Loomis Sayles & Company Reviews | Glassdoor

Loomis Sayles & Company Reviews

Updated December 14, 2017
48 reviews

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3.5
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Kevin Patrick Charleston
29 Ratings

48 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • We are not talking about just good people passing through the ranks with similar qualifications (in 2 reviews)

  • The senior leadership team there is basically useless (in 2 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Administrative"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time

    Pros

    Benefits package, flexibility in schedule

    Cons

    very little mobility within company


  2. "Compliance Specialist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time

    Pros

    Benefits and compensation; location to MBTA

    Cons

    Lack of growth, movement within firm; poor management

    Advice to Management

    If you are aware that an employee is unhappy, work with them to make a change for the better. Instilling false hope just to keep an employee is not acceptable.

  3. Helpful (1)

    "Great management and benefits"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time

    Pros

    Management Team is dedicated and engaged. Colleagues are qualified and skilled.

    Cons

    Challenges with transition to a larger firm impede change in some less visible areas.

    Advice to Management

    Identify areas for modernization


  4. Helpful (5)

    "Hand slapping and pettiness at its BEST.."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Investment Analyst in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Investment Analyst in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Profit sharing and bonus and location, there are a few very good people I found. Healthcare is ok and hours.
    They will reimburse for purchasing printers and computers.

    Cons

    Blatant inequities between management and staff. They do zero to build you up only tell you what you’ve done wrong, zero ability to manage or solve problems. Their goals are to work as little as possible yet have you always there to make them look good.

    Advice to Management

    Find the bad seeds and get rid of them, they are simply driving hard working people out and causing turn over and exorbitant recruiting fees.


  5. Helpful (3)

    "Not a Good Place to Work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Very few, but out of those, the bonus and profit sharing. The healthcare costs are low and there are some nice healthcare perks.

    Cons

    Many of the managers, those who directly or in directly manage a team, are generally not transparent and do not advocate for their team. Many of them are not qualified to even be considered managers, both in levels of experience and training, and general "people skills." Anyone would be hard pressed to find these people in management positions at any of the area’s “Best Places to Work" (of which Loomis Sayles is not named as one). Their sole purpose is maintain the status quo so that their team can keep the higher-ups satiated with every miniscule demand met. Keeping of this status quo entails collecting water cooler gossip of their direct reports and then chatting about it with other managers and also bringing it up to their reports in a formal settings. For some reason, at Loomis Sayles, this kind of behavior is not only rewarded but necessary for the manager to thrive in his/her position.
    Another big issue that causes strife among the employees is the working from home "policy." The policy doesn't actually exist, therefore some people have it worked out where they can schedule in work from home days and that's fine, where for others it's virtually impossible.
    It's also important to note that the working environment is far less than ideal. It is a very stale, sterile, environment that is quieter than a library. Cheerfulness and smiles are rare. Zero fun. No work hard play hard - just work and go home. Interactions among different employee groups take time and are not facilitated by the company in any genuine way. It's very rare that there is ever a company sponsored event or happy hour to show employee appreciation. In the year's past they have done away with the company holiday gathering that would be held in downtown Boston.

    Advice to Management

    Actually vet and hire managers that know how to interact with people. All managers should be subject to 360 reviews and get feedback on how effective they are at leading a team. If they can't lead and advocate for their team then they don't belong in that position. Training is a good start but it's really about their interactions and how well they mesh with the team.
    Please do something about the work environment, people are leaving in DROVES because it actually is so bad. Most companies these days have Thursday drinks whether in the office or outside of the office so people can unwind in a relaxed atmosphere and connect with their colleagues. It doesn't cost much do put on something like this once a month and you would most likely see a shift in attitude throughout the firm.


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Legal and Compliance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Profit sharing & health insurance.

    Cons

    Management is out for themselves and the firm does not promote from within as it did in the past. The raises are not as good as they used to be with the prior CEO and there is a lot of turnover. Management takes 2 hours gym breaks . Employees employees in non-management positions are not allowed to even take a full hour of lunch. HR has no policy on working remotely however in other departments it's allowed. If you work for nice managers you get to work remotely once a week.

    Advice to Management

    Treat everyone the same and stop showing favoritism. Need to attend more meetings with everyone not just with the managers that sugar coat the problems in the groups.


  7. Helpful (3)

    "Not bad but a lot of growing pains"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Legal Analyst in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Senior Legal Analyst in Boston, MA

    I have been working at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Great benefits and bonuses. A lot of people have been here a long time, which can be good and bad. Will sponsor if you need series registrations.

    Cons

    No actual WFH policy is in writing. It is dependent on manager and most will not allow it. HR support is almost nonexistent. Technology is very old and disruptive. They come in and change systems without user buy-in. There is still a very old school, boy's room culture.

    Advice to Management

    Send employee surveys more frequently. They should be sent annually and more action taken from them, not just lip service. WFH policy needs to be standard and equally across the entire company.

  8. Helpful (3)

    "do not recommend to anyone"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time

    Pros

    cons outweigh any possible pros

    Cons

    not a good working environment


  9. Helpful (12)

    "Terrible for women"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Close to train station, profit sharing, tuition reimbursement, cheerful decor in office

    Cons

    Sexual Harassment, wrongful termination and retaliation is allowed. Women are inherently worth less to management. In my opinion, LS goes to great lengths to disguise their misogyny by launching phony women's initiatives and well-timed promotions in response.

