National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Reviews | Glassdoor

National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Reviews

Updated February 7, 2017
30 reviews

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2.5
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Lamar Hasbrouk
7 Ratings

30 Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (2)

    "Great mission and staff, but big management problems"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Program Analyst
    Former Employee - Senior Program Analyst
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    NACCHO’s mission is critical to our national public health infrastructure and it should be an amazing place to work. The staff is made up of very talented and diverse people who all want to serve the mission. The staff members are also highly engaged and motivated to achieve high quality performance. You can’t ask for a workforce more supportive of the organization. There is also a great willingness to collaborate among teams. The work is rewarding and my experiences working with local health departments are something I will carry with me throughout my career.

    Cons

    Organizations go through phases and have their ups and downs. Unfortunately, I think NACCHO is going through a tough time. There is a high level of dissatisfaction among employees and an outrageous amount of turnover. Some of this can be attributed to organizational growing pains and a change in top-level leadership in 2015. However, the primary source of poor morale seems to relate to the staff relationship with the executive director. Since the present executive director took the helm in early 2015, there has been an ever-widening rift between the executive team and other staff. Initially, staff members were excited about the new energy. But then the executive team was elevated to a loftier and distant position. Staff are disrespected amd marginalized. Rather that working “with” the staff, things are being done “to” the staff. Time has only made the situation worse and a negative undercurrent permeates.

    The Human Resources office has a systemic problem with performance. It is not uncommon for staff to experience significant disruptions or errors in HR-related processes due to a lack of management or follow through by the HR team. Opportunities for growth are given inconsistently, and this is the fault of both HR and managers. Rules are applied to some but not to others. Some managers are far too friendly with HR, suggesting that if you ever do have a conflict with your manager, you won't get a fair shake. While the executive staff are aware of these problems and have applied additional staff support to the HR team, the issues seem to continue.

    There is also an executive team member that has risen through the ranks fairly quickly but has not developed the skills necessary to be a good leader. The person (“they”) either forgets the decisions and directives they issue or changes their mind frequently. I experienced several instances of this that put me in awkward situations of initiating work on one path only to be told that a completely different progression should have been used. They will not put decisions in writing for confirmation or later reference. They also do not monitor email well for critical communications. They value quantity over quality. There was at least one case in which a budget was reduced by the funding agency, but they reported the team could still deliver the same amount of work (a risky precedent to set with funders). They often does not provide support at critical points in the execution of projects when leadership is needed, but micromanages inconsequential activities, seemingly latching on to the things that are familiar. External partners have commented that the person seems disengaged and unknowledgeable of fundamental components of projects. They also, probably unwittingly, demonstrates a degree of favoritism to the sub-team with which they are most familiar.

    As with all organizations, the climate will change. I am hopeful NACCHO will again become a workplace where staff members are content and satisfied.

    Advice to Management

    The conflict between the executive director and staff must be resolved. It is likely that the only way to do that is with a new executive director. Human Resources team needs a new director, should be held accountable for their performance, and supported however necessary to properly fulfill their roles. Executive team members and senior staff should receive ongoing training in leadership and team management.


  2. "Ok"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Fairly laid back working environment

    Cons

    Too much busy work and not enough time on what is impactful. Limited understanding of public health departments by many staff.


  3. "Fantastic organization to intern with!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends

    Pros

    Great experience in health related policy and working on the hill. Friendly and helpful staff !

    Cons

    This is an unpaid internship and no additional assistance with metro costs.


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  5. Helpful (6)

    "Top-heavy organization, with high turnaround"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Flexible work schedule, telework opportunities, decent benefits

    Cons

    The association appears to have a revolving door. There are always people coming and going. Plus, there are quite a lot of directors that tend to "hog" the work and leave little for their staff to do (besides administrative work of course).


  6. Helpful (6)

    "NACCHO Reaps What It Sows"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Good staff who are dedicated to public health. Lot's of opportunities to work with local health departments.

    Cons

    NACCHO's leadership makes it clear that it does not respect the staff. Employing a variety of archaic management techniques like fear, poor communication, and selectively applied policies, NACCHO's leadership keeps people down or forces them out. Stupefied by the concept of personal responsibility, NACCHO's leadership uses classic blame throwing techniques to shame staff.

    Advice to Management

    Move on and let competent people take over.


  7. Helpful (6)

    "No vision"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Program staff are smart, talented, and excited about public health.
    Good work-life balance.
    Decent pay if you are single, under 30.

    Cons

    Senior- and mid-level management get in their own way. They focus on unimportant, internal minutiae (e.g. travel policies, staff "development') and then execute them in incompetent ways. They do not focus on our funders or members. They do not listen to junior and mid-level staff although we are bleeding people. Junior staff are treated with suspicion and seen as "complainers."

    Senior staff do not know what program staff do. This is evident in the kinds of people they ping with questions and their ideas for our projects. Because they don't know what we do, they think it takes 3-5 years to be ready for the next level. Laughable. Staff do the jobs above them until they are "awarded" a promotion for work they already do.
    The organization is run by incompetent micro-managers. When it comes to program management they are "penny wise, pound foolish."

    Advice to Management

    Advice to the BOARD: do a 360 review of senior leadership. Clean house.
    Up your pay for mid-level managers so you can maintain institutional knowledge. Clarify the differences between PAs and SPAs so you don't have people languishing in underpaid positions. Tighten up your programming to focus on what you do best. Forget a consulting model when you're a BLOCK from K street, smh.


  8. Helpful (5)

    "In Decline"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Program Analyst
    Former Employee - Program Analyst
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Mission of organization is great. Work done over the years has significantly supported public health at the local level. Connecting with professionals across the country allows (especially junior staff) great career and perspective growth.

    Cons

    With new executive leadership, the organization has taken a nose-dive. Position turnover has increased and programmatic work has felt the strain. Senior leadership is oblivious to the struggle of sub-director level staff to maintain ongoing projects and deliverables. Efforts made by HR and senior leadership to identify these issues have come across as fake, impersonal, and apathetic. There is limited organizational desire to pursue new, creative programmatic approaches.

    Intelligent, dedicated folks have left quickly because of the stagnation, bureaucracy, and unfair work expectations of the hierarchy. It seems that the fundamental values of this organization have been lost and ultimately the membership will continue to lose faith in what was once a great advocate in Washington. Truly an unfortunate consequence of a problem that could've been corrected with deft organizational management,

    Advice to Management

    Board: Time to purge senior management and HR. Conduct reviews and evaluations of ALL staff to identify organizational misconceptions or areas for improvement. Standardize hiring/firing and review framework. Help foster an environment that steers the creative energy and industriousness of junior staff rather than crushing it.


  9. Helpful (1)

    "Ok"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Good coworkers. Good location in downtown DC.

    Cons

    Low pay. Senior management was unresponsive.


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Program Analyst"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    - Decent salary
    - Flexible schedule at 6 months

    Cons

    - Lots of bureaucracy
    - Poor supervisors
    - Disconnected process
    - Limited work

    Advice to Management

    Provide the environment to work which you stated in job description and interview.


  11. Helpful (4)

    "Great staff, terrible management"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) full-time

    Pros

    The mid-level staff are smart and passionate. Lots of travel (if you consider that a pro as I do)

    Cons

    Not ran as an association but as a government contractor as most budget money comes from the CDC. A LOT of red tape and internal management issues.



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