Minute Clinic Reviews | Glassdoor

Minute Clinic Reviews

Updated December 6, 2017
178 reviews

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Pros
  • Flexible scheduling, great benefits, decent pay (in 18 reviews)

  • excellent entry level work, provides good opportunity to new grads (in 15 reviews)

Cons
  • Limited scope of practice for practice model (in 13 reviews)

  • You are a one man show you do everything limited scope of practice (in 10 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (3)

    "Friends Don’t Let Friends Work at MinuteClinic"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Family Nurse Practitioner in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Family Nurse Practitioner in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Minute Clinic full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    -60 minute (unpaid) lunch break (if you don’t get mauled by impatient customers on the way out)

    -Always an opportunity to pick up extra shifts (due to poor provider retention)

    -Leave work at work (except when you kvetch to your significant other every night)

    -Epic (expect a workflow to change every other week)

    -General low acuity (don’t expect to learn anything unless you’re in a high volume urban clinic or in a lower SES area)

    -Not a bad gig to get before going on maternity leave.

    -I have a very nice collaborating MD. While I have never met her in person (!) and only consulted with her several times, she is helpful and professional and I am glad she is there as a resource.

    Cons

    Unresolved wage disparity between new hires and existing employees:
    -For the past 6 months in MA, new hires are being brought in at approximately $60/hr, which is way above the starting rate of existing employees
    -The greatest confirmed wage disparity known is $52/hr (existing employee) and $63/hr (new hire for weekend coverage making $66/hr with $3 weekend differential)
    -6 months in and no resolution is yet in sight despite NPs voicing discontent for months on end.

    Loss of understanding of its own scope of practice:
    -Expansion of services to include chronic disease management (HTN, DMII, thyroid disease and asthma) which is entirely inappropriate for a walk-in clinic
    -Enormous pressure from corporate and management to offer these services because it means more $$$ because these visits need more follow up visits ($$$)
    -MC could expand services in the direction of Urgent Care (for example, we could have dermabond instead of peak flow meters!)
    -Sometimes, MC does not seem to know what it’s doing. Why would you begin offering diabetes-related services after asking us to return glucometers from the clinics?
    -Expectation to “refer to specialist” is in the practice guidelines. HOW? We have no referral management system.
    -A chief NP bigwig once stated “we are the largest primary care group in America”. No! Wrong, try again! We are the largest RETAIL and CONVENIENT CARE group in America! Good grief.

    Abuse of on call:
    -There are serial abusers of on call here as there are anywhere; however those serial abusers of on call are rarely held accountable for the inconvenience they cause other providers
    -Certain people seem to have chronic childcare issues and frequently leave early or call out without being held accountable for it
    -Even management abuses on call; they will sneakily try to activate you and send you out of your coverage area because of clinic closures secondary to poor provider retention
    -Management has suggested to providers scheduled on more weekends than they are obligated to work that they should use on-call to get a weekend off.

    Distant/absent management:
    -Many providers have worked under a manager for years and have only met the manager face-to-face for 15 minutes—but you will be contacted by this manager at any time of day or night when s/he needs you last minute to staff xyz clinic or to split your day between one clinic in the AM and another clinic half an hour plus away in the PM.

    Poor IT support:
    -I’ve spent 30-60 minutes on hold with IT while I have impatient entitled customers banging down the door or walking into the clinic not understanding that I cannot see them and fix a computer issue at the same time.
    -Also, everything breaks on a regular basis. The kiosk where the patients sign in breaks almost daily. The printer. The computer. The cabinet doors. The telephone. Instead of purchasing useless iPads for every clinic they could have invested a few hundred dollars in each of the clinics themselves.

