direct-hired and good talent is contracted, it proves that no value is gained in contracting employees.

    Mangers remove obstacles, this is not management. Obstacles are secured, at all costs. Toxic co-workers are dispersed into the workforce, fervently.

    The good managers, a couple there, don't need to change anything at all. Keep up the good fight, it isn't over yet.


  9. Helpful (3)

    "Mostly, and EXCELLENT COMPANY"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Tech Writer in Madison, AL
    Former Employee - Senior Tech Writer in Madison, AL
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Intergraph PP&M (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Very employee focused. Always thinking of ways to reward employees. Provided an employee lounge where staff could get away from work stress for a few and sit in comfortable lounge chairs to chat a bit with others, or watch TV, or play foosball or pingpong. Frequent company picnics, generous cash rewards, assistance with college costs, surprised all 5,000 plus employees from time to time with gifts of things like their own iPod. Only provided top quality ergonomic furniture, provided top quality computers and industry standard software, usually replacing existing employee computers every 6 months or so in order to ensure work could be performed up to current standards. Offered employees opportunities to cross train and learn skills in other departments when possible. On the corporate campus, the company had a full size employee spa / gym, where at least a couple times a week, after work hours, I would treat myself to an hour long massage. Not sure how benefits are now, but during my employee, monthly employee health care premiums consistently remained at $10.00 a month. The company would tell us, year by year, that due to the company's continuing successes, it would reward this who were responsible for the company;s success by continuing to provide very low cost health care coverage. Oh, and the copays, while I was still employed there, for doctor visits, drugs, etc. never went above $10 for drugs and $15 for doctor visits, or special procedures. So, if it seems as if the salaries were on the low side, keep in mind, that the other costs, like for health care premiums, etc. were beyond reasonable, and then there were those quarterly performance bonuses, and if you worked in the right area, and dealt with the sales force group, when the sales staff got additional $800/quarter sales bonuses, so did all of us working behind the sales team members to help insure their sales successes.

    I have only worked for two of the many large U.S.corporations in my employment history that I would rate with over the top reviews: One is Intergraph Corporation, and the other is General Mills, Inc. I'll be giving away my age here, but wanted to add that during my 10 years of employment at General Mills, Inc., I accrued retirement pension funds, that General Mills socked away for my future retirement time, and although due to marriage I had to leave General Mills after 10 years with that company when I married, I was able to retire early and can live off of the monthly General Mills, Inc., pension checks I now receive monthly, and will for the remainder of my life. But companies like Intergraph and General Mills, Inc., are almost dinosaurs in this age where employees are no longer valued, instead, pleasing the shareholders by giving what the employees have done to be able to provide for the shareholders of the company aren't given much consideration. In most modern corporations, it now seems employees are mere cogs in a wheel, and if an employee doesn't like the corporate style of nothing for you, all for me and the shareholders I please so I can keep my job, I'm surprised that even so, and even as wages are not much more now than they were in the late '70's before that horrid and intended to remain meant only for corporate boardroom eyes, as it was distributed to the American corporate world in the early '70's, known as the Powell Memorandum or Powell Manifesto, a corporate lawyer who sat on 11 different corporate boards, showed corporate America that it needs to divert the People's government away from serving the people and instead serve the corporate world, and a good way to do that, bit by bit, so as not to seem overtly taking away the People's government would be best done by way of corporate access to sums of money to provide politicians in their effort to assist corporations in passing laws beneficial to corporations, but not the People, and definitely not the nation, its economy, or its environment. The Powell Memorandum, or as I prefer, the Powell Manifesto, is still available in full PDF text form on the Internet. Occasionally, I will go back and re-read that corporate manifesto, and every time I do, I take note of how more and more of Powell's suggestions to allow corporate America to run the People's government to corporations' benefit have, decade by decade, more and more come to pass. I certainly hope both Intergraph and General Mills, Inc. hold to their corporate culture of realizing that it is their employees who will make a company successful far and away more than will any effort for corporations to take away more and more from its employees to give to its shareholders. So sad. Prior to the 1980's, when Powell's suggestions begin being implemented, you may note, America had enjoyed a multi-decade economic boom, with a healthy and large Middle Class, corporations becoming wealthier too, and we were the envy of the world. It was during those decades that "Reaching The American Dream" was coined, for at that time, it was possible. It no longer is, is it? Not with wages being approximately what they were 20 years ago. I was looking back to the year 1980, when I was earning $5.00/hr. I was renting a 3 bedroom, brick home with full kitchen and wood burning fireplace, and my monthly rent was $160. Compare that with the minimum wage of today, being only $2.25/hr more than what I earned 35 years ago, and for even a 1 bedroom apartment rental, it's going to cost someone at least $400/month. So I wondered: In 1980, my rental cost worked out to be 17% of my gross income. of $5/hr for housing Today, a mere 1 bedroom apartment for someone earning $7.25/hr gross, comes out to be 33% of their income for housing. So don't tell me America isn't in an ever deeper, faster downward spiral. What's it going to take, another worker uprising as in the early decades of the 20th century to return economic fairness to ALL Americans. No, not all Americans want more, more, more, for nothing. In fact, with America's top income earners NOT having to work for their income, and demanding more, more, more, for doing nothing, I believe what's needed is their having an honest look in the mirror as to who the true "people who want free stuff" REALLY are!

