LaSalle Network Reviews | Glassdoor

LaSalle Network Reviews

Updated April 9, 2019
231 reviews

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3.3
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LaSalle Network President & CEO Tom Gimbel
Tom Gimbel
168 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • "and you are compensated for your hard work with additive bonuses at the end of each quarter" (in 25 reviews)

  • "Our company culture and our team based approach to recruiting is what separates us from other recruiting firms" (in 17 reviews)

Cons
  • "Combine that with the tight PTO plan and people's work life balance often suffers" (in 20 reviews)

  • "Be prepared to work long hours and work hard" (in 25 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (3)

    "Best Place to Work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at LaSalle Network full-time

    Pros

    The best part of working at LaSalle Network is the culture we have. Everyone is very supportive of one another and we all truly care about each other. The culture and the people at LaSalle have helped me grow personally and professionally in just the year and a half that I have been here and I am so thankful for that.

    ELT and Management care about their employees. They devot so much time to training and development, not only because its their job, but because they care. They challenge, push, and empower us every day because of the potential they see in us.

    When someone is struggling management does not give up on them. They identify the strengths of that person and put them in a job that is better aligned with those strengths. If you work hard, have a good attitude, and prove you will do what it takes to be successful, you will be successful!

    I love working at LaSalle!

    Cons

    I do not have any cons.

    LaSalle Network Response

    Feb 12, 2019 – President & CEO

    Thanks for the feedback! Glad you found a home here :)


  2. "Nice"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Technical Recruiter
    Current Employee - Technical Recruiter

    I have been working at LaSalle Network full-time

    Pros

    Good Company nice people to work with

    Cons

    None that I can think of

  3. Helpful (14)

    "Toxic Culture with No Work/Life Balance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at LaSalle Network full-time

    Pros

    I think the company's mission is true and overall, the company attempts to do good work. I saw the positive changes LaSalle was making to the lives of some of their "field employees" (temps).

    There is also some good camaraderie amongst the non-management & non-sales employees (typically formed around conversations about the cons below, though).

    Cons

    tl;dr:
    - Management
    - Hours
    - Compensation
    - Culture

    Let's start with upper management. They are a tight-knit group of folks who only care about themselves and appeasing their leader. They are fine with forcing 50-60 hour work-weeks and they micro-manage every second you are there. The C-level execs are terrible. They boast how transparent and present they are, but they are so far disconnected from the actual employees that they have no idea what the company culture is truly like. Hate to be the one that breaks the news, but most non-management employees are not happy. Tom - when you talk about the negative Glassdoor reviews every second you get a chance to, most of the people in front of you are biting a hole through their cheek trying not to roll their eyes. Most of management will disagree with that statement, but that's because most of management has never worked for anyone else and thinks this company culture is normal. It isn't. It's not normal to have a CEO who has regular breakdowns and screaming fits in front of the entire company. Escape to any other company and you will see that this is just not normal.

    Hours are atrocious. You are expected to work at least 50 hours a week since your manager does, and God forbid if you want to use your incredibly lacking PTO benefits. Your managers will challenge the request, ask you WHY you are going to the doctor (illegal), and if you try to leave 10-15 minutes early, they will ask when you plan on making up the time... Even though you work 10 hours of overtime and never take a lunch break... They expect you NOT to use the 10 vacation days you are granted. Why offer a benefit if employees are expected to not use it? That is ridiculous. If you challenge the hours you work, your managers will point out that they work the same hours. That doesn't make you a harder worker, managers -- it shows us that you have no life outside of LaSalle Network.

    They will claim that the 10 vacation, 5 sick PTO benefit is "industry standard," but keep in mind that a 40 hour work-week is also industry standard... If you expect employees to put in above-average hours, you should offer above-average benefits.

    Speaking of benefits - a "ReBirthday" is not a benefit. It's a perk. For a company that preaches the difference between the two, you sure do fall short on execution.

