Pendo Raleigh Reviews

Updated Feb 9, 2021

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3.8
64%
Recommend to a Friend
74%
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Pendo Founder and CEO Todd Olson (no image)
Todd Olson
43 Ratings
  1. Helpful (1)

    "Challenging, fast paced, and rewarding work"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Data Engineer in Raleigh, NC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Pendo full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Pendo's people team and leadership really do make it a pleasure to work for Pendo. There is always an opportunity to learn and grow through courses offered or seminars being hosted. Managers have weekly meetings with their reportees, which goes a long way to feeling heard. There is a lot of trust and responsibility passed down to individual contributors. Ownership for a company and customer impacting project can be held by only one person, although usually there is more support. The company culture continues to encourage a healthy work/life balance, meaning no shame for using unlimited time off, no shame for mental health days, and understanding work-from-home challenges. There are crunch periods, but there is not a crunch culture - I've never had the impression from managers or peers that a deadline is more important than capping my day at 10 hours. Pendo is incredibly transparent. Through bi-weekly town halls, there is always clear communication of our financial position, and market challenges and opportunities. That transparency goes a long way to feeling job security, understanding leadership decisions, and believing in the company's strategy.

    Cons

    Hiring often lags behind volume of work. Although no crunch culture, it can be personally overwhelming to watch a backlog grow for months without a job posting. Structure is still developing. Don't expect an interviewing playbook or job development checklist or clear lines of promotion. However, it can be exciting to contribute to these processes. Rapid changes. It takes significant attention to keep on the up-and-up with the changes of each department. If you take your eye off of any one department for 6 months, it is unlikely you'll recognize the people and processes. Change can be exciting, and sometimes overwhelming.

  2. Helpful (21)

    "Fun, but we have some concerns."

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Raleigh, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Pendo full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    I've been working for the company for about three years. The pace is fast, we have a lot of fun, and generally, I enjoy my work.

    Cons

    I am really concerned about certain members of culture/leadership at this company, and I think there are specific people high up that are poisonous, and going to be detrimental to the success of the company.

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  3. COVID-19
    Helpful (29)

    "I would skip it"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Customer Success Manager in Raleigh, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Pendo full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The people. Pendo's ICs (and some leaders) are incredibly hardworking, kind, thoughtful, creative individuals. The brilliance and talent among my team was unmatched. Even when folks were operating on fumes and beyond burnt out, they were always willing to step in and answer questions, help out, and collaborate.

    Cons

    Low compensation compared to market averages and no pay transparency: I started at Pendo making $67k annually (I took a pay cut to join, which I later found out is not uncommon). I was originally offered $65k and when I countered asking to match what I was making (in the same city, same industry, same size company) I was told that per their policy they could not pay me more than the person making the most for that position (despite me having more years of experience). They never shared any salary ranges for any of the positions available on our team, so I have no idea what I was making compared to anyone else. They also had no job mapping available for our department, so it was a complete guess as to when and if you got a promotion or comp adjustment. They do "annual comp adjustments" at the same time every year. My comp adjustment my first year was $1k (less than an average cost of living raise). It took 1 year and 8 months to get a 10% pay increase that came with a title change. When I was offered a new position outside of the company making 100k annually, I was told by Pendo that they would never be able to offer me that much for my current title. So that was twice that these mysterious private pay bands appeared. It was a very common ask to management for pay transparency, job mapping/requirements, and professional development opportunities during my entire tenure. And for my entire tenure (2 years) they were "coming soon". Inconsistent and arbitrary key performance indicators, goals, and metrics: Nearly every quarter we were given something new to focus on. I understand and embrace having to be agile, but this definitely felt more like throwing spaghetti at a wall. You would be asked to introduce customers to Big Important Self-Serving Initiatives at the beginning of a quarter only to never talk about them again (possibly a result of steady attrition and turnover, Pendo "parted ways with" people often). My customers quickly became aware that many of these things lacked actual value for them, but they were nice enough to take meetings anyway so that I could hit my goals for the quarter. Lack of freedom to do your job: Pendo hires incredibly talented people who are good at what they do, but you would never know it based on the amount of leeway given to us. I truly worked with some of the best CSMs in the industry, who were rarely given time and space to shine or manage their book of business as they saw fit. Most teams were measured against strict goals for calls/activities, success plans, quarterly business reviews, retention, *insert random new goal here*, and expansion, all while trying to simultaneously provide level 1 product support (because it doesn't exist), provide product training (because it doesn't exist), fight fires, escalate risk, coordinate meetings, take feedback. I never felt like the company understood the value a Customer Success Manager brings the business. If they did, they would have given our team more support to do our jobs instead of leaving us to do every job no one else wanted to do. Lack of WFH flexibility: COVID has made it extremely clear that Pendo is and always will be in-office first and isn't looking to pivot (hence the office remaining open while cases continue to spike in NC). My gut tells me it's because they're equating "culture" with office perks like cold brew on-tap and lunch once a week, a kegerator, lots of liquor/booze, and free t-shirts. It feels very isolating if you do work from home, there's little support or asynchronous communication for distributed team members or anyone who isn't at HQ in Raleigh. Very few operations or processes exist: Year 7+ of being a "start up" with hundreds of millions of dollars in funding, a one billion dollar valuation, offices around the world, hundreds of employees. The "we're a start up" response is used as a band-aid for bad business decisions most of the time. It also comes in handy for them when folks have valid feedback or constructive criticism. It's hard to feel heard: This used to feel less true, but then some big things changed.. they stopped having anonymous AMAs for the CEO be visible to everyone (which allowed for some transparency and accountability), they also stopped anonymous employee NPS surveys. I for sure would not feel comfortable being 'honest' with my name attached to my feedback. I filled out surveys, went to management quarter after quarter (and I was not alone) with feedback about the competing priorities and initiatives, lack of KPIs/metrics, and all of the cons listed above, but was met with more empty promises (or got told that I just needed to manage my time better, or got told "we're a start-up!"). Performative allyship: To be expected at a tech company, but worth calling out nonetheless because it was particularly bad here. Everything is optics. Most mentions of accountability were auto-replied with "assume positive intent" without reflecting on power dynamics, privilege, etc. It gets really really frustrating. There are a few people with power at Pendo that do genuinely care about diversity, equity, and inclusion, but they certainly don't outweigh or outnumber ones that don't.

