J.B. Hunt Reviews | Glassdoor

J.B. Hunt Reviews

Updated May 26, 2017
762 reviews

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Full-time Part-time

762 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Engineering department has a great community, good work-life balance, interesting projects (in 22 reviews)

  • Great people working for the company (in 30 reviews)

Cons
  • work life balance leaves room for improvement (in 64 reviews)

  • They have you work long hours, and drive in savory places to begin (in 71 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Mediocre pay, expensive health benefits, upper management never keeps their word."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Manager
    Former Employee - Account Manager
    Recommends

    I worked at J.B. Hunt full-time

    Pros

    Promote from within (supposedly), room for advancement with the company (they claim), challenging work environment

    Cons

    Having your workload double and triple with the promise that it's a chance to prove yourself for a promotion, but they won't actually give you the promotion or the raise. Some managers went to other locations to "cover" empty positions "temporarily", but instead were kept separate from their families for years at a time. J.B. Hunt rarely keeps its word.

    Advice to Management

    If you promise a promotion or a raise or anything else, follow through. Don't try to see how long you can get the person to do extra work for no extra money, until they're ready to quit. You're losing high quality employees to save a buck.


  2. Helpful (6)

    "A Hot Mess"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Programmer in Lowell, AR
    Current Employee - Programmer in Lowell, AR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at J.B. Hunt full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    It's not Walmart
    Fortune 500 company

    Cons

    Incompetent management
    Promotion/hiring by connections, not merit
    They seem to take every opportunity they can to make sure you feel undervalued

    Advice to Management

    Wake up


  3. "will Lie to your face."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Truck Driver in Louisville, KY
    Current Employee - Truck Driver in Louisville, KY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at J.B. Hunt full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    There are no pros at this company

    Cons

    You will never get what they say they will offer you.

    Advice to Management

    Fire all your management and start over.


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  5. Helpful (1)

    "New Driver"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Driver Trainee in Windsor, CT
    Current Employee - Driver Trainee in Windsor, CT
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at J.B. Hunt full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I like the way they care about the driver. Many opportunities at this company.

    Cons

    They have you work long hours, and drive in savory places to begin.

    Advice to Management

    Be more specific on job expectations.


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Poor Upper Management"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at J.B. Hunt full-time

    Pros

    Good early career experience with management and logistics

    Cons

    Micromanaged, poor bonus structure dependent on a good contract at your location more than actual abilities, depending on location very very poor work/life balance

    Advice to Management

    Change bonus structure


  7. "Account Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at J.B. Hunt full-time

    Pros

    Flexible with great training to succeed

    Cons

    Doesn't pay well and too many people not enough promotions.

    Advice to Management

    Management is great with their teams


  8. Helpful (1)

    "Safety Coordinator, Driver Trainer"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Student in Bountiful, UT
    Former Employee - Student in Bountiful, UT
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at J.B. Hunt full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good solid company to grow and learn if you are wiling to put in the time and the effort. Make no mistake about any company you work for, long hours and dedication equals long hours away from family time and dedicated events. With that said, JB Hunt will give you a solid career and the tools to perform them with.

    Cons

    Late nights, away from home, or both are not uncommon at JB Hunt.

    Advice to Management

    None. JB Hunt is growing market. If you want to be in the transportation industry and have safe equipment with safe policies in place then JB Hunt should be one of your considerations.
    You may not enjoy trucks that drive 65 mph.


  9. Helpful (3)

    ""Account Manager""

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at J.B. Hunt full-time

    Pros

    Ability to develop and/or polish skills with Profit & Loss statements, employee management, time management, customer service, Microsoft Excel, route engineering, and schedule flexibility (IF you have a good supervisor).

    Advancement Opportunity: there is solid room for growth within the organization if you are flexible.

    Industry stability: the transportation industry is one that will not be going away any time soon. There is always a need for goods to be transported and JB Hunt is one of the top 3 transportation providers in the United States.

    Free salary x $1 life insurance for all office staff and the company does a fairly decent job of mitigating insurance premium costs.

    The salary for management positions below Account Manager is quite reasonable, especially if you have a good Account Manager and the account bonuses.

