NYC Teaching Fellows Reviews | Glassdoor

NYC Teaching Fellows Reviews

Updated October 27, 2018
48 reviews

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1.9
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NYC Teaching Fellows Principal Anthony Finney
Anthony Finney
6 Ratings

48 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • "subsidized masters education (positive initiative)" (in 4 reviews)

  • "Free Masters degree (or highly subsidized)" (in 3 reviews)

Cons
  • "Hi stress because of teaching and grad school workloads combined" (in 5 reviews)

  • "Ultimately, if you can afford to go to graduate school and work part/full time in another capacity, you will have a much better outcome" (in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Teaching Fellow"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    Free Master's Degree and Great Students

    Cons

    Low Pay and High Turnover


  2. "Great opportunity -Pathway to Teaching Career"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - NYC Teaching Fellow
    Former Employee - NYC Teaching Fellow
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Can start working at a teacher from the start, don't have to wait to finish Education Masters

    Cons

    Hi stress because of teaching and grad school workloads combined

  3. "NYC Teaching Fellow"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    -it's a quick route to teaching in the NYC public school system.
    -your masters in Education gets subsidized heavily.
    -you meet a lot of great people who are passionate about the field.

    Cons

    -long days
    -low stipend
    -constant pressure during the training period


  4. Helpful (2)

    "Awful."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    The children.

    Cohort friendships, support and networking.

    Cons

    Very poorly managed program.
    Grad school classes are not very relevant or helpful.
    Coaches, Lead instructors can be absolutely fake and horrible. The way they treat some fellows is just sad and pathetic. Sure, they are well educated and have lots of experience but they have no idea how to be a decent human being.
    No support, you have to figure out a lot on your own. It helps if you have at least some experience before you get yourself into this because there will be little to no support.

    Advice to Management

    Revamp this program. It makes no sense to teach fellows about empathy and respect all day, yet the staff won't lead by example.

    Many fellows will probably agree that it is the staff (coaches, TADs and Lead instructors) who make this program much more frustrating than it needs to be. Therefore, train them to act like coaches and not bullies.


  5. Helpful (2)

    "Not worth the stress"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    Nothing at all. Cohort relationships that is about it.

    Cons

    Long days
    sleepless nights
    little pay
    lack of preparation
    pointless extra work
    terrible coaches who constantly complain about not wanting to be a coach
    placed in the worst schools possible, no support


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Even if you're desperate, don't do this to yourself."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    The amazing kids you get to work with. Some of the children you work with know more about respect than many of the coaches and other adults.

    You get to meet a few great people.

    Cons

    Very disorganized.
    Biased coaches, lots of favoritism and disrespectful people.
    You won't get much help from anyone even if you ask and show that you care. In fact, everything that you say will go against you.
    They make assumptions about you and look for excuses to give you low ratings if they don't like you for some reason.

    Advice to Management

    Coaches need to be trained. Some of them clearly don't know what they are doing and make assumptions, "forget" to tell fellows important information and don't give helpful feedback at all.

    The coaches should spend more time training or helping fellows instead of idly standing around, engaging in gossip and being disrespectful.

    Every classroom and student is different. Behavioral techniques taught in SBS won't work in every classroom. Behavior techniques need to be flexible especially when SBS ones aren't working for some students.


  7. Helpful (1)

    "This Organization Commits Some Acts That Are Likely Illegal"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Teacher in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Teacher in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    The mission is great. It is unfortunate that they don't accomplish that mission.

    Cons

    The organization overhires people in order to ensure that all positions are filled. In the event that there not attrition to reduce the number of applicants by summer's end, they get rid of some of their qualified fellows, who by then have invested time, money, and energy into the program. The org should be shut down by its funders.

  8. "Nyc teaching fellows"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Feee tuition solid pay

    Cons

    Long hours, PST hard


  9. "Don't do it."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    You get a subsidized master's degree, but you still have to pay for some of it.
    You get a teaching job simultaneity while getting your master's.

    Cons

    For me, I was NOT provided with a curriculum or books. I was expected to get my students to pass the regents exams they failed. They were ESL students, and I had NO knowledge of which exams they failed. How are we supposed to teach these students when given impossible scenarios? Not ok! PROVIDE TEACHERS WITH CURRICULUM AND BOOKS. GOD IT'S NOT THAT HARD.

    Advice to Management

    Get your crap together.


  10. "My thoughts"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    - get paid full-time salary while getting your certification and masters degree
    - develop and network with other people in the program
    - get some guidance and additional support towards becoming a first year teacher

    Cons

    - extremely demanding
    - irrelevant grad classes and lessons
    - you don't get to choose the grad school
    - you may have to pay out of pocket for additional grad-school classes
    - a possibility of expulsion if strict guidelines are not followed
    - poorly organized structure
    - masters degree is not fully paid for; you still have to pay around $10,000


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