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NPR Employee Reviews about "entry level"

Updated Sep 23, 2019

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Found 7 of over 310 reviews

4.2
83%
Recommend to a Friend
86%
Approve of CEO
NPR President and CEO Jarl Mohn
Jarl Mohn
80 Ratings
Pros
  • "Tiny Desk Concerts / free books(in 33 reviews)

  • "Also the tiny desk concerts are great(in 27 reviews)

  • Cons
  • "npr's(in 8 reviews)

  • "Entry-level employees often must prove themselves by working temporary assignments before they're hired full-time(in 7 reviews)

  • More Pros and Cons
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    works at 

    Deloitte

    When I drop my car off at the mechanic I change my radio from NPR to another station so that they don't know I listen to NPR.

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    Ratings by Demographics

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    Reviews about "entry level"

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    1. 5.0
      Former Employee

      Excellent people and opportunities, can feel like a bubble

      Sep 10, 2018 - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Plenty of chances to hone pitching, booking and audio editing skills. Competitive pay and benefits and pleasant office environment. Overall, the hosts and behind-the-scenes staff are friendly and easy to work with and there's a feeling of comradery in the newsroom.

      Cons

      Can feel closed-minded as most people come from similar backgrounds and share similar interests and political views. Entry-level employees often must prove themselves by working temporary assignments before they're hired full-time.

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      1 person found this review helpful
    2. 4.0
      Former Employee, less than 1 year

      Good summer internship

      Sep 23, 2019 - Intern 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Engaging, exciting, collaborative work environment

      Cons

      Not the best treatment of entry-level temporary employees

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    3. 4.0
      Former Intern, less than 1 year

      Washington Desk Intern

      Feb 8, 2016 - Intern in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      The summer internship session was by far the best internship experience I've had in college, and it was my fourth. NPR's work culture is extremely enhancing and positive, and interns are treated just like entry-level staff members. You assist the higher-ups and are encouraged to pitch and create your own content (spent several days on the Hill and in the WH doing my own research/news gathering). There are weekly "Brown-bag lunch" session where faculty members train you in courses to help with enhancing your resume for future job opportunities. Also, Soundbite cafe is the bomb. Try all the soups.

      Cons

      The internship is competitive and recent grads are encouraged to apply, but there is no promise of entry-level job placement, which can be very disappointing. NPR's entry-level opportunities come in the form of temporary employment. Temp assignments are rare and hard to come by, but if you make your connections throughout the 8 weeks, you can get lucky. Some people were turned off by the low pay; its essentially minimum wage. Everyone gets the same amount no matter how many hours they work per week.

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    4. 4.0
      Current Employee, more than 1 year

      Loved working here -- but there are some deep structural issues that need attention

      Jun 19, 2015 - Fellow and Temp Producer in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Smart, kind -- if often awkward -- people make this a fantastic place to work. Some of the sharpest, most creative people I've had the pleasure of knowing work here. I found people to be very willing to work collaboratively, and focused primarily on producing great radio. It's fast-paced but great. I worked in shows, on the digital desk and for the national desk. Work-life balance is surprisingly good for a 24/7 media company. I learned so much from working with the people here. Add to that the company has a strong union, so pay is pretty good, benefits are fantastic, lots of time off, and the company has built in a lot of amenities into the new building incl. gym, bike storage, showers, nurse, cafeteria, etc.

      Cons

      Lots of reviews on here have focused on top management turnover -- obviously NPR could benefit from a leader at the top who creates stability and can grow the company. Layoffs and buyouts are a buzz kill, and the churn means that projects aren't always consistently followed through. But the bigger problem, from my perspective, is at the bottom of the pile -- and that's where I hope Jarl Mohn, the new CEO, will focus some of his attention. 1) When I was there some 20 percent of news staffers were temps. Temps have a pretty sweet deal -- union-level pay and qualify for benefits after a few months. Sweet, except for the instability. 2) Because of the over-reliance on temps, there are no actual entry-level jobs at NPR. If you want to be a producer (which is the biggest category of newsroom staffers, both digital and radio) or an editor, the best way to do that is to start as an intern, temp for months or (more often) years, and then apply for a bottom-level Production Assistant job. PAs used to be entry-level, but they definitely aren't. 3) Because the intern pool is where eventual employees seem to always come from, robust diversity is important. While there is some focus on diversity at the company, it is largely skin deep. That's important, but it means they often miss a chance to focus on diversity of background, experience, geography, schooling, etc. So having entire intern classes that are largely from elite, northeast private liberal arts colleges (though often diverse in race/ethnicity/gender) means that your de facto recruitment strategy gets a lot of people who often share very similar perspectives. 4) It is nearly impossible to come in from the outside if you're a producer or editor. Most of those jobs are open only internally. 5) It is nearly impossible to become a reporter from the inside. If you want to report, but you're a producer or editor, you have to leave the company. 6) There are very few clear career ladders at NPR. Mentoring is totally ad-hoc. If you're particularly good at schmoozing management and can push your way into doing what you want, that's great. More than just being a self-starter, it's a particular style of networking that gets you to the place you want. I think the company would retain more highly talented young people who are less interested in playing office politics than they are in doing excellent work if they created clear career ladders and better mentoring. Also, they'd end up with fewer people in management who are more interested in playing office politics in management positions than in doing creative, exciting work. 7) There is a serious amount of disrespect between digital and radio -- it needs to be mended to create more dynamic content. 8) There is very little respect for or understanding of member stations on NPR's editorial side. (To be fair, there's a lot of angst for the network on the member station side.) Bridging the two should be a top priority for the network so that it can rely on member stations as a farm team that can produce highly qualified candidates.

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      16 people found this review helpful
    5. 4.0
      Current Contractor

      Rigorous but supportive work environment. Moving up through bureaucracy takes tactical strategy.

      Mar 17, 2013 - Anonymous Contractor 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Sense of teamwork in various departments. High quality journalism, Intellectual intrigue. Free books and access to Tiny Desk concerts. Being likable as a person is important.

      Cons

      Hiring freeze. Very few entry level jobs except temporary assignments which can be unpredictable and are in a gray area in terms of rights protection.

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    6. 4.0
      Former Intern, less than 1 year

      NPR Intern Experience

      May 8, 2014 - Anonymous Intern in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      For the most part, I wasn't treated like an intern, but rather, like a ember of staff. I learned so much and grew.

      Cons

      The internship is competitive and recent grads are encouraged to apply, but there is no promise of entry-level job placement, which can be very disappointing. NPR's entry-level opportunities come in the form of temporary employment. Temp assignments are rare and hard to come by.

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    7. 5.0
      Former Employee

      Amazing Internship Experience

      May 7, 2011 - Intern 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Close, tight-knit community; plenty of events/celebrations to keep things interesting, recognizable brand name, great location (DC's Chinatown); friendly, helpful staff; very relaxed work environment

      Cons

      Not too many cons, there has been a lot of shift among senior leadership within NPR, so I think that the organization is still trying to recover. For entry-level jobseekers, there is not a lot of potential for promotion/temp work, etc.

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