    It seems to me that the only time they are really interested is when another women has filed a discrimination suit or has filed a complaint so they can find some bought and paid for unknowing fool who is willing to sing their praises. The sad reality is those women probably should have been promoted years ago. If you look at their latest program aimed at attracting young women to investment management, I doubt that will ever be taken seriously-just something they roll their eyes at in private.

    I doubt that they would ever extend an offer to any exceptionally bright young women that pass through it. If they ever did, some other woman, in my opinion, would have to get discriminated against first.

    Girls, in my opinion, you go work for them, you better really enjoy the job you take because you are going to have it forever or until some pervert gets you fired. And while you are working hard year after year and still have 5 roommates make sure you have the stomach to watch your less qualified or similarly qualified male counterparts pass through the ranks. We are not talking about just good people passing through the ranks with similar qualifications.

    They will pass you over for total screw ups. The type that routinely leaves early to go to hockey games, goes on Facebook all day, plays video games, over bills the company in hours worked so they can go to Myrtle Beach for a few rounds of golf that they can't afford it, over bills the company so they can spread money around the Boston bars and sexually harasses people.

     Just to give you a clear picture of some of your future coworkers, imagine someone with little other professional experience, the company is shelling out 7-10k a semester for school, they get to leave hours early to attend school and are still being paid, gets to leave hours early for no particular reason and still being paid, salary in 50k range, plays video games all day long, has company paid for health insurance that is heavily subsidized so the cost is negligible, receives "overtime" pay in addition to salary, his boss covering for him for sexually harassing a woman, boss attempts to bully woman on his behalf, receives profit sharing, receives a cash bonus, has never made the company a dime, complains and STILL thinks he is underprivileged like he is some child born in the ghetto of Detroit without a father.

    These employees along with their supervisor would complain about nepotism at the firm, children of the affluent they don't even know and have a general attitude like they weren't getting their fair share. These people feel entitled to the highest salaries, every perk imaginable and sleeping with the women in the office. If one woman doesn't want to sleep with someone in the office and history repeats itself, then you are going to have a problem with about 8 of them. They preemptively threaten women there with violence, talk about how their friends are "powerful people", how they are going to be finished in this business. These people are a ridiculous sexist cliché.

    The senior leadership team there is basically useless. All they care about is conformity and everyone getting along. In my opinion, you could steal from them, sexually harass people, stalk women, be foolish enough to actually tell the women you are sexually harassing to sue the firm, be as dumb as a stump and still get promoted as long as you look like a boring, polo shirt wearing male.

    The leadership team won't take a hardline position against sexual harassment and they will tell you the reason is that they don't want to falsely accuse a man, but these same people have absolutely no trouble believing a woman is incompetent, made the whole thing up, crazy, etc even though she had acceptable performance prior to her complaint and poor performance after the complaint. Or things like every woman who works for the accused leaves in a year or so. In my opinion, they won't look too hard for the truth because the accused fits in ever so neatly. In my opinion, more likely though, they will know exactly what the men have done and saying something along the lines of keep denying it and let's keep that between you and me....if anyone asks I don't know.

    These guys love how the leadership team destroys anyone who rejects them. It validates them professionally and as men.

    The women there want their basic rights, to work hard and if they are qualified for a job to at least have the opportunity to be considered whereas this group of prima donnas are routinely catered to without regard to their actual contribution to the firm.

    Consider your options fully before joining this firm because you may, at some point, have to pay for your child's education, make mortgage payments or have to pay for your aging parent's care. These people are truly disgusting and it is disturbing how differently they present themselves. TAKE THIS VERY SERIOUSLY, IT WILL NOT MATTER HOW HARD YOU WORK, THE RESULTS YOU PRODUCE, HOW QUICKLY YOU LEARN, HOW WELL EDUCATED YOU ARE, HOW FOCUSED YOU ARE, YOUR WILLINGNESS AND ABILITY TO DEVELOP OTHER PEOPLE-YOUR CAREER WILL HINGE ON YOUR WILLINGNESS TO SUBJUGATE YOURSELF TO THE WHIMS OF YOUR MALE COWORKERS. FOR THE WOMEN WHO WORK THERE PRESENTLY, MANY THINGS TAKE PLACE AT THAT FIRM THAT YOU MAY NOT EVER BECOME PRIVY TO BECAUSE OF COVER UP JOBS, PLAN YOUR CAREER ACCORDINGLY.

    Not all of the men that work there are terrible, but there is a significant amount that are total degenerates. If you can tolerate women being referred to as "fresh meat", being called the c word for no particular reason, being a grown woman being referred to as a "daddy's girl"; listening to men talk about "fisting" their target of the moment. Apply

    If you are a man reading this, the problematic men have competed against better qualified men and have gotten the job!

    Advice to Management

    It is absolutely pointless to give these people advice. You can't change biases and that sort of deranged sick thinking.

    If hell froze over and you really wanted to help women out, how about you not allow sexual harassment, retaliation and wrongful termination for starters.

    You want women to be interested in entry level research jobs, why not go look at people in entry level roles in other departments. You are guaranteed to find capable, interested and qualified people to take those roles. First though, you probably should get rid of any department managers who openly state that they don't like to hire women.

    Not to imply that your recent initiative is foolish, it probably should be launched elsewhere. Some of the men there seem to have the attitude that women expect reparations for ills other women suffered long ago, special treatment, lesser standards and the belief that we attribute every personal failure or shortcoming to sexism.


  10. "Great Company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Loomis Sayles & Company full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Health Benefits, 401K, location to public transportation

    Cons

    Flexibility throughout the firm could be more consistent.


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