    Compensation is incredibly lacking. After taking the job, I started comparing my salary to similar roles in similar companies and realized how grossly underpaid I was, especially given the hours I was working. When I brought it up to my managers and HR, I was told that it was "industry standard" (they love that term) and that my pay was non-negotiable.

    The worst thing about working at LaSalle Network was the overwhelming feeling that my work was completely unappreciated. I developed processes and client/candidate relationships that the company depended on and never felt any recognition for this. I also regularly suggested positive structural and developmental changes to my department that went completely unheard. I cared quite a bit about the candidates I worked closely with and wanted to see LaSalle Network succeed because I could see the potential to change lives. Unfortunately, LaSalle is entirely set in their own outdated ways and are absolutely not open to suggestion. That will be their greatest demise. LISTEN. TO. YOUR. WORKERS. THEY. HAVE. A. LOT. TO. SAY. Change is good sometimes. Take suggestions. Instead of firing people left-and-right for having different methods of doing things, try to adapt to the modern world.

    Finally, the cumulation of this entire review, the culture is toxic. I took my work home with me every night (late since I usually worked 10 hour shifts) and felt stressed and upset during every second of my life. My family regularly pointed out how my personality had changed after starting at LaSalle. It's no surprise to any logical person that forced overtime for a job that could easily be done in 8 hours a day will burn an employee out.

    So many employees have never experienced another company culture prior to joining the LaSalle cult which makes it easy for management to spread their "amazing work culture" virus. By telling these easily corruptible employees that they work for the best company ever, the employees feel like it must be true and get trapped there. I'm glad this wasn't my first job and that I was easily able to get out when the opportunity came up.

    Advice to Management

    LISTEN to the worker-bees. They're the ones doing the grunt work and they have good ideas. Change isn't always bad. You have been doing things the exact same way for 20 years. Development is good.

    Also, update your compensation and benefits package. Convert some of the million-dollar party budget or ReBirthday budget into a modern, fair benefit package for your employees (who are working above-industry-standard hours). Realize that people who are overworked deserve to be treated and paid appropriately or they will burn-out and resent their management.

    "Culture fit" is toxic terminology. Try finding people who are good "culture adds." Instead of shunning everyone that doesn't bleed green for the company, see what new perspectives and diversity they can add to the company culture. Try growing the culture instead of cutting down every person who strays the 20 year driven path.

    Tom - stop responding to Glassdoor reviews. You look childish and your employees, including management, are laughing at you behind your back. Also, stop bringing them up in company meetings. By talking about them, your employees are seeking them out and finding negative reviews they actually agree with. If you want to promote this review to the entire company, go ahead! I would love to see more good people leave that company and am happy to provide referrals to my hiring friends!

    LaSalle Network Response

    Mar 29, 2019 – President & CEO

    Wow. A lot of anger here. I’m sorry it was a terrible experience. I’ve addressed a lot in other review feedback areas, so I will only say the following.

    The fact that the ceo actually responds... More


  4. Helpful (7)

    "Good for career growth, not much else"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Project Manager in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Project Manager in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at LaSalle Network full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The people that you meet, and work with, can be some of the most energetic and motivating people. LaSalle does a very good job of creating an inter-team culture that helps to create close relationships. Additionally, most of the people at the company do care about the company's success. Some people are nice and approachable, although there's a good chunk of people that can seem outright mean.

    Training and development is a clear focus of the company. There are tons of trainings to take part of that help to become better at the job. While the training team can be condescending, they are available for 1 on 1 training when needed.

    LaSalle is very transparent with their promotion path and what it takes to get there. You are given written requirements for what is needed in order to be promoted to the next level. Managers are also pretty clear as to whether you are doing well or not at your role.

    Parties, incentive trips, client entertainment, drinks in the office, and rebirthdays are all nice perks that help to have something to look forward to. Rebirthdays are especially nice because it lets you know that you are appreciated for the work that you have put in for the past year(s).