    Cons

    I can think of very little to say against working at Intergraph, save for one traumatic experience that eventually ended the Intergraph job I loved quite suddenly. I was tasked to create contractual documents for Intergraph clients and prospective client review. Due to the nature of Intergraph's business interests, often our very intelligent Intergraph India employees would come to America after creating new engineering designs using mathematical equations to support their design applications, if the potential client could understand the top engineer's calculated theory, including detailed written explanation to help clarify how and why their proposal would be an efficient, economic, and technological advanced solution for the potential client. Understandably, attempting to understand the engineering design concept the Intergraph India engineering genius had created called for my attempting to make "Indian" English sound more like "American" English in how it flowed when read. I cannot recall a time when I had a single difficulty working with these PhD engineering geniuses, despite a bit of a language barrier. When I had finished a given project, the Indian Intergraph PhD genius engineer never failed to come back and thank me for being able to translate his mathematical chicken scratches and broken English attempts into contractual document offerings that a potential customer would feel confident made sense to them. I was also responsible for implementing a corporate wide information management database that no one else in Intergraph had so far attempted to design. My then manager was impressed enough to take me around Intergraph and show various departmental groups what this new system could do for them.

    But, for some still unknown reason, this very same manager, on one fated afternoon, called a team meeting behind closed doors in his office. These were typically weekly occurrences, and so what was to come my way was like a bold from the blue. After a few greetings all around among us all, this manager, who had never said one ill word to be ever before, had always given me favorable reviews, suddenly without warning, and in front of my coworkers laid into me about how I was simply mediocre in my work output. He even cited how my work with the Intergraph India engineers I did English translation for, were unable to express their needs in ways I could understand. II wanted to say "Are you sure about that?" They always came back to thank me for helping to make their complicated engineering designs understandable to their potential clients, adding that the clients were clearly able to easily grasp the engineer's design theory and why it would be both do-able and effective. I wondered whether there was some Indian custom where Indian corporate culture meant one never speaks ill of other employees or something, but I could find nothing to back that up. But my manager wasn't done, once he had gained personal confidence with a highly effective startling response evident in me, even as I said nothing. His criticisms continued until he had gone so far as to complain about how I never had enough work pens on hand at any given time in my desk, how while he'd never said so in the three past years, he could not stand the "smell" of the candles I would burn from time to time in my office, and either I came to ask him too many questions about things I should already know, or I didn't come to ask him enough questions about things I didn't know.

