McMaster-Carr Reviews in Los Angeles, CA | Glassdoor

McMaster-Carr Los Angeles Reviews

Updated April 9, 2017
10 reviews

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Los Angeles, CA

1.8
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Jay Delaney
6 Ratings

10 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • No room for advancement, Expect to much from employees (in 16 reviews)

  • I entered management in 2013 and went through the Management Trainee recruiting process (in 33 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Great place to cut your teeth"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Operations Manager in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Operations Manager in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at McMaster-Carr full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Benefits, responsibility from the get-go, insanely smart coworkers

    Cons

    Little control over your own career path

    Advice to Management

    Minimize the hype around planning.


  2. Helpful (3)

    "Sales"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Sales Associate in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Sales Associate in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at McMaster-Carr (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    The salary and benefits are excellent.

    Cons

    Limited opportunities for development and growth

    Advice to Management

    Invest in people, not processes.

  3. Helpful (8)

    "Culture of Fear"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at McMaster-Carr full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Benefits are good and you will likely receive a large profit sharing bonus. They will pay for school, which is the only reason to work here.

    Cons

    You will fear for your job security every hour of every day. Every week someone gets fired. If you are not hired on as a manager you will never be promoted. Your boss will be 22 years old with a degree in english lit and zero work experience, and they will tell you when to take your 15 minute break. You will be micromanaged to the extreme and there is zero corporate communication. Imagine a 20k square foot office where all you hear all day are keyboards clicking, then the person sitting next to you suddenly disappears, and not a word is spoken. Steer clear.

    Advice to Management

    Change. The writing is on the wall.


  4. Helpful (13)

    "Intense and Stressful but Amazing Stepping Stone"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Operations Specialist in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Business Operations Specialist in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at McMaster-Carr (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    You will be working with some of the brightest and most intelligent people around. McMaster does a really good job recruiting. I was always impressed by those around me.

    The work-life balance is good. Once your 8 hours are up, you're done. There's no answering calls or emails outside of work.

    The pay and benefits are great. They pay some employee close to $100K a year to perform data entry. No joke. Insurance is completely paid for. Year end bonuses fluctuate but were always fantastic while I was there.

    They pay 100% of tuition and books, regardless of the degree, so long as the institution is accredited. I used the opportunity to get a Masters Degree in something I was personally interested in.

    Cons

    The work environment is stressful at best. The mindset is "we pay you well, so work for it." You're always behind on your work and will rarely catch up. As soon as you finish one task, three more are added.

    The work can be boring. As mentioned earlier, employees get paid to perform data entry 8 hours a day. In my capacity, hours were spent reviewing purchase orders for errors on a daily basis. It was a struggle to stay focused and motivated.

    Management can nitpick. There are no small mistakes. I was lectured for not signing internal notes correctly, told that I "needed to get it together." I showed up to work two minutes late (literally, not figuratively) due to traffic and my manager had a "sit down" with me regarding my tardiness. I understand being corrected but the severity of even the smallest sins led to an environment of feedback avoidance. People would literally avoid certain pieces of work if there was a high risk of feedback.

    Management mostly sucks. Instead of promoting from within, McMaster recruits recent college graduates from prestigious universities in order to be “Management Trainees.” They essentially climb the ranks from Trainee, to Supervisor, to Manager, usually within a year or two. As you can imagine, this causes a high level of resentment from longtime, established employees. I did not envy the added pay and prestige that came with the “Management Trainee” position. More often than not, I felt sorry for them. Most of these trainees fail, usually at the Supervisor stage. I think the average lifespan of a “Management Trainee” is about 9 months. As you can imagine, this leads to incredible turnover. In my 4 years, I had somewhere around 8 immediate Supervisors. They’re almost always newer than you and less familiar with the work but will be providing feedback within weeks. You often find yourself changing the way you work as you constantly cater to new audiences. It’s frustrating.

    There is an absolute lack of empathy. You’re given unlimited sick days but secretly you’re not supposed to take any. I took 4 in a given year and it was brought up negatively during an annual review. Around 10% of the workforce is fired yearly. In my first few months, 3 employee in my department were let go as well as an employee of 23 years from another department. It was very stressful, the constant fear that you may be next. You are never safe and the culture reflects that.

    Advice to Management

    I'm very grateful for the opportunities I was given at McMaster. I just think the management structure and corporate culture could use revamping.


  5. Helpful (16)

    "Don't work here. Or if you do, get out as soon as you can."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Operations Specialist in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Business Operations Specialist in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at McMaster-Carr full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    I met a small handful of really great coworkers here. Apart from that, the only pro is the free healthcare, the year-end bonus, and the inflated salary. Really though, you earn every penny.

    Cons

    Where does one start? This company is weird. They've managed to turn white-collar work into a blue-collar process. No one person knows anything about the company beyond their own role. Only the highest levels of management seem to know what the company trajectory is, though most of the time I felt like even the branch directors were making it up as they went along. And the lower down the chain of command you go, the less and less people seem to know and yet they're in charge of entire departments. Because of this, the department focus or direction frequently changes. And so starts the endless cycle of blame and "feedback."

