Lear Corporation Software Engineer Reviews | Glassdoor

Lear Corporation Software Engineer Reviews

Updated Oct 14, 2019

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3.6
79%
Recommend to a Friend
91%
Approve of CEO
Lear Corporation CEO Ray Scott
Ray Scott
5 Ratings
  1. "Lear Corp"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Systems & Software Engineer in Southfield, MI
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Lear Corporation for less than a year

    Pros

    Lear had good benefits and the workload was an acceptable amount. It was a relaxed environment and coworkers were good.

    Cons

    Lear was designed products that didn't interest me but was a good place to learn. However, the career advancement seemed slower that normal.

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    Lear Corporation2016-05-15
  2. Helpful (8)

    "Paralyzed By The Big Picture And Crisis Management, Instead Of Being Proactive"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Southfield, MI
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Lear Corporation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    -Food is decent -Coworkers are nice -Dress code is progressive -Shorter Fridays -Expanded parking lot

    Cons

    Working at Lear is much akin to working in a restaurant, except all the dishes are already burnt and only minutes away from bursting into flames. In a properly managed kitchen, everything should be mise en place. But at Lear, the oven is always a little too hot, the timers are always a little too slow, and all of us are debating whether or not a tomato is a vegetable or a fruit. Strangely, the primary function of any employee at Lear is not to cook. No, their duties are relegated to that of an involuntary firefighter. And the people who know how to extinguish flames will get more recognition than the people with superior cooking skills, which demonstrates how Lear rewards reactivity over productivity. At any time, one of the dishes could spontaneously combust and burn down the entire restaurant, but we just pray with our lives that we get to serve that dish before it detonates. And if the dish we serve ends up being an inedible, ersatz mess, just barely resembling a cauterized char, so be it. At least the restaurant is still intact, right? The funny thing is that the Lear chefs have a cookbook, and if they followed that cookbook, the restaurant wouldn’t need to be in a constant state of disarray. Indeed, someone else has already perfected the recipes for every dish Lear desires. But somehow, Lear still struggles to make even the most basic foods. And that is because every time directions are laid out in plain English (since Lear doesn’t like to deal with any foreign languages outside of “Learisms”) nobody follows them. Instead of abiding, the chefs at Lear will haughtily insist on reverse-engineering the dishes. Just, why? Literally, we could be making spaghetti with the instructions printed on the box, and instead of obeying what’s written, we’d scope out the competition to test whether or not we can recreate a hackneyed version of their pasta. It’s a bizarre fixation on trying to plagiarize, instead of adhering to the rubric. You know how foreign restaurants will often have menus in different languages if they have international patrons? For instance, the Japanese restaurant down the street from Lear offers an English version of its menu, even though the restaurant's owner is Japanese. Well, at Lear, even though it does business with customers in 39 countries, the menu is, and has only ever been, offered in English. Yes, the ideals of American exceptionalism run adamantly deep at this establishment. So if you don’t speak English, you can’t dine here. And when restaurant critics bring up that all the other establishments cater to speakers of other languages, Lear says it’s too difficult to implement such a change. Sure, even though everyone else has no problems with offering a menu in Spanish and Chinese at a minimum, somehow the feat is just too cumbersome at Lear. Well, it’s only had a hundred years to find a solution, so the answer hasn’t been reverse-engineered yet... Speaking of restaurant critics, these are a group that Lear cares intensely about, because they control its funding. For many years, Lear has tried its hand at being some type of two-in-one restaurant, selling both comfort-food burgers and trendy sashimi. At some places, this mixed menu may work, but the critics of Lear have never understood the setup. Does Lear sell American food or Japanese food? Why can’t it make up its mind? Well, not wanting to give up one or the other, the company started a campaign to market itself as a “fusion” restaurant, but the phrase never did catch on. One would think that if the reviews of these critics truly mattered that Lear would do what they were demanding: separate into a sushi bar and a burger joint. But, no, even though the mandate was quite clear, the company decided that it could still sell the fusion idea by holding a special reception banquet. The banquet was a splendid and exorbitant display. And even though the critics never expressed an interest in such an event, the hope was that this lavish spectacle would be enough to stupefy them. In the end, the critics seemed placated; but the very next day, the reviews came in and they were still dismal. Hindsight is 20/20, but I was not the only one who expressed doubt that the banquet was a bad strategy to begin with. What is the opposite of a good idea with poor execution? A terrible plan with perfect implementation — which some may rightly say is the worser of the two. Congregating all the critics into one space, only to tell them that their primary suggestions weren’t being adopted? There’s not enough razzle-dazzle in the world to prevent someone from seeing right through that. The real shame is that those hundreds of thousands of dollars and man-hours spent for that sole ordeal couldn’t have been used in a more productive manner, such as upgrading the kitchen equipment for the staff. Even constructing that much requested walking path would’ve been a better use of the money. At least that could lend some tangible health benefits. The threat of a fire is always omnipresent. But how does a company reach such a point that the busser who points to the obvious has his apprehensions so easily dismissed? Culture, unsurprisingly. You see, at Lear there is a pervasive culture of taking things to a higher level. “High level” is a colloquialism at Lear, a Learism, which has an erroneous meaning not found in any standard dictionary. At Lear, the phrase translates to “big picture” and perhaps is etymologically related to the idea of an executive summary, aka high-level summary. This phrase is so ubiquitous that it's even thrown around during interviews. (E.g. “Are you more detail-oriented or high-level?”) I think the thought process is that by saying “high level” that any granular item can be dangerously ignored as a peripheral, frivolous footnote. After all, what is higher level than making sure we have RIPE tomatoes? That we have tomatoes at all. And what is higher level than having tomatoes at all? That we have tomato sauce. What is higher level than tomato sauce? That we have pasta. What’s higher level than that? That we have food. What’s higher than that? That we have money. Everything is downplayed to focus on the supposed larger issue at hand. Obviously, this fallacious logic can repeat ad nauseam until one reaches “finding the meaning of the universe.” Or maybe even higher level than that would be discovering the purpose of existence itself. Suffice it to say, zooming out to an ever-growing larger picture is neither a talent, nor a difficult skill to acquire. By restating an issue as broader, more generic, and more nebulous, it just leads to there being no solution at all. If the entirety of the world’s top philosophers haven’t been to answer mankind’s “highest level” problems over the past several millennia, I doubt that a thirty-minute meeting between Lear employees disguised as a “high-level” brainstorming session is going to accomplish much, if anything. As an aside, if “high level” infers that the Golden Gate Bridge were simply created as a structure to connect the San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean, then I would probably never feel safe driving my car over it. That is how I feel about anyone who uses “high level” as a scapegoat for enabling mediocrity. It’s a vapid tool used to end conversations and dismiss concerns, instead of encouraging discussions. I would be empathetic of this obsession with the big picture, if Lear employees were known for being inordinately detail-oriented and meticulous, but that really isn't a part of the Lear culture, so this broad-view fixation tends to be more harmful than helpful. Ultimately, if I were to distill the major issues at Lear, they would be myopia, disorganization, minimization, and attention deficiency. And that’s not even touching upon the microagressions of white supremacy that appear to exist in at least one department, which could probably substantiate the existence of white exclusionary feminism as a real phenomenon. Seriously, if you just did the math on the amount of blue-eyed individuals, considering the population makeup of the US, it is disgustingly skewed in favor of a certain phenotype. That is to say, I strongly believe that some people are blind to their own prejudices. Of course, a lack of diversity is to be expected at any place that incubates nepotism, but that's a whole other topic. On the rare occasion you voice a concern and it’s not dismissed as inconsequential, it will be heard — albeit limitedly. That is, until someone smells smoke in the air, and everyone’s attention shifts to the next burning topic du jour. Initiatives at Lear are as transient as waves crashing along a beach, extending only to a certain line before receding from the shore. None of the problems Lear has faced, and will face, are anything new; they’re all just mindless, unsurprising reiterations of obstacles that weren’t properly stymied in the first place. It’s an endless, reactionary cycle of playing catch-up, and management is never ahead of the curve. But the only real losers in this game are the employees, the replaceables, the apparent dispensables.