    Cons

    A common answer for why LaSalle is great is the culture, however I would have to disagree. I think that the culture is intending to be something that it's not. Overall, it feels as though if you are not 100% sold on the company, are not okay with working long hours, are not constantly smiling or excited to be at work, and are not screaming and hyped up at the weekly meetings, that you are ruining the culture for everyone else. I think while it helps to have people who are passionate about the company, there should also be a "to each their own" understanding.

    The hours are ridiculous. To be working from 8a-6p at the minimum is overkill. Additionally, there is a wide difference between teams as some teams leave/arrive before, at, or after the scheduled work shift. While the hours should be moved to a more "work/life friendly" model, there should also be consistency across the board for work hours.

    The compensation might be stated as "industry standard" with the premise being that bonuses would make up for the terrible base salary. During my tenure at LaSalle, I had some of my best and worst quarters with the best typically ranging in a few hundred dollars more in commission than the worst. While my increase in gross margin might have been significantly more than previous quarters, my bonuses did not seem to reflect the work that was put in. I would hope that you can make good money at LaSalle, but it will not happen in the first few years which is not what you are told when you interview.

    This is something that happens at any and all organizations, but the atmosphere at LaSalle is very cliquey. There is a clear distinction during company events as to who works in what offices, especially between suburbs v city, and in what teams. There is not much you can do to force people to work together, but there is a clear preferential treatment in how offices are treated, with downtown being at the top. Moving towards a more inclusive office treatment starting with management would hopefully trickle down to the employee level; although this is probably just a side effect of focusing on hiring fresh grads.

    Benefits are not that great. 10 days of PTO, 5 sick days, and average health benefits and 401k match. The company did implement rolling holidays which was a good addition to the benefit structure.

    Advice to Management

    Some of the best hires that have been made, especially on the management side, have been from outside organizations. Really consider bringing on more outside candidates as they bring a different perspective than people promoted from within. This is especially so when you want to find people that have similar traits culture-wise, but a different viewpoint on how a company and coworkers should behave.

    It is possible to work from home and be productive. While I understand there are certain things that require teams to be in the same office (client calls, stand ups, etc), 90% of the work can easily be done at home.

    An umbrella piece of advice would be to avoid hypocrisy in how LaSalle treats employees versus how they expect employees to behave. This is in specific to the two-week notice policy. Having an employee be walked off-site following giving a professional two week notice is extremely disrespectful. Especially given that said employee worked day in and day out to contribute to the company and it's growth. If you want to continue having people leave the day of giving a notice that is totally fine. However, have the transparency of telling employees that this is the policy that will be followed. Also, do not expect employees to be "professional" and give a notice when you are totally fine having those employees be out of pay for two weeks.

    Transparency is a valuable trait any company should have, and while LaSalle does try to keep some things transparent, the overall practice could be greater. It's good that employees are informed of managers/leaders/tenured employees leaving the organization. However, being told through a flier on the wall that phone calls are being recorded by the company for "training and evaluation purposes" seems to be a bit deceptive.

    Move away from the micro managing. No one takes a job to be baby sat and a good chunk of my time at LaSalle felt like someone was constantly over my shoulder looking at my metrics, email content, phone calls, etc. Frankly, if someone is not performing, you can clearly see that in the quality that they produce. If you give employees the tools they need to succeed and the trust to be successful on their own, employee loyalty, and probably retention, will be much higher.

    The fact that LaSalle is a "best company to work for" is not something that needs to be brought up as often as it is. The surveys can be excessive and the constant reminders that you are working at the greatest company in the world seems to be an attempt to sell a burning house. We all see the awards and we all take the surveys, people will believe that LaSalle is a great company to work for without having to be reminded of it every meeting. Also, having to recite the creed as a company probably doesn't help to fight against the "cult" comments.

    Finally, keep the focus on training and development opportunities. You learn plenty of valuable on and off the job skills with LaSalle. The retreats and boot camps make it apparent that this is a company that cares about their employees and their professional development.