    This company puts such an emphasis on "feedback" that it has created a toxic environment of endless criticism, undermining behavior, passive aggressive attacking, and a habit of pushing the blame off on someone else. It's so bad that you go into work expected to hear nothing but backhanded, rude remarks that subtly question your intelligence. And when you don't get that "feedback" you're actually surprised and mildly worried about it because when the "feedback" stops, they've usually already decided you're going to be shown the door.

    There is next to no positive reinforcement which only makes you feel like your work isn't valued. The work is already mindless crap that could have been automated ages ago. The company doesn't reward good work even though some employees have been there for DECADES. You will not be given more responsibility, you will not be promoted if you're a regular "business operations specialist" and you will be carelessly transferred to another department when the mood strikes a supervisor or manager and have that lateral move described as a "good thing." It's not. They just needed you in that department because they probably just fired the last guy.

    This company is clogged with management. They're constantly parading more and more candidates through the office who are interviewing for the "management trainee" program. Almost all of them are soon to be college graduates from highly recognizable universities (though this seems to be changing because more and more of these top tier candidates seem to be turning them down, according to a manager.) These Management trainee college grads are immediately given supervisor positions (though usually in the warehouse or the text contact department) and expected to know how to motivate and lead employees, with next to no work experience let alone leadership experience. They all inevitably fall into the habit of parroting the more "experienced" managers and fall back on nit picking and criticizing every little thing an employee does in a sad attempt to justify their pointless position and make it seem like they're "managing." I guess it's nice to hear when a genuinely incompetent manager is demoted back to a supervisor role and eventually shown the door.

    None of the "skills" are transferable. You learn nothing and they do this intentionally. If this is your first job out of college, know that you are royally screwed if you want to leave. Your work is meaningless and the sad fact is that any company worth working for will be able to see that on your resume. Before you think I'm some sort of disgruntled employee that was fired or let go, I left voluntarily. I knew this wasn't the place for me after six months and carefully set money aside in case they went through a random round of firings. I casually searched for a new position and when the right one came up, with a better salary and better opportunities, I took it and ran as fast as I could and haven't regretted it once.

    Advice to Management

    Look at your poor retention. Look at how often you have to hire people for a position you just filed three months ago. You're doing something wrong if three to nine months later people you thought were cut out for the work are fired or leave. There's no way that so many people ended up bad fits. It's the measuring stick you're using. One look at the people who manage to survive for 5, 10, 15 years really makes you see what it takes to survive at this terrible company. They're all disgruntled, bitter, back stabbing trolls that will do anything to point out a mistake a newer employee made just to ensure the new employee gets fired before the more experienced employee is even considered. And a handful have managed to worm their way into inappropriate friendships with managers that cover their back and mask their mistakes while busting others for the same exact mistakes. Hire experienced workers for the management positions and stop reinforcing bad habits and training new managers in the image of managers who've been their too long and have gotten complacent.

    This company doesn't take social media or online marketing seriously at all. They don't have an active web presence beyond the website which is disturbing when most of their orders now come in through email and the website. They don't seem to think that they should be actively promoting their apps or making the website mobile friendly. And in a few years they're going to be scrambling to address something they should have been working on for years. The company as a whole has been comfortably resting on their laurels and underestimating what it takes to stay on top in the digital age.


  6. "Strange workplace culture but good pay and benefits"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Marketing Research Associate in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Marketing Research Associate in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at McMaster-Carr full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Pays well, good benefits, profit sharing, no overworking of employees.

    Cons

    Not particularly employee centric, so people are easily shuffled around and let go.

    Advice to Management

    Empower employees more.


  7. "Good place to work, but don't expect to retire here."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Packer in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Packer in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at McMaster-Carr full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Good pay, profit sharing full tuition reimbursement, paid benefits

    Cons

    Too bad a few bad apples spoil what could be a wonderful place to work. Pays well but expectations are near perfection. If you can't keep that pace up as long as you're employed, then you will be canned no matter how many years you've worked your ass off.

    Advice to Management

    Find your bad apples and get rid of them. Too many good hardworking people are losing their jobs.

  8. Helpful (1)

    "Great Place To Work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Operations Manager in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Operations Manager in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at McMaster-Carr full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great benefits and great co-workers. You will never find a more competent group of people to work with and for.

    Cons

    Expectations are extremely high and it can be difficult to hit those goals each and every day. You are, however, compensated appropriately for those expectations.

    Advice to Management

    Listen to the employees more. They have the best ideas out of anyone in the building.


  9. "Interesting and challenging place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Supervisor in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Supervisor in Los Angeles, CA
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Great people, interesting projects, data driven

    Cons

    not the most exciting industry

    Advice to Management

    I think you are doing a good job!


  10. Helpful (1)

    "Perfect for some, but make sure you understand what your job will be!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Supervisor in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Supervisor in Los Angeles, CA
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Great pay and benefits. Good opportunities if you are employed with the intention of moving to management roles.
    Tuition reimbursement is a huge benefit that allows employees to gain a top-notch education while employed. I really respect the companies basic values and think it provides a respectful and professional work environment.

    Cons

    Unfortunately, I don't think they give most employees a real sense that they can advance within the company. Promotions from hourly to salaried positions are few and far between.

    Overall attitude seems to be that if employees are paid enough they will be happy. This isn't true, especially when young supervisors with little management experience are encouraged to "try new things" without always being held accountable by their own managers.

    Advice to Management

    Make sure your employees know what their opportunities are for career development when they are hired.


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