    Evading promises and not honoring reasonable expectations with providers:
    -As an employee without a contract, I have a right to reduce my employment status from FT to PT at will and yet it is like pulling teeth to have this change on the next 6 week schedule.
    -MC creates a holiday schedule and then chooses not to follow it when those holidays come around, sneakily trying to schedule you unless you call them out on it.
    -MinuteClinic scheduling will not honor the number of weekends you are required to work (you may find yourself scheduled to work every other other weekend when you’re supposed to be scheduled every third weekend)

    High and rapid turnover rates:
    -There comes a time when get-togethers with MC friends turn into reminiscing over the 2283492374 wonderful colleagues you’ve had who have thrown in the towel and gone on to work at normal jobs.
    -Often people come and go and you have never heard their name
    -Want to call someone during the day? Lonely? Need to consult? Guess what—you may not know any of the names on the schedule today because they’re ALL NEW. Do you bother to get to know them? Maybe. They might be long gone in 6 months.

    Pressure to market the clinic:
    -“Make announcements over the intercom!”
    -“ROUND THE AISLES” — Honestly, I might as well have been wearing a ridiculous, oversized costume standing at a busy intersection waving at passing cars!
    -“Call back the parents of these 234234 children you did sports physicals for last year and tell them to come back again this year!” (Wait, shouldn’t they have seen the pediatrician for a WCC in the interim? Shouldn’t they be encouraged to see pedi and use that physical for their sports clearance? NOPE)
    -“Write letters to local universities! Local community institutions! Use your professional network to market the clinic!”

    Lack of new provider oversight:
    -There used to be a new hire mentoring program at MC. That was gotten rid of.
    -There used to a director of clinical quality at MC. That position was eliminated, which speaks volumes.
    -Chart reviews are basically written by NPs who won’t read your chart before cutting and pasting one of the 20 inane comments they have in an email to you. There is a distinct lack of mentorship and constructive criticism.
    -What does that mean? New NPs are left to their own devices, without resources to contact when they need help, and this means clinical errors are made. Boy, have I seen errors made.

    Unsafe work environment:
    -NO ESCAPE ROUTE — you are a sitting duck without a buffer between you and the public.
    -Anyone can bring a gun, a knife or a fist and you will be locked in the clinic with them. That’s right, the door to the clinic is locked. Your cries for help would go unanswered because no one would be able to open the door.
    -There are “panic button” lanyards. If you press the button (as I did by accident one day), you will receive a call from Rhode Island saying “Approximately 10 minutes ago we received a call from security stating the panic button was activated. We are calling to make sure you are okay.” Meanwhile, you may be on the floor unconscious and bleeding out because So-And-So didn’t pass their DOT physical or didn’t get a zpack.

    Disrespect from corporate and clientele:
    -You are not perceived to be a medical professional when you work at MinuteClinic.
    -To corporate, you are an employee number. You will be recognized by being given Values in Action points, which translate to a $5 CVS gift card. Your bag and coat may be checked at the door because you cannot be trusted, and then the lotion, mints, and comb the store associate finds in your bag will be from CVS because you used your employee discount. Did you steal them in between running strep tests?
    -To the public, you work retail. You will be treated like a retail employee. You will be yelled at daily and talked to rudely daily. Customers will act self entitled, hurt, aggressive and childish at nearly every opportunity. People don’t recognize your level of education or your knowledge. I have been referred to as “the attendant”, and the “person at MinuteClinic”. People will say “I have Grave’s disease, you may have not heard of that.” HONESTLY?
    -As a result of this, Super Store is the TV show that you will relate to most to in life.

    Masking marketing campaigns and clinical access as public health initiatives:
    -You cannot close a chart without documenting that you offered (to sell) a flu shot. It’s really disguised corporate greed at its finest.
    -If there’s a blizzard or a Nor’easter or a flood, you are expected to be at MC at 8 am TO ENSURE CLINIC ACCESS TO THE PUBLIC. Meanwhile the only other people on the road are on their way to work their shift at the hospital WHERE THEY ARE NEEDED FOR PATIENT CARE. Meanwhile your friends in primary care and specialty care are at home.