    LaSalle Network Response

    Mar 30, 2019 – President & CEO

    This is such an articulate, well written review. I believe this type of review is how Glassdooor was intended and I greatly appreciate your feedback.

    I agree, there can be cliques and that... More


  5. Helpful (11)

    "Avoid at ALL COSTS"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Sales in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at LaSalle Network full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good location & young, team-based group.

    Cons

    Almost everything about this place is a huge red flag. Questionable business practices at best, coupled with a CEO who demands constant praise and attention leads to a brainwashed and unoriginal workforce... Very little support from management and even less investment in professional development.

    While they do recruit for a lot of companies, sales is entirely quota and metrics-driven-- expect to work 12+ hour days, making 300+ cold calls per week in the highest stress work environment you'll ever experience. But hey, at least your anxiety will be so bad that you'll be unable to eat, saving money on lunch!!!

    LOOK ELSEWHERE FOR EMPLOYMENT. Chicago is a huge city with many, better opportunities. Keep looking and don't make the same mistake so many of us previously have.

    Advice to Management

    Change everything you're doing now--50%+ of annual turnover. If you lose roughly half of your employees each year, something needs to change.

    LaSalle Network Response

    Mar 30, 2019 – President & CEO

    To say we offer very little professional development is just not true. We have one trainer for every 50 employee. That’s a terrific ratio. Management is heavily involved in recruiting and sales, out... More


  6. Helpful (16)

    "A cult like atmosphere"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Recruiter in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Senior Recruiter in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at LaSalle Network full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Pay and location are decent

    Cons

    If you enjoy working in a company that revolves around the cult like atmosphere of a narcissistic CEO where everyone must drink his version of the Jonestown koolaide then this place is for you. Lots of very questionable activity with a car salesman’s approach to recruitment.

    Advice to Management

    I think the above is sufficient

    LaSalle Network Response

    Mar 29, 2019 – President & CEO

    I have a few thoughts here.

    1. When did Glassdoor (and Yelp) become a place to just trash a company or business rather than give insightful critique, positive and negative?
    2. If our company... More


  7. Helpful (6)

    "Research"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at LaSalle Network full-time

    Pros

    Great atmosphere, people are nice.

    Cons

    Poor pay with high expectations. Micromanagement, no work from home option when it is definitely possible to work from home.

    Advice to Management

    N/a

    LaSalle Network Response

    Mar 30, 2019 – President & CEO

    Thanks for the comment. We are working on trying to see if a work from home option is viable— it’s hard to train and coach and develop when people aren’t in the same room with managers and trainers... More

  8. Helpful (8)

    "Regarding the OAK BROOK Location."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at LaSalle Network full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Their app made reporting my time a breeze, and I always received my pay on time.

    Cons

    I worked for this agency for four months. Once the assignment was up, they had no other opportunities for me because they mostly serve Oak Brook, and the surrounding area. I understood that, and filed for unemployment so I could keep my head above water until A - they either came up with another assignment near me, as the assignment I filled for them, was in my surrounding area, or B - I found permanent employment. THIS AGENCY HAS HARASSED ME THE ENTIRE TIME I HAVE BEEN ON UNEMPLOYMENT BY BLATANTLY LYING TO Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES) TO TRY AND GET ME CUT OFF!!! When you apply for benefits through IDES, you have to keep a record of having searched for work at least one day every week. Who can't prove that!? considering that what you receive from IDES is barely enough to keep your head above water! So you can definitely meet that criteria! Even though I was calling LaSalle Network once a week, THEY STILL CONTACTED IDES AND TOLD THEM THAT I HAD NOT BEEN IN TOUCH WITH THEM IN AN EFFORT TO GET ME CUT OFF, SO THEY WOULDN'T HAVE TO PAY. When I called them and asked what the heck was going on, considering they knew good and well I had been in touch with them, AND I COULD PROVE IT!! they'd apologize, and the EMAIL ME A LETTER TO SUPPLY TO IDES STATING THAT I HAD IN FACT BEEN IN TOUCH WITH THEM. This has happened 4 times!! and I've only been receiving benefits for 3 months!! (they contacted them twice one month with the same BS!!) so you tell me if it's been by mistake! EACH TIME THEY WERE PROVEN TO BE LIARS!! Even so, it still caused a delay in my benefits, because IDES treats you as if you're guilty by holding your benefits until you prove they're lying AGAIN (even though they've done it 4 darn times already!!) causing my rent to almost be late on two different occasions, or me to have to reschedule a job interview due to not having enough gas to get there, when I would have had enough, had my funds not been delayed due to a lie! So there you have it, an agency who goes out of there way to try and get your only source of income cut off, even though they don't have any work for you!!! YOU'VE BEEN WARNED!!! Which was something I wasn't lucky enough to have received!! Now I don't know if all locations practice this, as my experience was only with the Oak Brook location.

