National Multiple Sclerosis Society Reviews | Glassdoor

National Multiple Sclerosis Society Reviews

Updated February 3, 2019
194 reviews

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2.8
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Cyndi Zagieboylo
76 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • "A great place to feel like you are making a difference in the lives of those with MS" (in 9 reviews)

  • "Friendly work environment and very nice people" (in 9 reviews)

Cons
  • "When I was in the office, there was a high turnover of former employees as the organization restructured itself" (in 13 reviews)

  • "No real work-life balance although they claim it's important" (in 6 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (1)

    "NON-PROFIT"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Executive Assistant in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Executive Assistant in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    It gives you the opportunity to help others while helping yourself.

    Cons

    There were no cons working there.

    Advice to Management

    Continue to solicit input from staff


  2. Helpful (3)

    "Great mission, not so great place to work."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Accounting
    Former Employee - Accounting
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    The mission statement(s) is (are) inspiring.

    Cons

    Actual work life is not inspiring. No real work-life balance although they claim it's important. Doesn't exist. You're available 24/7. Low pay, lots of hours, top down management style. Very corporate, in the worst sense of the word.

    Advice to Management

    Don't think you have all the answers and don't think you're the smartest people in the room, because you're not. Listen to others. You might learn something.

  3. Helpful (2)

    "Campaign Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Campaign Manager
    Former Employee - Campaign Manager
    Doesn't Recommend
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good benefits, comp days for working events, amazing cause

    Cons

    Long hours, minimal help from management, non competitive pay


  4. Helpful (9)

    "Culture and morale faltering, but mission is amazing."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Development Manager
    Former Employee - Development Manager
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Working with my functional team on Walk MS was amazing. We collaborated and shared ideas across many different states. I learned a lot and felt like my contributions were appreciated and respected.

    Cons

    Working across multuple revenue streams creates more meetings than anyone should ever be expected to participate in and blended roles are not feasiable in the current management structure.The President of the region has created a toxic culture and staff are leaving in hordes. The expectation of departments working together isn't actually enforced. Lots of confusion of what is going on in other parts of the country and what expectations are because of a lack of communication. Realigned as a national organization with marketing being under the leadership of the national office, but fundraising is still regional...makes no sense. HUGE identity crisis.

    Advice to Management

    Rethink your matrix management system or eliminate blended roles. Rethink the need for regional Presidents/ED's or create a clearer description of what they are actually supposed to be doing. Take your staff's concerns, comments, and questions seriously and worked harder to improve the work culture.


  5. Helpful (2)

    "Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Manager in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Great mission, constituents, volunteer leaders and local staff.

    Cons

    Staff resources are spread way too thin.


  6. Helpful (8)

    "Senior Leadership Double Talk"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time

    Pros

    Positive mission and most people want to make a difference. Jeans dress code throughout the year. Decent benefits (although changing) and generous paid time off.

    Cons

    Senior Leadership claims to want to talk straight and have honest conversations. When you embrace this you are usually treated poorly if your opinion is not aligned with that of the executive team. The cliques are pretty bad and rarely do people work outside their job's department. Collaboration is not executed in an efficient way and decisions take much too long. Culture is poor and the executive team contributes to this extensively by chastising employees for trying new things that aren't a success, wasting time over formats and wording, and even deliberately embarrassing staff.

    Advice to Management

    Learn to respect all of your staff through actions and not your words. You should take responsibility for leading the organization. And most importantly, listen to your staff if you truly believe in talking straight.


  7. "Slow pace but good benefits"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time

    Pros

    Generally, good people with a heart for service

    Cons

    The technology was out of date and the overall pace of business was too slow for my liking.

  8. Helpful (2)

    "-"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time

    Pros

    Better pay than most nonprofits

    Cons

    Lots of work needs to be done on leadership and company moral.


  9. Helpful (14)

    "Senior Management Team member. Nineteen years with the organization."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Vice President in Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Vice President in Austin, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Important mission and many wonderful volunteers, especially at the “hands on” level. For both employees and volunteers there are opportunities for professional learning. Pay and health benefits for employees are competitive. There are some meaningful attempts at transparency in decision making. There is a level of professionalism sometimes lacking in non profits. The Society is the largest funder of MS research in the world. Most treatments would not exist without their support. So - there is pride in being part of that.

    Cons

    I had a good career at the MS Society. I performed work I was proud of. I had a chance to make the world a better place, and to use my best skills in the service of those things But- I still struggle with the bad taste left in my mouth at the end of a nearly 20 year career. Here’s why:
    1) I was part of a senior management team that met regularly. There were many on the team that out ranked me. Yet I was a member. And I contributed. On my departure (voluntary) the CEO refused to acknowledge my departure with an email. A courtesy she gave others on the team with a higher rank. Am I on the team or not? —- Gut punch.
    2) I attended a last meeting of my local leadership team at which the CEO informed my supervisor he should have given me “a pass”. I was still a loyal advocate. Why exclude me? Just because I’m leaving doesn’t mean I can’t contribute. I’d get it if I was fired but....
    3) I got no exit interview. Seriously? 19 years? Come on


  10. Helpful (5)

    "Cookie Cutters are for Cookies"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at National Multiple Sclerosis Society full-time

    Pros

    Important cause with wonderful community support that is making a difference in peoples lives. Some of the new changes being made are helping smaller offices without resources. Track record of producing successful programs, services and events

    Cons

    Culture is being completely changed with lack of regard for the people. Upper Management says the staff is the most valuable resource but actions don't follow. Fundraising is subject to many factors outside of human control (weather, economy, timing, etc) but lack of experience from talking heads

    Advice to Management

    Be kind. Be honest. Stop the cliques. Leave the cookie cutters for the bakers. Continue to reverse poor HR decisions. If you ask staff how they feel, don't be surprised if they tell you the truth and don't punish them for speaking the truth. Allow local benefits with low cost, high value to employees. Beware of things done for the sake of appearances or as a symbolic gesture.