    What benefits?:
    -CME, PTO accrual rates, incentive bonus; they are always reducing amounts or taking something away. Most of your patients will have better insurance plans than you. By the way, you have to wait the full 90 days to have insurance from MinuteClinic. You will be reminded of that every time you run someone’s insurance.

    Success is a popularity contest; not a meritocracy:
    -Your colleagues who have dedicated their time to the team, who precept new hires and NP students, and who act as your clinical go-to will routinely get passed over for positions and honors.

    Offering new services without notifying or training providers:
    -One fine day we received an email telling us to order peak flow meters for the “asthma service.” WAIT THERE IS AN ASTHMA SERVICE?

    Billing and money:
    -People want care to be free; they don’t want to pay their copay. Have fun dealing with that.
    -They really don’t want to pay for their visit when they are irate that they didn’t get what they wanted.
    -People expect elective services like administrative/camp/sports physicals to be covered by their insurance and will put up a fight when you ask for payment
    -People want know how much a visit is going to cost. You will have a hard time explaining LOS to them.
    -You will run into this struggle daily even though price ranges for visits, notifications of self-pay services and the line “payment for services due at end of visit” are emphasized on the registration kiosk at a 5th grade reading level.

    No valuable productivity incentive:
    -If you see a horde of patients every day by yourself for a year at a high volume clinic, you might take home a bonus. Or, over a year’s time you could just pick up two-three shifts at a low-volume clinic in a town in the middle of the woods, paint your nails for 10 hours, and take home the same amount of money.

    Empty promises from management about supporting high volume clinics:
    -Management will tell you for months “we’ll get you an LPN!” Or “we’ll open this clinic down the road that’s been ready to open for years and that will make it easier for you” or “we’ll double staff this clinic!”. It will not happen. Do not ever volunteer or get stuck in a high volume clinic, it is a sweat shop. Meanwhile your friends out in the clinics in the suburbs will be reading People magazine, painting their nails or doing CME.

    PTO requests are seldom honored:
    -You’ll have better luck asking people to switch shifts with you. Hey, at least you’ll cash out a ton of money when you fly the coop!

    No support during a medical emergencies:
    -There have been a few times when I’ve had someone walk in the door and hit the floor. I’ve hit the medical emergency button (“MEDICAL EMERGENCY IN MINUTE CLINIC, EMERGENCIA MEDICA EN MINUTECLINIC” either interrupting the “CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE NEEDED IN REVLON” announcement or Gwen Stefani singing “Running” for the millionth time) and no one has come. Pharmacy staff probably can’t even hear the announcement they are so busy, and the store staff was no help. Well, great, my patient is on the floor.

    Middle Management and their favorites trash-talking providers on a conference call line:
    -Imagine dialing into a conference call on mute to join a “team huddle” to hear updates about work and instead you realize that you a) joined the “team huddle” on the wrong day and b) that your manager and their favorites are gossiping and saying awful things about you and your colleagues. Yes, that once happened to a colleague of mine.

    Regularly getting shorted on pay and having to wait 2 weeks to see that $600 that was missing from your last check:
    -Isn’t that illegal?
    -You will get into a habit of checking yesterday’s punches on your time card every shift as well as fine combing every paycheck to make sure you didn’t volunteer 10 hours of your life last Thursday.

    Inept, troublemaking “customer call center”:
    -The “Customer Call Center” at corporate headquarters is staffed by unlicensed employees who will give MinuteClinic customers all sorts of incorrect or misleading information about MinuteClinic. You will have to deal with this misinformation when the patient comes to your door. For example…
    Member of the Public: “Can I get HIV medication at MinuteClinic?”
    Call Center Rep: “Yes, we’re open until 7! You can also get a flu shot!”
    MinuteClinic NP when Member of the Public shows up at 6:54: “I cannot give you HIV medication at MinuteClinic not now and not ever. You need to call your PCP’s office. Now if you excuse me I need to go pee really badly, take out the trash and swiffer the floor.”
    -Call center tells people insurance covers physicals for work/school/camp
    -Call center tells people in the middle of meningitis outbreak that all clinics have doses of meningococcal serogroup B vaccine for everyone who presents when it is actually on a manufacturer back order
    -The call center will send all sorts of inappropriate patient requests to you as CRMs (customer relationship management messages), such as requests for “school tardy notes” and “sick notes” not related to clinic visits, patients asking for antibiotics after the end of a visit when it was determined antibiotics were not warranted, patients asking for post-dated watch and wait antibiotic scripts to be changed so they can get their antibiotics NOW, as well as patients requesting a “refill” of antibiotics before they get on a plane in an hour and a half from the time of their call. I’m not kidding.