    Advice to Management

    STOP harassing candidates you can't supply with work, by blatantly lying on them because they're drawing unemployment security.


  9. Helpful (22)

    "Stop setting us up for failure"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Oak Brook, IL
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Oak Brook, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at LaSalle Network full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    My manager was the most supportive and helpful person I ever worked for and I honestly loved working under this person
    Access to senior leadership
    Great, fun company culture
    Great benefits
    Paid volunteer hours
    Room for growth (if you make it)

    Cons

    So here’s the thing. I loved LaSalle with all my heart and soul and gave my everything to this job and this company. I was on the sales team. They tell you that LaSalle will invest in you and train you and develop you which I do believe is true. I received more coaching here than anywhere and I believe that I have developed immensely as a professional because of LaSalle. However the problem lies in the industry and the expectations they set for their new hires and how that ends up playing out in real life. Basically they will train you and develop you to a point, and when push comes to shove and you hit a wall, they will let you fall on your face and say goodbye to you. Their bench marks for sales individuals are very rigid and they are not as transparent with you as they should be regarding what happens should you not hit them. I was told that they were a guideline in the beginning and then when I missed one my job was immediately threatened.

    These things are ultimately pieces that are out of your control. And when you ask people for help, feedback or advice all the senior sales people tell you that it takes time to develop in staffing and that your relationships and book of business won’t happen in just 6 months—yet that’s the time frame they give you to hit what they consider to be “basic” benchmarks. Other salespeople tell you that everyone is different and grows at different rates and that the sales cycle is long so you need to be patient. But then in the same breath they want to know where your job orders are and how come you haven’t landed a massive project for the team. There’s also some issues with culture between offices. Downtown are the golden boys of the company and you will find that if you work in the suburbs you will not feel as valued to the team as they are. The same can be said when it comes to junior/entry level sales people and the seniors. At the company wide weekly meeting they will pat a VP of Sales on the back over and over for landing huge projects for the company, but they don’t provide the same for an entry level person getting their first job order or their first new client. Which in my opinion both are important to keep new people engaged and feeling like they matter.
    Going back to doing sales in the suburbs, you are basically set up the fail. They will compare you to the people downtown and their ability to earn business not understanding the pace of suburban life not to mention the pace at which suburban companies move which is much slower than downtown. Essentially it’s not that the business isn’t there it’s that it takes longer to get to for a multitude of reasons than it does working downtown. As of right now their suburban sales team is comprised of only 2 people with 3+ years with the company. All of the others are under a year. In the hires that they’ve made out in the suburbs in the past 2 years they have had close to 75% turnover of everyone who has been there 6/9 have been let go or quit and I can say that the folks who are there now don’t look like they’ll make it either since they aren’t trending to hit goals either. All of them are less than 6 months. There has yet to be a new suburban sales person to make these benchmarks that they claim should be so doable. One minute they tell you you’re doing great and then the next they’re telling you youre “not a good fit” and they get rid of you.

