NYC Teaching Fellows Reviews | Glassdoor

NYC Teaching Fellows Reviews

Updated August 13, 2018
42 reviews

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NYC Teaching Fellows Principal Anthony Finney
Anthony Finney
4 Ratings

42 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Teaching Fellow"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    Free Master's Degree and Great Students

    Cons

    Low Pay and High Turnover


  2. "Nyc teaching fellows"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Feee tuition solid pay

    Cons

    Long hours, PST hard

  3. "Don't do it."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    You get a subsidized master's degree, but you still have to pay for some of it.
    You get a teaching job simultaneity while getting your master's.

    Cons

    For me, I was NOT provided with a curriculum or books. I was expected to get my students to pass the regents exams they failed. They were ESL students, and I had NO knowledge of which exams they failed. How are we supposed to teach these students when given impossible scenarios? Not ok! PROVIDE TEACHERS WITH CURRICULUM AND BOOKS. GOD IT'S NOT THAT HARD.

    Advice to Management

    Get your crap together.


  4. "My thoughts"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    - get paid full-time salary while getting your certification and masters degree
    - develop and network with other people in the program
    - get some guidance and additional support towards becoming a first year teacher

    Cons

    - extremely demanding
    - irrelevant grad classes and lessons
    - you don't get to choose the grad school
    - you may have to pay out of pocket for additional grad-school classes
    - a possibility of expulsion if strict guidelines are not followed
    - poorly organized structure
    - masters degree is not fully paid for; you still have to pay around $10,000


  5. "Teacher"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Special Education Teacher in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Special Education Teacher in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    It gets you into the teaching profession.

    Cons

    It's supposed to train you for high risk schools but all the training is focused on charter schools. They don't train you to teach for urban settings and urban cultures.

    Advice to Management

    Teach behavior modification.


  6. "DOE entry point, but beware"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Staff Member in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Staff Member in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Mission is to help highly qualified teachers enter the public-school sector to improve education for all.

    Increased focus on equity.

    Training gives a solid foundation that can help new teachers.

    Entry point to DOE for a fraction of the cost of traditional routes.

    Cons

    Unclear goals for each training site. Understaffed and underfunded.

    Focus on ratings and strict cutoffs, but close to no training for coaches. Some have no training at all.

    Too many supports expected from too few staff.

    No time for team building.

    Advice to Management

    Increase funding. Hire more people. Clarify roles and expectations, and make sure you’re paying staff enough to meet those expectations.


  7. Helpful (1)

    "Not a well run program"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Teaching Fellow in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Teaching Fellow in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Good intentions. Nice attention to cultural needs of students.

    Cons

    They treat grown adults like the children. Lots of pointless work, most of which has no practical use. Paychecks are always late. Little to no transparency. They always hold back information until the last minute. SBS not geared toward specific strategies needed to engage your area.

    Advice to Management

    Quit treating LIs and Fellows like kids!

  8. "Worth IT"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    Master's Degree is subsidized and you are able to work while earning your degree and pursuing state licensure.

    Cons

    Long hours, extremely intense structure, and hard to get direct information.


  9. Helpful (6)

    "Teaching Fellow"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    You can learn a lot if you apply yourself, go in with an open mind, and desire to work in a NYC school that likely is underserved. Since my fellowship, I have had experience subbing in independent and private schools, and I have found that many of the techniques (especially with respect to behavior management) are really helpful in the classroom, and in fact, you may emerge having a better idea of how to engage students than those who do other paths to teaching. You also join a cohort of educators, and it is wonderful to develop a supportive peer network (and trust me, you will need it!) I learned an immense amount from the Head Instructor who taught us the NYC fellows curriculum in the summer.

    Cons

    There are MANY cons to the program, unfortunately. If you really want to develop as a teacher, you won't be able to do so reflectively, applying your masters' degree coursework in the classroom. You are just trying to stay alive. Being a first year teacher is challenging enough as it is, but to try to do so while taking graduate courses is extremely taxing. Also, the schools that hire fellows are often very, very limited in funds, can be hostile work environments, lacking in administrative support, etc. Many of us are drawn to the program because we truly desire to help make education in the city more equitable, but in my experience, the obstacles present at the hiring schools can be insurmountable. I think there ARE many teachers who emerge from the program with a job at a school that they love, so be smart as you do your job search. Other cons: you don't get to pick the area in which you receive your certification, because the selection process is based upon school need. Also, the pre-service training (which is the summer school intensive training) does not necessarily prepare you for your classroom in the fall. For instance, all of the literacy lesson planning you learn through the Fellows curriculum is actually quite good. However, if you are doing elementary education, or high-school science, it is essentially useless. Therefore, you start your job in the fall without any practical /applicable experience, and can't know how much you like it and/or how well you will do. Also, there is often lack of coordination between the DOE and your graduate school from an administration standpoint, so at times you have to "jump through hoops" to get some of the backend work completely as far as your certification requirements are concerned. Ultimately, if you can afford to go to graduate school and work part/full time in another capacity, you will have a much better outcome.

    Advice to Management

    More preparation, more thorough screening process to ensure good fit of teachers with specialties, more transparency with respect to job outlook and job expectations.


  10. Helpful (5)

    "Looking for a stable job opportunity? This is not it!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Special Education Teacher
    Current Employee - Special Education Teacher

    I have been working at NYC Teaching Fellows full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    After pre-service training you are paid as a full-time teacher while you earn your Master's degree and work on your certification.

    With the exception of $8,000 which you must pay, DOE pays for your Master's degree.

    Cons

    1) Due to heavy politics, position is not stable; if you have a job already don't quit to become a fellow, because acceptance into the program is no guarantee that you will be allowed to finish; and then you will be stuck with no job.
    2) First three months ~$800 month stipend only.
    3) If you don't live at home with your mother, you'll need a second job to survive 1st 3 months; caveat is - it is almost impossible to work a 2nd job based on the volume of work.
    4) Because the environment is very political, be prepared to compromise your integrity or lose your job.
    5) Even if you meet all of the academic requirements, pass all State exams and get all "A"s in the Master's program, if you are not willing to go along with questionable policies, just to get along, its difficult to move forward.
    6) If you are from out of town - Fellows offers no housing support, and its difficult to find decent housing in New York.

    Advice to Management

    There are some schools in the DOE that are operated by less than professional administrations. The teaching fellows should work hard to identify those schools, and alert fellows to steer clear of them.

    Be up front and honest about the pros and cons of the program.

    Develop a housing program for out of town people.

    Increase the stipend.


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