    Cons

    Work-Life balance: This company expects you to be on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. More often than not, you will be receiving calls at all hours of the day. A typical day is being at your account between 0800-0900 Monday through Friday and working until 1700-1800 without a lunch during the day. The only time that a lunch is guaranteed is when someone above you visits and takes you out. Any other time, they could not care less if you eat or get any time to yourself after what is more than likely a very stressful morning and senior management is all out eating Mexican or something on the company's funding. You will hopefully get home at a reasonable hour, and just when you think you are free to involve yourself in your personal affairs you will get a call from a driver, employee, customer, or manager needing assistance or demanding that you do something extra. With luck, it’s a quick turn-around but more often than not, that leads to additional hours in front of a laptop. After that, there’s always the chance that you will get a phone call while sleeping. It’s been proven that sleep interruption is one of the absolute worst things for your overall health and unless you have a really good manager, they could not care less and expect you to answer the phone – even if it’s a lonely driver that just needs someone to talk to because they are bored, don’t have a girlfriend or boyfriend, and sitting somewhere waiting on a load.

    This is because upper management, client services, and the pricing/design team refuse to allocate the correct number of managers on any given account, particularly those that run all hours of the day. It’s all about cost-reduction, even if that means they vastly reduce your quality of life by attempting to not allow you to have one.

    Vacation: The company recently migrated to a PTO system from the vacation system, which on paper gives everyone additional vacation time and flexibility with it. However, you never truly get time off. The problem is that if you do actually go somewhere, you will get either your boss (who most likely doesn’t know how to run the account) or the worst manager available to run your account. When you get back from vacation, you will have twice the work to do (if you haven’t already had to log on and work during your vacation time, which is usually the case).

    Upper Management: this is where things can really get rough. If you get a good manager that places their trust in you to run what is described as “your own business”, your life can be okay. You can get your job done at your pace and then attempt to tend to your personal business in between phone calls and emails as you can. However, some upper managers believe in “butt in seat” time and couldn’t care less about how productive you are, so long as your sit there for 10 hours and suffer as they either used to or perceive that you should. It’s really luck of the draw. Your immediate manager can either be your partner/leader, or the person that makes you want to hit up indeed.com and throw your phone every time you see their name pop up.

    I have seen and heard many cases where people are threatened with documentation on morning conference calls, over the phone, or in person. I’ve heard threats that if you document a driver and your language is not exactly what they want it to be, you will be documented and asked to re-do it. I’ve heard threats towards management if a driver isn’t wearing ice cleats in the winter time (like we are supposed to put them on their shoes for them). It goes on and on.

    Pay/Salary: Managers in general start in the $50-$52k area and move up. This is a good salary for positions below Account Manager, especially with a bonus involved. However, at the Account Manager level, the pay package is horrible. You will make roughly 10-15% more than the other managers below you, and work far more hours with much greater liability. Every time there is an issue, it’s always the Account Manager’s fault (even though most of the time it’s because someone else did something stupid or was lazy).

    The bonus structure is completely dependent on the performance of the account itself. If you are stuck with a bad rate contract with the customer or upper management simply decided to set the budget too high intentionally to avoid big bonus payouts, then you are out of luck. The worst thing is that if one of the drivers decides to have a collision that costs over $100k, you are automatically disqualified from bonus for that calendar year. Even if it’s not over $100k, it’s horrible to know that other people are directly in control of your bonus. Drivers can hit things or hurt themselves, which more-often-than-not will ruin your overall bonus. Upper management and the Safety department will simply say it’s your fault for not “changing the mindset” or “training” the drivers, even though you’ve never driven a truck.

    Lastly about pay, it’s not the best feeling in the world to know that while you are completely stressed out and have no life whatsoever, answering to dozens of different people a day, your drivers are out there making 10-20% on average MORE than you are. When have you ever worked somewhere where your boss made less than you do (except maybe in the case of exceptional sales people)?

