Cover image for NYC Teaching Fellows
Logo

NYC Teaching Fellows

Is this your company?

NYC Teaching Fellows

Add a Review

NYC Teaching Fellows Employee Reviews about "nyc"

Updated Sep 27, 2018

Verify your email to use filters. Having problems? Resend email
Found 76 of over 76 reviews
2.3
27% Recommend to a Friend
NYC Teaching Fellows Principal  Anthony Finney
29% Approve of CEO

Found 2 of over 76 reviews

2.3
27%
Recommend to a Friend
29%
Approve of CEO
NYC Teaching Fellows Principal  Anthony Finney
Anthony Finney
12 Ratings

The latest conversations about Teachers

Join the conversation on

Teachers

1y

a 

West Virginia Elementary School Teacher

Who is taking the COVID-19 Shot? Do you think all teachers should?

2,937

976 Comments

Teachers

200.2K Members 

Ask candid career questions

-1 - https://www.fishbowlapp.com/bowl/teachers/posts?cf=gd&utm_medium=Glassdoor&utm_source=glassdoor.com&utm_campaign=Reviews&utm_content=Industry-content-prominent-Reviews&utm_term=NYC Teaching Fellows~401211
Join the conversation on

Top Review Highlights by Sentiment

Pros
  • "Meeting awesome people who are driven to become successful teachers(in 3 reviews)
Cons
Pros & Cons are excerpts from user reviews. They are not authored by Glassdoor.

Reviews about "nyc"

Return to all Reviews
  1. 4.0
    Current Employee

    NYC Teaching Fellow

    Sep 27, 2018 - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    -it's a quick route to teaching in the NYC public school system. -your masters in Education gets subsidized heavily. -you meet a lot of great people who are passionate about the field.

    Cons

    -long days -low stipend -constant pressure during the training period

    4 people found this review helpful
  2. 3.0
    Former Employee

    Teaching Fellow

    Feb 9, 2018 -  
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    You can learn a lot if you apply yourself, go in with an open mind, and desire to work in a NYC school that likely is underserved. Since my fellowship, I have had experience subbing in independent and private schools, and I have found that many of the techniques (especially with respect to behavior management) are really helpful in the classroom, and in fact, you may emerge having a better idea of how to engage students than those who do other paths to teaching. You also join a cohort of educators, and it is wonderful to develop a supportive peer network (and trust me, you will need it!) I learned an immense amount from the Head Instructor who taught us the NYC fellows curriculum in the summer.

    Cons

    There are MANY cons to the program, unfortunately. If you really want to develop as a teacher, you won't be able to do so reflectively, applying your masters' degree coursework in the classroom. You are just trying to stay alive. Being a first year teacher is challenging enough as it is, but to try to do so while taking graduate courses is extremely taxing. Also, the schools that hire fellows are often very, very limited in funds, can be hostile work environments, lacking in administrative support, etc. Many of us are drawn to the program because we truly desire to help make education in the city more equitable, but in my experience, the obstacles present at the hiring schools can be insurmountable. I think there ARE many teachers who emerge from the program with a job at a school that they love, so be smart as you do your job search. Other cons: you don't get to pick the area in which you receive your certification, because the selection process is based upon school need. Also, the pre-service training (which is the summer school intensive training) does not necessarily prepare you for your classroom in the fall. For instance, all of the literacy lesson planning you learn through the Fellows curriculum is actually quite good. However, if you are doing elementary education, or high-school science, it is essentially useless. Therefore, you start your job in the fall without any practical /applicable experience, and can't know how much you like it and/or how well you will do. Also, there is often lack of coordination between the DOE and your graduate school from an administration standpoint, so at times you have to "jump through hoops" to get some of the backend work completely as far as your certification requirements are concerned. Ultimately, if you can afford to go to graduate school and work part/full time in another capacity, you will have a much better outcome.