    What, the computer is down AGAIN?
    You’ll be told to paper chart the rest of the day and enter them on your own time when the computer is fixed. Meanwhile if the urgent care down the street is having a computer systems outage, they will redirect their patients to you because MINUTECLINIC I$ ALWAY$ OPEN.

    In summary, why would you as a self respecting, highly educated nursing professional work at MInuteClinic? I would do some soul-searching, keep advancing your knowledge and call back those recruiters. You can stop by MC for a TB test when you get that new job and remind yourself of the bullet you dodged.

    Advice to Management

    It's time to shape up before the word gets out that you have created a hostile, toxic and poorly compensated work environment. When we voice concerns and complaints, we receive scripted responses and invalidation. If you value retaining highly educated, professional healthcare providers who have many job opportunities elsewhere, you need to begin to show it. MinuteClinic NPs are very active in their communities--we teach at local universities, have NP friends, precept students and are part of alumni networks. We don't have to recommend CVS/MinuteClinic as a place of employment.


  2. Helpful (3)

    "Unfair pay preactices"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Minute Clinic full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    I can honestly think of none

    Cons

    Pay has nothing to do with how many years you have as an NP or how long you have worked for the company. They hire new graduates without NP or even nursing experience for $8-10 dollars more than their most experienced NPs. It's disgusting

    Advice to Management

    Be more transparent about your hiring. Pay grades should be set up and those with more experience and loyalty (working and staying with the company) should be paid more than new graduates with no experience.

  3. Helpful (3)

    "I LO♥E MY JOB!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Current Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Minute Clinic full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Provide healthcare service within the community
    A valuable asset to those who are not sick enough to go to Urgent Care or ER
    Great extension of PCP office in case of acute illness and no appointments available at PCP
    Competitive salary and great benefits (educational reimbursement, CME, health, dental, vision, matching investment plan, Paid time off).

    Cons

    You work alone (I don't mind this)
    You are responsible for cleaning the clinic, stocking the clinic, minding the waiting room (I don't mind this either).
    You are expected to work some weekends and shifts do not end until 7:30 p.m. (Which I don't mind either).

    Advice to Management

    Have an experienced provider (or the manager) double at the busy clinics for 2 hours during the winter to help with supply orders, checking expiration dates, and clinic flow. Would help boost morale and keep providers from being stressed.


  4. Helpful (1)

    "Nice work life balance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - FNP
    Current Employee - FNP
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Minute Clinic full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Working 30 hours gets you full time benefits. Low acuity patients. Very good continuing education opportunities like call in grand rounds and lots of online resources.

    Cons

    Fairly limited scope of practice but has been expanding at a good pace. Pretty corporate .... you keep track of daily numbers. Alone in the clinic.


  5. Helpful (4)

    "NP"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner in Tampa, FL
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner in Tampa, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Minute Clinic full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    If you like to eat candy it's convenient

    Cons

    You work in a small room by yourself with no window and you register patients, take they money and do the insurance, do all the administrative work, see the patient, also do marketing, and deal with an ineffective management that is only worried about how many patients you have seen. They put peepholes in the door so safety is a concern because patients can become violent if they don't get what they want or if they can't be seen. They have terrible benefits and CEM is laughable, but the CEO just gave himself a 9 million dollar bonus. They promote that they are pro NP but that is far from the truth. They are Pro corporation not patient. The turnover is 30-40 percent for np's. They may pay a few dollars more but the loss in CEM, bonus, benefits, and your sanity puts this job way below the others. Take pride in your profession and stay clear.