    Appearances: the company is all about appearances. The best way to get ahead is not to make a lot of money for the company, but to “play the game”. What that means is that no matter how rude someone is to you, always respond with a smile and a “Thank You”. It means understanding that everyone is going to talk behind your back, including your boss and HR, but you still talk to your boss like they are your friend and be a “yes man”. You will have Safety, Operations, and the customer all yelling at you at the same time and you take it and go along with the flow. It’s a demeaning existence, and it’s no wonder the company has such a difficult time retaining quality managers. It’s a very “young” company, and management tends to hire directly from college and then leave within a year or two when they can’t take it anymore.

    Speaking of Safety, everyone in the company says that Safety is #1. The company bases everything around that. If you ask anyone, they will tell you it’s the first-priority and the company intentions are solely to improve the lives of everyone on the road. What they will only tell you in a dark room without any recording devices is that the whole goal is how to avoid a lawsuit. Safety expects you to magically drop whatever you are doing on a dime and be at their beckon call to “manage the event” when a driver does something stupid, including and up to driving out in the middle of the night to meet a driver who hit something and leaving your work behind to be done later while everyone other than Safety yells at you about why it’s not done.

    Also, drivers and management are normally given all kinds of training and documents to sign. The stated intention is to “train” people on how to be better drivers and in management’s case – how to train a driver to drive…. it’s ridiculous. It’s all about placing the blame on low to mid-level management.

    Drivers: truck drivers can be very difficult to deal with. I’m not going to stereotype and say that all truck drivers lack intelligence or common sense – because not all of them do. The company has lots of quality people driving trucks (some that are probably better suited for management than management themselves). However, most drivers cannot tie their shoe or use the restroom without calling you for direction. You can tell a driver a dozen times how you want things done, and either they are not going to do it or cannot listen long enough to process the information. Most of the time they are concerned with two things: how much their check is and how much home time they get. Drivers can also be very petty – they know how in-demand their CDL is, and they will take every advantage of it they can. Providing truck drivers remain in demand, they can say and do whatever they want and upper management will not let you fire them. I’ve seen a driver make some of the worst decisions I’ve ever seen a human being make and come right back to work a day or two later. They also have free reign to call your boss and complain on you, and 95% of the time you will receive an immediate phone call asking why you made a driver mad – even though they are your direct reports. Upper management will always take the driver’s side of things and never back you up. You never get to truly manage your people - your boss is always one simple phone call away from them, which allows them to take something they are whining about and turn it into a bash fest on you.

    Client Services: If you are given a Client Services account, it may be best to cut your losses and start looking for other positions internally. Client Services is a fancy word for “customer service”. These are people that work with customers that have multiple sites across the US. They are judged on their ability to please and retain customers, and in doing so will do everything in their power to make themselves look good, including but not limited to: cutting costs, intervening in operations (which is your job to manage), managing the contract, and going over your head to your supervisor to get their way. And most of the time, they will do anything they can to make you look bad enough to make themselves look like they fixed a problem, but not bad enough to get you fired (because then they might have to do something while another manager is transitioned in!).

    Advice to Management

    Read this review, and if you don’t see how bad of a job low to mid-level operations can be for some, you are blind.

    Stop rewarding people who kiss up to you and start rewarding the hard-working, productive, and profitable people who work for you, because there are quite a few.

    Stop telling everyone that HR is there to support you when they are just a liaison between management and upper management who always side with upper management.

    Stop wasting your time and money on mid-year reviews and annual meetings that no one cares about. The driver ceremony is important, but the rest is a dog and pony show, an excuse to expense alcohol, and a waste of a weekend.


  10. Helpful (7)

    "Unfair, depressing, hostile"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Representative in Lowell, AR
    Former Employee - Account Representative in Lowell, AR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at J.B. Hunt full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    If you're young this is a great starter job with many entry level positions to choose from, and it's a social environment so it's easy to make many friends.

    Cons

    I had worked here the majority of the years since 1998. This place has ruined me to ever want to be an employee again. Major favoritism happens. If you are good at your job, you don't get promoted (especially true in operations) because you are too valuable to let go. The employees most valued are the ones who, especially men, get out of their chairs, mill around the building and socialize and BS and basically do less work overall. This is a requirement to get recognition. Not a good environment for the "productive introvert".