    Continue reading
    11 people found this review helpful
  3. Join the NYC Teaching Fellows team
    See Our Latest Jobs
  4. 3.0
    Current Employee, more than 3 years

    The Program Is Done Poorly, But Sometimes There Isn't a Better Choice

    Nov 1, 2017 - ENL Teacher in Brooklyn, NY
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    - You are allowed to work as a fully-paid NYC teacher while getting your certification. (For me, a father supporting my family on my single income, two years in a traditional teaching school was not an option.)

    Cons

    - Grueling. - Management, classes, training, schedules, everything is poorly organized. - The grad school classes may have little to do with what is actually going on in your classroom. - Grueling.

    Continue reading
    2 people found this review helpful
  5. 3.0
    Former Employee

    Teaching Fellows

    Aug 16, 2017 -  
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Masters Degree while working Get to meet other teachers in NYC and because the program is so intense you become close very quickly

    Cons

    Summer is very difficult. Make sure you know you would be really great at it before you quit your job and take the leap.

    Continue reading
    7 people found this review helpful
  6. 1.0
    Former Employee

    Beware before you make any commitment to this job

    Aug 20, 2016 - Teaching Fellow 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    If there is only one 'pro' I can think of, it would be that the fellowship offers a faster alternative route to obtaining a job with the NYC DOE.

    Cons

    Where do I begin? To start, the fellowship's model of education is more like boot camp. They are not interested in producing educators; they want drill sergeants. You will spend many hours per day role-playing scenarios with your colleagues and coaches about managing student behavior. Your coaches will read to you from a power point for three hours straight, and they will model 'effective classroom teaching' by doing things like rewarding you with candy for giving the right answer, as if you are a kid and demanding that you sit upfront and direct your attention to the instructor at all times, among other things. Second, the education classes that you take at your university are useless. You will not learn any academic content at all; research papers, for example, are extended personal reflection essays about anecdotal experiences. Your professor's lecture will consist of reading from a power-point projector verbatim. To make would matters worse, they have people who have no background in mathematics, for example, teach math regents classes to students who failed their regents. To say that is unethical would be an understatement. Finally, fellowship predetermines that 15% of fellows need "professional improvement", and they dismiss this 15% from the program at the last day of training. Even if you had already accepted a job offer within the DOE, the fellowship will demand that you withdraw from your job offer. This is wholly unacceptable, especially when they accept people from all walk of life and with various circumstances to commit to weekdays that begin at 7am and end at 7pm.

    Continue reading
    12 people found this review helpful
  7. 1.0
    Former Intern

    Teaching Fellow Reject

    Aug 20, 2017 - NYC Teaching Fellow in New York, NY
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    If you succeed in the program you are fast tracked into a job with not only health care, benefits but a career where you get to have positive impacts and kids live ... where you can do home and feel like you are having a positive impact on the world. I decided I wanted to this program because I love kids and want to help them grow up into smart, confident, adults of tomororw. I have so many friends from this program who I love and wish the best for all of them. I think some really A-type personalities, people with previous in school jobs such as paraprofessional or substitute teachers can really thrive under these conditions I hope are really successful and make NYC a better place for students to learn and grow.