    I couldn't win for losing in that hour and a half meeting as my poor coworker had to sit there looking at her lap while all of this manager's ire was heaped solely on me. My coworker and I left that meeting, and almost immediately out of range of the manager she said "WHAT was all that about?" She could no more believe what had just transpired that she'd been made captive to sit through than I did. Returning to my office after that meeting, I was terribly shook up, to the point of feeling a bit traumatized for having had such a wicked dressing down in front of my colleagues, and to both my colleague and I, seemingly without merit...as far as either of us could figure,.

    I immediately called Intergraph's HR department to explain, in tears, what had just occurred, and how I really did need some time away from work to recover from this verbal harassing by a supervisor, something HR, if not the manager as well, knew was illegal for a superior to do to a subordinate, particularly in front of other employees...and to go on for a full hour and a half with this seemingly unwarranted tirade pointed solely at me.

    The HR department told me to consider myself on paid company disability, to leave for home immediately, and take a few months to seek therapy and restore my senses, once I had described the details of that occurrence. Before leaving my office that day, I also placed a call to the state EEOE agency, and filed a complaint with that agency as well. When I was asked if anyone else present during this event would support my statements, I stated they would. Then I left the office without saying goodbye to the manager, and couldn't even bear looking in the rear view mirrors of my car as I pulled away.

    After a couple of months of rest, during which time much of my "therapy" consisted of planting new bushes and flowers in my yard, which gave me a sense of accomplishment I was badly lacking after that verbally abusive encounter on the job, I began to wonder whether returning to my job at all would be a good idea. No doubt, I reasoned, considering the volume of the manager's voice as he so harshly berated me did emirate out of his office and likely into the opened office doors of employees in nearby collocated departments. Since those employees could not hear me, only the supervisor, it is easy to surmise that, especially as the supervisor held higher rank than I did, that the office gossip would be all over the place when I did return. Could I deal with that? What if I asked for a transfer, but due to the spread of gossip, any other manager would be hesitant to take a chance on me. In the end, with much regret and sorrow, I decided I would need to end my employment with that beloved employer, all because of one unfortunate, but likely sensational occurrence that could affect my reputation with Intergraph ever after. I knew I could not work for that manager again, and I did not know if any other manager would have me. Best to begin a new job search outside my company. I did, and quickly secured a position that even paid $10,000 more a year, but it was nothing like working at Intergraph,.

    At the same time, I heard again from the EEOE agency, who had arranged an arbitration meeting between she and I, and Intergraph top management. At that meeting, I was asked to describe all that occurred, and honestly (sometimes embarrassingly tearfully), I explained how traumatic to me at least, such an unexpected high intensity tirade had come from my manager to me, with charges against me that neither I, nor my colleague could make sense of. Those present mentioned having spoken with my colleague to that effect. Then the group retired, and I waited for word from the EEOE 'referee" as to what might come of this. She returned to tell me Intergraph was offering me a large compensation sum, as long as I would not say anything more about this to anyone else.

    I understood Intergraph needed to keep the otherwise excellent employee relations reputation it had long held, so I agreed, and was thankful for the top management's consideration of the harm just one bad encounter had caused me - particularly my need to feel I could not continue my employment with Intergraph.

    So Cons? VERY FEW...unless you are unlucky enough to experience what I had experienced. Frankly, I do not see that, at least at the time of my employment there, as being very likely at all. But in case this manager may still be afoot in Intergraph Corporation, now you know, should you encounter the same, how I ended up working it out. I'm not totally satisfied, as I would rather have been able to keep my job, or some job at that then wonderful, employee focused company, but the chance gossip about that loud, rude, and downright illegal character assassination I suffered through, I just couldn't take having another manager reject me based only on words erringly spread around the company. And that is a hurt that will remain lifelong with me.