    Not to mention the fact that the sales team is incredibly cliquey and you feel like you have to break your back just to get them to like you or fit in. This is only the case downtown. The younger but successful salespeople are condescending and the older ones who have been with the company for a while just tell you “it will take time don’t worry.” And they try to mentor you from a distance while being a part of their boys club where nobody is allowed in the inner circle.
    They say that project managers have a symbiotic relationship with sales but then we have to have meetings about how to be nicer to the project managers and how we have to spend time with a project manager/recruiter once a week in order to get them to like us so they’ll work on our orders. You’re in a position where you have to sell to the team why your order is important after having just made 60 cold calls in 3 hours and going on meetings and busting your butt to get the order in the first place.

    On top of it your base salary is what some administrative assistants you help recruit make. All the work you put in with little to no reward. But they tell you your commissions are where it’s at. Then you get your bonus check after all your hard work blood sweat and tears and realize you’re still broke because you don’t have a 70 person temp project like the seniors do and “it will take time to get there” but also “why don’t you have a huge temp project?”

    Advice to Management

    ELT - the culture you have created at LaSalle is wonderful, and I would have stayed forever if you let me. However your rigidness in pushing fresh graduates who have never had a sales career in an already difficult industry with a high learning curve to hit benchmarks that may be easy for one person but not for another is really off base. You can’t say that you invest in training and development and then fire people at the first sign of difficulty or struggle in a role. You say you want people who are open to feedback and who want to grow. I wanted to grow and I always asked for help from everyone around me. But whenever I asked seniors for help I got “it’s a long sales cycle this is going to take time and it doesn’t take the same amount of time for everyone you have to be patient.” And then in the same breath it’s “but where are my job orders why aren’t you producing?” I think that people deserve more than 6 months to prove themselves. Especially if they’re just coming out of college. You’re setting people up for failure on the sales team ESPECIALLY in the suburbs. There are so many people coming in and out of those offices, your project managers don’t even take them seriously so then our orders aren’t prioritized which means we don’t hit our goals. Then you fire us.

    Let’s not forget the fact that the suburbs is always being compared to downtown and you refuse to believe that the suburbs is slower paced and it takes much more time to cultivate relationships with clients here. The competition downtown is more fierce, but there is more opportunity. Here you’re either looking at MASSIVE companies that will take time to get into (which is fine if you set expectations longer than 6 months) or tiny companies that will maybe use your services once or twice. COUNTLESS TIMES I was told to make calls OUTSIDE my territory because you guys knew that there wasn’t enough for me to prospect. I stayed late hours and farmed leads and researched nightly. I worked my hardest I’ve ever worked and I tried my best and it was never good enough.

    I love LaSalle but you set me up (and all of us up) for failure and I find that to be absolutely unforgivable.

    Look at all your top producers. How long have they been with the company? Your average tenure for a salesperson who produces major accounts is 3 years. If your best people wouldn’t have made it if they were held to the new standards you have now, then your system is broken. I know these “benchmarks” were recently created and only the people downtown have been able to hit them. Something isn’t right here if only 2 out of 12 hires in 2 years have lived up to this standard. That’s 16% retention.

    If you believe in training and development then practice it. Help people get where you want them to be. If they work hard and they care about the company and they want to improve and sell more for you, that’s someone you want. Stop trying to standardize a system for people when people cannot be standardized. Either that, or choose to hire more tenured people from the staffing industry and pay them more.

    LaSalle Network Response

    Nov 12, 2018 – President & CEO

    This is not even close to being a fair representation of your time with our company. We had multiple coaching sessions with you, direct feedback to not achieving set goals.... that other people... More


  10. "Account Executive"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at LaSalle Network full-time

    Pros

    Great management at all times.

    Cons

    Industry can be difficult at times

    LaSalle Network Response

    Mar 30, 2019 – President & CEO

    Thanks for taking the time to comment and appreciate management :)