    Any of the upper management that had been there since the 1980's got away with anything they wanted. When I was an ASM, I had 2 managers that were men who were known to go around massaging the shoulders of females and poked fun as they wished. HR did not care. It was like they tenure and did whatever the hell they wanted. One of them ACTUALLY RUBBED A HARD ON on me!! Discreetly, but it was there. There was a 3 year period that I left and came back only because I was desperate to pay off some debt and the manager who hired me acted like he owned me and never let me hear the end of my mistakes from my previous time. I was a night Walmart AR for 5 years and held the duties of a Sr AR but without the pay or title. After I left, the overnight AR who was a man, was given my old job and made a Sr AR. I still have a relative working there so I know for sure there is still sexism and favoritism happening.

    The bonus plans are now a joke. Probably to pay for their new construction going up to hire more fresh college students making $30k.

    Advice to Management

    Make the work environment less hostile. Reward and promote your quieter employees who like to get things done. Be aware of sexism and favoritism. Don't form a clique with subordinates. Treat them equally even if you don't necessarily like them all equally. They are your employees. Spend more time supporting your employees rather than listening only to customer demands.


  11. Helpful (2)

    "Account Manager"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Manager
    Former Employee - Account Manager
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at J.B. Hunt full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Out of college, this is a good first job. You learn a lot quickly and gain some valuable experience. Pay is mediocre for a first job.

    Cons

    The company makes deals with customers that are not profitable, nor will ever have any chance at being profitable. Your bonus structure is dependent on exceeding a budget that is made up out of thin air. Some accounts bonus handsomely, while others are doomed not to see a cent.

    The work life balance starts out mediocre and then quickly disintegrates to 80 hour work weeks. When running a start up account, this is especially true.

    The management in place tends to favor certain people that they like, without using performance or tenure as a basis for promotions. The company often chooses a person for a position, before opening it internally. The company will perform "interviews" for these vacancies because they have to, but at the end of the day, they are wasting everyone's time. Their decision was made before anyone even had a chance to apply.

    I truly enjoyed my first 2 years of employment with JB Hunt, but as I was expected to work 80 hour days began and continued for over a year and a half, with no possibility of receiving a bonus, I decided that it was time to look elsewhere.

    The company recently implemented a new and improved time off plan that on paper, provides employees with additional vacation time. The irony is that if you are in operations, you never truly take vacation. If you opt to use some time, they send you someone to cover you that is not at all experienced enough to handle your operation. They give you 1-2 days to train them and then expect everything to be good to go. You can either choose to answer their every phone call while on vacation to ensure your operation runs properly, or you can ignore them and let them fend for themselves. If you choose to ignore them, you will be stuck with the backlash from you drivers, customer, and operation when you return. I only took one true vacation in my 4.5 year career and while I was gone / unplugged, the operation experienced a nuclear meltdown, which I had to face when I returned. Don't expect to actually take a vacation if you work here.

    I inquired twice about different internal moves that I could take, but I was told that they didn't have anyone that could backfill my position. I wasn't even allowed to interview for these roles, even though I was more than qualified.

    On top of that, management bends over backwards to even the most ridiculous requests from customers and are scared to stand up to them. I endured profane rants from my customer multiple times a day and brought this to the attention to my superiors on multiple occasions. Little was done.

    One of my colleagues that I worked closely with was also subject to these extreme conditions and tried to make an internal lateral transfer to get out of them. He was met with a profane rant from his manager, and talked to in such a way by his manager's superior that conveyed to him that he was nothing and that they owned him.

    Due to the extreme hours, ridiculous expectations of the customer, complete lack of care for non driving employees, and hostile work environment, I had no choice but to leave the company.

    Don't make the mistake of working for this company. If you already did, get some experience quickly and jump ship.

    Advice to Management

    Hire additional managers to cover vacations so that your employees can actually get a break.

    Pay your employees more, after all you expect them to work 80 hour weeks.

    Treat your employees better and don't interrogate them if they ask to move positions or leave altogether. Rather, approach with compassion and try to find out how you can improve their conditions.

    Be more transparent and equal with hiring / promotion decisions.

    Stand up to your customers

    Adjust your bonus structure so that those running startups can actually get a bonus for working the ridiculous hours that they do.


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