NYC Teaching Fellows Reviews | Glassdoor

NYC Teaching Fellows Reviews

Updated August 17, 2017
27 reviews

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NYC Teaching Fellows Principal Anthony Finney
Anthony Finney
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27 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Teaching Fellows"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Masters Degree while working
    Get to meet other teachers in NYC and because the program is so intense you become close very quickly

    Cons

    Summer is very difficult. Make sure you know you would be really great at it before you quit your job and take the leap.

    Advice to Management

    Some fellows work really hard and might need additional time to learn how to be the best teacher you want them to be. Make time for those fellows to continue learning and being in the program. The summer can be really difficult and hard to learn all of the skills.


  2. Helpful (1)

    "Classroom Teacher"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    -Connections to a diverse network of educators.
    -Subsidized tuition for a 2 years Masters Program.
    -The opportunity to work while you gain your certification.

    Cons

    -The uncertainty of the program's scope and sequence.
    -Having a family which means the possibility of unexpected emergencies can get kicked out of the program because their 2 absence policy for coursework.
    -Balancing a very demanding workload from your university and a New Profession with many unforeseen challenges.

    Advice to Management

    - Change the absence policy.
    - Eliminate the Edtpa. ($300 for a Template to apply)
    - Stop punishing people who are willing to work themselves to exhaustion with a sea of testing fees through Pearson

  3. Helpful (2)

    "Unethical and Irresponsible"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    None that I can think of.

    Cons

    The program is unethical since it requires candidates to quit their jobs and doesn't inform fellows that they may fail the summer training and be eliminated from the program.
    The summer training is an unfair judgement of fellows' teaching abilities. It's not a training since fellows are expected to perform perfectly since the beginning. The coaches are not there to coach but to put people down.
    Even there is a significant improvement shown by a fellow's teaching abilities, and the fellow meets the expectations at the end of the training, the fellow will still be considered 'does not meet expectations' and being dropped from the program.
    Teaching Fellows NEVER shows the exact scores and yet send a 'Do Not Meet Expectations' email to a fellow.
    There are definitely racism and discrimination going on in the summer training.

    Advice to Management

    Be ethical and responsible by informing candidates about the unrealistic summer training before asking people to quit their jobs.


  4. Helpful (1)

    "Truly awful"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    There are no pros, unfortunately.

    Cons

    -10 hour days (not including lesson planning and preparation) with 4-5 hours of sleep per night for absurdly small compensation ($2500 for two months, which can hardly cover rent in NYC).
    -Harsh and negative criticism from coaches who penalize you for not meeting expectations or following directions when directions aren't clearly given - be prepared to figure things out on your own.
    -Very messy, disorganized management who doesn't keep track of Fellows and what directions they give. They have misdirected students to the wrong classroom, resulting in no teaching for that day (true story); coaches have not showed up to a training practice or simply "forgot". Coaches have emailed to ask you to change a lesson plan a few hours before teaching when you spent over three days preparing the lesson, and the coach had an entire week to give revisions (but waited until the last minute to tell you)
    -Paying over $500 for certification exams, which they don't tell you when you apply
    -Absurd, unrealistic attendance policy - getting kicked out of the program for being absent twice, no exceptions (even if you are in the hospital, a car accident, court appearance, experience severe illness, death in family, need to care for children)
    -Unrealistic expectations in teacher performance, NYCTF teaching methods are described as "militaristic"
    -During trainings, constantly getting treated as children (getting candy thrown at you, being told "pencils down"), getting insulted and talked down to constantly
    -Biased, rude, perhaps jaded coaches who give unfair, highly subjective ratings which are clearly influenced by personal opinions and favoritism. Your entire rating is based on about 3 minutes of teaching, which may or may not reflect your teaching ability or entire lesson. For whatever reason, if you mess that up (sudden misbehavior by students, PowerPoint stops working), you can be given an abysmal rating. This rating determines if you stay in the program or not. The coaches clearly have favorites, and it's impossible to talk to your coach fairly - if you don't stay on their good side, they may give you a poor rating next time.
    -Almost all NYCTF "support" is through emails and online training guides. There is virtually no one to personally advise you, give you direct support, or guide you through finding a job.
    -The PST structure is designed as a "boot-camp" - survival of the fittest. Due to the bias, subjectivity, and unorganized nature of the program, whether you stay in the program or not is not dependent on you. Be prepared to receive an email 3 days before the end of training telling you that you've been kicked out, for an unclear reason.
    -Classes at partner universities are a joke; even professors treat them as such.
    -Be prepared to be looked down upon if you are not a person of color.


  5. Helpful (2)

    "Be Careful"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Comp & Benefits
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    - Free Masters degree (or highly subsidized)
    - Chance to work at the Department of Education
    - Work with fun kids

    Cons

    I would be careful of this program if you are not 100% completely financially stable and/or do not have a job (other than in the DOE) lined up for after completing the program. While its goals are laudable and receiving a subsidized masters degree is nice, ultimately it is a crap shoot where you will be placed for Pre-Service Training. They pay $2500, roughly, for the summer; they can (and will) kick you out of the program for any reason ranging from the Coach just not liking you to whatever other reasons they may come up with.