    Advice to Management

    For 99% of the time, I have never encountered more caring, considerate, employee focused management who have endeavored to create an employee-focused environment that fosters excellence in employees. In my experience as an employee there overall, I NEVER encountered any other employee exhibiting low moral. I guess I was just facing the wrong manager during a time when he lost his sensibilities and made me a scapegoat for whatever his real frustrations were actually about. Unfortunately, I was still the one to be wrongly crucified in my opinion and in the opinion of my direct coworker who witnessed the whole crucifixion of that manager nailing me to the mall over things I wouldn't even have even been able to have done. But what is a subordinate to do? Become angry and argumentative in return, only to escalate the bad situation and perhaps cause the manage to move to berating my coworker when I dared to speak up against his accusations against me? I suppose my coworker could have come to my defense, but I really wouldn't have wanted her to do that, only to have this out of control manager set his sites on her too. So we endured his hour and a half full force histrionics and when it was done, we could discuss privately what in the world had gotten into the man.]

    I do hope that after Intergraph's representatives met with me and the EEOE person at our subsequent arbitration meeting, thereafter, they addressed this issue with the manager and took steps to prevent this kind of thing from ever again occurring. Whether that meant putting the manager on an extended leaving and making his seeking counseling a mandatory condition of his continued employment, or perhaps relieved him of his management position, or perhaps his employment altogether with Intergraph...I don't know what this manager's past work history was, in order to decide which course of action needed to be taken. But my advice is that management certainly needed to undertake some sort of lastingly effective action against the results of this kind of thing, for had I wanted to, I easily could have filed a full law suit against Intergraph for that manager's illegal actions against me.

    Again, because I had always thought so highly of Intergraph as a company, I simply did not want to punish the entire company for the actions of one rogue manager. But I do certainly hope, although I'll never know and I will never ask, that Intergraph management didn't simply brush this issue, given the possible ramifications the entire company might have faced, if not then, then later, should this manager engage in similar illegal behavior against another employee and they choose to go totally public over it, unlike me.

    Please, please, do take some action when any employee of any rank makes the kind of histrionic display of loud, angry criticism of another employee in the presence of still other employees. HR law states this kind of behavior is indeed illegal. Please don't ignore the possible signs that an employee who did once reach the rank of manager hasn't possibly had an emotional break of some sort that could have a very bad outcome on Intergraph's future overall. Thanks


  10. Helpful (6)

    "Worst 4 years of my life."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - QA Analyst in Huntsville, AL
    Former Employee - QA Analyst in Huntsville, AL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Intergraph PP&M full-time

    Pros

    Most people were very nice.
    Amazing facility in Madison.
    I had some good experiences with some members of my group.
    Pay is average

    Cons

    Terrible management
    Managers promote people who sleep or just skip work (playing favorites)
    Drama-filled place
    No room to grow
    No guidance
    Mid-managers do not know the products
    Mid-managers treat employees like objects and will not care to yell and scream at personnel
    Employees have been seen sleeping and watching movies while others are doing the work
    HR does not help in any situation
    Employees who have been kicked off projects are being promoted by mid-managers to lead projects
    Some employees are allowed to work in the entire facility while others are made to stay at their desk and are not even allowed to go to go to quiet place to get work done.
    Mid-management will lie to get their way, show zero leadership skills, and do not care about you.
    Meetings have almost turned into physical confrontations (slammed desk, screaming, pitching fits)
    Your work is never safe, employees will/have sabotage other employees work to make them look bad. You can have proof, it will not matter.
    Environment is like a middle school playground
    Mid-managers hire their friends and will promote them regardless of if they make contributions to the company or not.

    Advice to Management

    They know this is happening but will not do anything about it. Continue to ignore it and it will go away type attitude.


  11. Helpful (1)

    "Software Scientist"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Madison, AL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Madison, AL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at Intergraph PP&M full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Good management. Good work and life balance.

    Cons

    The pay is not very good. The issuance is bad. No bonus.

    Advice to Management

    Let the developers more involved in the design.



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