    Advice to Management

    Stop drinking the cool-aide


  6. Helpful (5)

    "No work life balance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Minute Clinic full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    *They hire new grads. Once new grads realize what this job all entails and they get their experience in they quit-usually after a few months.
    *Salary is quite competitive but if you value work life balance the salary won’t matter because there is no balance.

    Cons

    *Working every other weekend is very difficult for people with families.
    *The hours are very long. It states the clinic is open until 7:30pm but you will almost always be there past 7:30pm especially for clinics that are very busy.
    *You are required to be on call.
    *High turn over.
    *Always short staffed.
    *You will get bombarded with text messages, phone calls, and emails to ask you to cover shifts when the clinics are short staffed.
    *The practitioner has to register the patient, this means get their insurance card and have general knowledge in regards to insurances, take cash or credit card payments, order all supplies for the clinic including vaccines and POCT testing, clean the exam rooms, perform all the QC testing, check fire extinguishers near the clinic, perform a fire drill with store personnel, and many many more tasks.
    *The company is always expanding their services and you are required to learn new systems with minimal help. You must perform DOT exams, wellness exams (similar to the exams required by Medicare), urine and hair drug testing, some chronic care, travel health, STD checks are just a few of the visit types. This is much more than a retail walk in clinic. You might as well work at a family practice clinic.
    *PTO is accumulated at such a ridiculously low rate.
    *It is very difficult to get time off approved. Don’t even think about asking off around the holidays.
    *Most all holidays clinics are open so be prepared to work a few holidays a year.
    *Management is never accessible. You really are all on your own.


  7. Helpful (3)

    "Not Worth the Pay"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Former Employee - Nurse Practitioner
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at Minute Clinic full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Good Pay, nothing else is good

    Cons

    Work alone, busy clinic with no help, patients demand antibiotics for colds, no time to complete call backs and administrative duties with 30 patients per day, computer gives you 18 minutes per patient regardless how much time it really takes you, no break room, no one else in the store has a medical back ground and will not assist during emergencies, you will never see management or your educator, minimal orientation, you are essentially ripping people off when they present with a condition you can not treat as they expect you to evaluate and refer still collecting the copay or $100+ cash payment

    Advice to Management

    Be present

  8. "Apn"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Apn in Monmouth Heights at Manalapan, NJ
    Former Employee - Apn in Monmouth Heights at Manalapan, NJ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Minute Clinic full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Fast service and great practitioners

    Cons

    Limited when it comes to management

    Advice to Management

    None


  9. Helpful (3)

    "Meh"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Physician Assistant
    Current Employee - Physician Assistant
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Minute Clinic full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Schedule flexibility & low acuity patients (which will change soon with the addition of chronic care services)

    Cons

    Pay! Pay! Pay! You have about 8 jobs- medical assistant, marketing, NP/PA, insurance billing & coding, clinic manager, customer service rep, janitor, etc etc. You're paid half the salary of one. The company continually pushes an increasing number of primary care services (while still pushing urgent care services as well), but aren't pushing increased salaries. The workload has become unbearable while being paid peanuts.

    Advice to Management

    Treat your providers like providers & not marketing tools.


  10. Helpful (3)

    "FNP"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Minute Clinic full-time

    Pros

    Decent pay.
    Shift work
    Easy diagnoses

    Cons

    Full time is 30 hours ...but you have to work every other weekend and 5 hour shifts.
    You are the janitor, receptionist, billing person, marketer, nurse, and nurse practitioner for every patient. Must do all of this within 20 mins of seeing a patient.
    Guidelines for everything - must follow these protocols.
    Constantly adding more work to your plate.
    Bonus based on customer satisfaction - NOT how hard you work. (We all know who really fills out customer surveys - disgruntled patients)
    Horrible medical insurance.


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