    Cons

    PST is Horrible. Having grad school after wards makes your life insane and unlivable. The hours of PST are insane. I wake up at 4:30 am would leave my house at 6 am, go to Harlem til 3 go to grad school. Get home at 8 pm. And lesson plan and print until like 1 pm and I'm crying. They said this isn't the case because you can work during your 6 hour training period but without the internet ( the internet doesn't let you go to educational websites of even the department of ed website)or a printer. There the at you training place is pretty useless for preparing lesson plans..... that gets done at 1 am live a crazy person. You're so busy and tired I don't think you can really create high-quality work you're expected to create daily. I easily printed 60 pages every single day. They tell you that you can get work done there which isn't true at all. No websites work. We weren't; able to able to use printers in the school even though the work was meant to for classes within the school. During student teaching, you're basically free labor who are provided zero resources. They provide a very meager stipend in comparison to the hours and hours of labor( when you; you providing and its especially bad considering there all kind so the expenses you have to have printers, just to provide our self-sponsored materials these schools such as laminators, papers, etc etc.) Seriously I am grateful for the stipend, but it's not going to get you through this without other kinds of savings or serious support. My Unethical Evaluation Experience. ever ever And 4 observers come in which isn't normal.... They stand behind the students, freaking then out and distracting them and they complain they worksheet is too rigorous for students at their level-- even though I have a portfolio of these kids working at this level work weeks. The teacher stepped in saying I was right about the level of difficulty of work. Then we had a wrap-up meeting about it and I was the craziest thing ever. They were straight up telling me all this stuff that wasn't true at all. First, my "coach" said she had an issue with my lesson plan but then had to ask for one, because she had neither read or seen it. She said the lesson plan was unaligned which is tricky because they are special needs kids but still have to use the common curriculum standards for the grade they are supposed to be in. That's been the standard for the entire program this Summer, but I had even double checked.to make sure it was a good fit for my lesson the day before with my teacher. I'm positive if I had done otherwise I would have would have been marked down for that. I had the worksheet they say the kid never got, he had wrong his name and the date on it. They also said all kinds of things I did wrong-- but I had these documents demonstrating that it wasn't the case. They literally said well it's too late don't we don't care and they're not going to do anything. Like isn't a coach supposed to care and help you succeed in a program, not to be incredibly uncaring and apathetic that their scoring is fair or accurate? Honestly, I really think they didn't like me in the program or saw me struggling in the beginning, but then my evaluations we're getting way better and they wanted to make the date and eval grades match what they thought of me. Its seriously got a cult mentality going on within that whole program and if you don't fit into that mold it's clear you're not going to get fair grading in this program. I would even go as far as to say that go out of their way to sabotage people they don't like. My lesson plan was ready, it was polished and beautiful. The grades they gave me were the worst I had gotten all Summer, which makes zero sense. Also, my coach went on telling my co-teacher that her kids aren't at the levels she saying they are, which is an interesting/ unprofessional outsider perspective to share with someone who has worked with the same kids for 4 years. A meeting with a rude apathetic "coach" who clearly doesn't give a hoot Honestly, I am OK with not passing the fellows. I am still upset that I worked myself to death only to be disrespected and unfairly evaluated. At the same time, I really do care and want to be a teacher. A huge majority of the people in Fellows are former substitute teachers and paraprofessionals. They have a huge of amount of in-class experience that makes a 2 month training period and then poof you're a teacher less insane. I left the fellows to program upset about how it ended but also completely unprepared to be a teacher this fall. A lot of my friends in the program are superstars and I know they will do great... I think I need a little more time and want to go more traditional route to teaching. I have a feeling that if I entered a school with so little training and field experience I would fail and shortchange my students.

    Continue reading
    3 people found this review helpful
Viewing 1 - 2 of 2 English Reviews
</>Embed

Work at NYC Teaching Fellows? Share Your Experiences

NYC Teaching Fellows logo
or

Reviews by Job Title

Expert Career Advice

Guide to Getting Your First Job

Find a Great First Job to Jumpstart Your Career

How to Get a Job

Getting a Job Is Tough; This Guide Makes it Easier

How to Get a Promotion

Climb the Ladder With These Proven Promotion Tips

How to Negotiate Your Salary

A Guide to Negotiating the Salary You Deserve

How to Write a Resume

Write a Resume Recruiters Can't Resist

NYC Teaching Fellows Job Seekers Also Viewed

Success Academy Charter Schools Logo
Success Academy Charter Schools

2.7

1,683 Reviews
Compare

Glassdoor has 76 NYC Teaching Fellows reviews submitted anonymously by NYC Teaching Fellows employees. Read employee reviews and ratings on Glassdoor to decide if NYC Teaching Fellows is right for you.