Minnesota Public Radio Reviews | Glassdoor

Minnesota Public Radio Reviews

Updated June 29, 2017
16 reviews

Filter

Filter

Full-timePart-time

3.7
StarStarStarStarStar
Rating TrendsRating Trends
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
(no image)
Glen D Nelson
1 Rating

16 Employee Reviews

Sort: PopularRatingDate

  1. "Great Company!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Minnesota Public Radio full-time

    Pros

    Flexible hours, great co workers

    Cons

    Senior level management seems out of touch


  2. "Employees are dedicated to the company but the company couldn't care less about employees"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    I have been working at Minnesota Public Radio full-time

    Pros

    Great coworkers, employees have a shared goal of being part of a nonprofit, employees care about their work, downtown location connected to coffee shops and places to eat.

    Cons

    Management doesn't respect employees. Employees are screamed at. They are lied to. Their jobs are threatened. Employees are often told they're lucky they even work there and not at Starbucks. Some managers hold grudges and stop talking to employees for long periods of time.

    Management wants employees to see the company as a big family. This is not reciprocated. The management has no attachment to employees and does not care what happens to people. Employees are treated like cogs.

    There is no long term memory when it comes to what people have contributed to the company. Everyday is like starting over and trying to prove yourself again and again.

    Advice to Management

    People work 50 to 60 hours almost every week. This is expected. It is not rewarded. Then employees are told they must write 40 hours a week on their timecards. They are told to falsify timecards.

  3. "Great place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Minnesota Public Radio full-time

    Pros

    Interesting people doing interesting work. Everybody had a sense of purpose and felt the work was very important for the community and nationwide.

    Cons

    No cons that are significant.


  4. "Graphic Production Artist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends

    I worked at Minnesota Public Radio full-time

    Pros

    I loved working for a nonprofit with a great mission. I got to learn a lot on the job.

    Cons

    I ended up leaving because the position was a dead end for me.


  5. "Great place for creative professionals"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Communications Manager in Saint Paul, MN
    Current Employee - Communications Manager in Saint Paul, MN
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Minnesota Public Radio full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    MPR is a magnet for smart, creative people who are interested in building community through radio. It's a mission-driven non-profit organization that offers pay and benefits that are competitive with the private sector.

    Cons

    Because it's a medium-sized company MPR is relatively "flat" -- it isn't always easy to find a clear career path within the company. A lot of people find they need to leave the company, get experience elsewhere in a field, then come back. And because many of the job postings are very specialized, there are relatively few entry-level opportunities.

    Advice to Management

    I'd encourage management to create more opportunities for entry-level employees to cross-train and build their resumes within the organization.


  6. "Identity Crisis"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Minnesota Public Radio full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    You get to work with really smart, creative people in an environment that fosters creativity and a sense of playfulness. MPR produces high-quality content.

    Cons

    MPR has a bit of an identity crisis. Leadership often refer to it as a "company," rather than an "organization," which can be frustrating to people whose job is to raise philanthropic funds. Leadership also talk frequently about the need to be agile in order to compete in the media landscape, but in reality, change at MPR comes slowly and with a good deal of bureaucracy, and some departments use outdated technology.

    Personally, I found it difficult to stretch at MPR. Lateral moves are challenging, and one must be willing to self-advocate a great deal. I was part of a leadership/mentor program that kind of went nowhere - lots of commitment to my career path that didn't really pan out. I also felt, as a POC, frustrated by a lack of diversity and cut-throat hiring practices. As a top organization, MPR often defaulted to hiring the best & brightest from outside, rather than cultivating (esp. POC) from within. There was a strong sense in the culture at MPR that people were easily replacable.

    Advice to Management

    Stick to your roots - MPR is a non-profit media organization. Focus - know who you serve and direct your resources there. Cultivate talent from within, and tap staffers outside of content for useful expertise. Be candid and personal with staff - being authentic and approachable requires really leveling with staff, not just loosening your tie.


  7. "Good Company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Nice people to work with.

    Cons

    I can't think of any.

  8. Helpful (3)

    "Grant Writer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Saint Paul, MN
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Saint Paul, MN
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    GREAT. COWORKERS. They keep many of us there despite all the cons below...

    Also: 100% employer retirement match up to 6.5%, fairly flexible work schedules and telework options for many departments (including most fundraising jobs), comp and discounted event tickets, and general access to stuff that's cool--the annual employee cabaret, cheap membership swag, and occasional run-ins with musicians or politicians in the lobby.

    Cons

    Above all, a warning: there's a good chance you will not love MPR as an employee as much as you might as a listener. Are you sure you want to see how the sausage gets made?

    Work environment: At its worst, HARSH; at its best, still INTENSE: high pressure, high stress, high expectations. Not a "benefit of the doubt" culture - lots of finger-pointing and a pervasive "I know how to do your job better than you do" attitude between different departments and professional disciplines. General unconscious arrogance pervades.

    Poor culture of philanthropy: Fundraisers and others from the NPO sector will cringe every time the CEO, a senior exec, or a colleague in content refers to MPR as "this company" rather than "this organization." MPR's aspirationally corporate attitude is just one symptom of the generally low understanding of/appreciation for philanthropy as an endeavor or profession among non-fundraisers at MPR (membership, of course, is understood; major giving, community partnerships, and institutional giving--not so much).

    Structure: This highly silo-ed, very hierarchical organization is going on 50 years--and really starting to show its age through lack of agility and slowness to adapt. Plus, MPR has SO MANY different departments and projects - lots of moving pieces, and one hand often (actually, more often than not) doesn't know what the other hand is doing. The environment of constant scramble and lack of focus could be the organization's greatest strategic weakness.

    Strategy and future: Everyone is anxious about the future of the media industry and radio as we know it (traditional revenue sources declining, audience time spent listening declining, increasing competition in the public media and for-profit media sectors, especially for podcasting and on-demand audio), but what's MPR's long-term vision and strategy? Leadership can't seem to answer with focus or consistency: are we doing this, or that? What about that other thing we said we cared about? Do we still? Senior leaders are sincere, good people--but risk-averse and dangerously SLOW to make decisions or act. Very hard to articulate to donors (or myself) a vision of where, exactly, MPR is going.

    Advice to Management

    Any way you measure it (audience size, budget, geographic scope)...

    MPR is not NPR.

    MPR is not CBS.

    So please stop expecting MPR to be seen that way by audiences or treated that way by funders and donors!

    What we ARE is MINNESOTA Public Radio. Our local strengths are our most competitive distinction and our best strategic hope for surviving the upheaval in the media industry right now. Stay focused on the local!


  9. "Director, APMG IT Infrastructure"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at Minnesota Public Radio full-time

    Pros

    Innovative and collaborative work place
    mission focused
    small enough to be noticed and rewarded

    Cons

    Certain jobs can be quite demanding due not always having the necessary resources as it is a non-profit.


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Great product, good people, challenged leadership"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Great, passionate people to work with. If you like public media and its role in society, this is one of the best and biggest out there.

    Cons

    Senior leadership is challenged to keep the train on the tracks. Need visionary-types we can lead large division and that isn't what is there now.


Showing 16 of 17 reviews
Reset Filters