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    Lear Corporation2019-03-15
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  4. "Good company to work for"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer 
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Lear Corporation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The company and policies are good for the employees. Employees get opportunity to work on various projects

    Cons

    Need to work more in employee feedback

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    Lear Corporation2019-10-15
  5. "Full of learning and hard work."

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer() in Rabat
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Lear Corporation full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Big chance to learn more about automotive,

    Cons

    The overload of working tasks !

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    Lear Corporation2019-06-08
  6. "Conducive atmosphere for professional growth"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Embedded Software Engineer I in Pune
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Lear Corporation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Flexible hours, more than adequate yearly leaves. It's developing from a low cost centre to an advanced engineering centre on Lears global map.

    Cons

    Limited recreation facilities, inadequate parking.

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    Lear Corporation2019-04-25
  7. "Work"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Lead Software Engineer in Pune
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Lear Corporation full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Good, Challenging work.for initial level company is good

    Cons

    Internal politics,no growth after certain level

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    Lear Corporation2018-11-07
  8. "Could be better in terms of compensation to the employees"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Development Engineer in Mactan, Lapu-Lapu
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Lear Corporation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    good training good work life balance good work ethics

    Cons

    the worst benefits and compensation package the lowest salary slow promotion low appraisal

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    Lear Corporation2018-09-10
  9. "Great place to work"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Mumbai
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Lear Corporation full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Great place ,Good work,Good culture

    Cons

    Salary ,long vision ,future enhancement

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    Lear Corporation2018-08-21
  10. "Embedded Software Engineer"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Embeeded Software Engineer in Rabat
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Lear Corporation full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Learn good technical skills and automotive tools. Good for beginners.

    Cons

    Low salary. Bad environment. No career plan.

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    Lear Corporation2018-02-24
  11. "Software Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Rabat

    I have been working at Lear Corporation full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Great Learning opportunity Good colleagues

    Cons

    Salaries, Extra hours not paid, Poor Communication

    Lear Corporation2017-11-03
Found 26 reviews