    For those Fellows who it works out for, great. For others, some may not be so lucky and will be at the mercy of their Training Site, Coach, Co-Teacher, etc. There are so many factors that can combine for a total mess, depending on your luck. New York City Teaching Fellows places you in a school over the summer and if you survive and your coach likes you enough to pass you, great. For most people this will be the case. Otherwise, you will be kicked out (their statistics apparently are that 25% of Fellows are kicked out every year, which seems a high number to me). If you have the money to take the risk then great, otherwise seriously think about whether you want to get involved.


  6. Helpful (3)

    "Disappointment"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Fellow in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Fellow in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    It's always a great feeling to have kids and give back to the community.

    Cons

    Horrible management... it has a great mission and it should be a great purpose however if it's not run effectively it doesn't help anyone


  7. Helpful (12)

    "I would give this zero stars if i could"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Special Education Teacher
    Current Employee - Special Education Teacher
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    - foot in the door of the oldest and one of the most arcane and bureaucratic school systems in the US
    -subsidized masters

    Cons

    - don't fool yourself - even if you've got the diploma nothing in experience makes the masters program feels like a real masters
    - next to no support (think benign neglect) and in some cases, forces outright undermining your success as a teacher.

    Advice to Management

    get this program in shape or shut it down.

    to prospective and current candidates: for the love of god, don't do this if you're a rational human being who is sane or who likes themself.

    this program in no way prepares you for teaching, and you'll probably have to unlearn some of the bad habits and information you're taught during the summer intensive. teach like a champion? more like teach like a robot. the masters program is an absolute joke and you're more likely to find sensible people who go through the traditional route to certification - people who didn't have the ego to think they could learn everything to know about teaching in two years or who are carefully vetted enough to get into a school of education.* also, the program intentionally hides the number of certification exams, workshops, courses, miscellanea that you need to do in order to actually get certified.** the path to certification is not as easy as advertised and you do not need that stress. paying for all this will cost upwards of $1,000 in one of the most expensive cities in the world and you DO NOT NEED THAT STRESS. truly, YOU DO NOT NEED IT.

    it's ironic that you will find so little support in a program that purports to train caring, intelligent individuals to be teachers. the fellows program essentially leaves you the wolves, your university, and the Dept. of Ed (DOE). the DOE, your employer, is a crapshoot, as is any one school within the doe. you do not get support in finding a school placement. there are a lot of politics involved. you could find a job at an amazing school. but you will most likely find a job at a struggling school. you will meet absolutely amazing people who inspire you to do your best. you will also meet people who will make you question the future of humanity. sometimes they exist in the same building. sadly, that means there's probably drama in the building.

    think about this program, really think about it before you decide to apply/accept/whatever. think about what kind of people are drawn to a program that plays on people's hero complexes, think about the "schools" of education that are willing to partner with an organization that offers emergency certification, think about the kind of public schools that are willing to accept idealistic new teachers who are willing to work in hard conditions to get established. I, too, was once a bright-eyed, bushy-tailed innocent, eager to "make a difference." Now, I don't even know what that making a difference means anymore. Unless you really are one of those amazing saints who is amazingly organized and hardworking, and who cares about the children (especially the kids in inner city areas who need good teachers) but have really good reasons for not going a traditional route for certification, then go for it. If you didn't get accepted to the program, don't take it as a reliable judgment of your character or suitability as a teacher. there are better ways to becoming a teacher out there.

    *to be fair, there are also some traditional schools of ed that are terrible and some people who go through them that shouldn't be teachers. and there are some really good people in the program. but the program, as a whole, still sucks. and we all suffer. all. of. us.

    **also, don't fall for those sappy posters in the subway cars. it's misleading.

    i don't even care if this gets flagged, i regret doing this program so much that i want to shout it from the rooftops. 0/10 would not do again.

  8. Helpful (1)

    "Size of Tuition Subsidy"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Subsidized master's. For me the subsidy totals $8,760 -- Brooklyn College tuition is $5,065*4 = $20,260 for the two-year degree; my share $11,500.

    Cons

    Program is ineffective and inefficient.


  9. Helpful (2)

    "Teaching fellow"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Teacher in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Teacher in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good salary , paid master degree, full benefits and free health insurance. It's is a golden opportunity if you got selected for this program

    Cons

    They send you to low income communities school where they need you. Sometimes it's hard to do full time job SMS to do master simultaneously . Too much work


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Not for ESL"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - ESL Teacher in New York, NY
    Former Employee - ESL Teacher in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows (More than a year)

    Pros

    Cheap Masters options from an okay school

    Cons

    Literally everything else. The schools I worked at didn't follow the law when it came to ESL scheduling, had no ESL materials and literally no ESL curriculum in any way shape or form. I had to make everything from nothing while attending Grad school full time. Horrible experience that made me hate my life for two years.


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