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  4. Helpful (26)

    "Cult of personality"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Quality Engineer in Raleigh, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Pendo full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The people I worked with each day were passionate about their jobs and wanted to make a difference. The location in downtown Raleigh is pretty cool. The product itself has a lot of potential to really help other companies.

    Cons

    Pendo is the closest I think I'll ever come to knowing what it's like to be in a cult. Everyone here keeps pretending like it's still a plucky startup but as of this writing Pendo has been around for 8 years, is valued at over $1B, and has hundreds of employees all over the world. That is a far throw from startup territory. Testing at the company is a mess. For reasons unknown a bunch of QA managers with manual testing backgrounds have been put in charge of all things QA so instead of adopting modern techniques like automation or test-driven development we still operate in a manual world. If you suggest trying automation you're viewed as an imbecile because according to the managers that never works. How they would know when they have no experience in the matter is a moot point apparently. In spite of having hundreds of employees and counting the C-suite still like to micromanage. Even the hiring of a new engineer can't be approved without their say. The company brags about being a pioneer in the agile space but doesn't follow many of the best practices for agile. My project teams always had at least 15 members and we followed a mini waterfall cadence. Since QA is only allowed to do manual testing and is regularly understaffed there's too much work for us to do so despite the claims of good work-life balance it was normal to work 50 to 60 hours a week. If you ask management about the ways we as a company don't adhere to our own values management puts the onus on you for not knowing how to fit in at Pendo and will often use brutal honesty as an excuse to insult those who dare to ask such questions. Career opportunities exist for QA but only if you embrace the Pendo way which since it contradicts testing trends in the industry means putting your chances of a job outside Pendo in jeopardy. Compensation is unimpressive as the massive increases in revenue have led to massive increases in pay for the C-suite but haven't trickled down to meaningful improvements in pay or benefits for the employees. D&I is something that management claims to care about very much yet the company continues to pack leadership roles with middle aged white guys. Turnover is starting to become a problem as talented employees are realizing that there are better paychecks and cultures and more exciting work elsewhere. QA in particular can't seem to keep new hires for more than two years. Yet if you don't pretend like Pendo is the best place in the world, wear your pink shirt with pride, and lie prostrate before the founders with blind admiration then you are considered to not be fitting in with Pendo culture and risk being ostracized.

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    Pendo Response

    January 25, 2021CEO

    Thank you for your feedback, and we’re sorry that your experience at Pendo wasn’t great. We will certainly take this feedback to examine internally. It’s true that I like to think of us as a startup, and it’s also true that we have nearly 500 team members spread across 7 offices globally. I suppose it’s perspective. And yes, you are correct I or Erik (our CTO) do meet with nearly every candidate, but we don’t do it to micromanage. We meet with folks to ensure it’s a good fit. Pendo is not for everyone, and it’s more advantageous for all parties to spend time up front assessing this fit. I believe that having more individuals (and perspectives) involved in the decision leads to better (albeit not perfect) outcomes. Regarding your comments on QA, I do want to clarify a few points. When we were truly a startup (only a few years ago) we ran super fast and didn’t always build the necessary automation. For these reasons, we still employ some manual and exploratory testing to maintain quality. We have invested in automation since that time. Our backend has around 80% coverage within unit tests, and we continue to make measurable improvements in our front-end automation. Last year, we launched a QA lab in our Sheffield office focused on automation. Our development teams (typically 6-10 individuals) work in 2-week sprints, and while our agile practices are imperfect, we continue to inspect and adapt. In October, we conducted a compensation benchmarking process to ensure fairness and market competitiveness in our pay practices across the company. This resulted in a number of changes, but we know that it wasn’t perfect (it was our first time going through this). We will definitely apply our learnings as we move forward, are beginning to put proactive programs & philosophies in place around compensation and we will also take this feedback into consideration.

  5. Helpful (3)

    "Brutal Honestly can be helpful, but it also can be brutal"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Director in Raleigh, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Pendo full-time

    Pros

    The people are extremely competent, intelligent, and generally very nice to work with.

    Cons

    There is a very vocal subset of the organization who feel compelled to "complain" about everything under the guise of the company value of Brutal Honesty.

  6. "Wonderful professional and social experience"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Software Engineer Intern in Raleigh, NC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Pendo for less than a year

    Pros

    I loved my time at Pendo. The work environment and office culture were so supportive and energetic! I was given a project of significance to my team and the company and got to deploy a lot of code to production. My manager and mentor really cared about my progress and were very supportive. Would recommend this company highly.

    Cons

    Pay isn't as competitive as companies in SF, for example, but cost of living in Raleigh is much lower. And Raleigh has a really cool music and food scene!

  7. Helpful (1)

    "Wonderful place to work"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Business Development Representative in Raleigh, NC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Pendo full-time

    Pros

    Pendo is company that values professional growth and professional development. The people make it. Everyone works super hard but also takes time to take care of their personal lives.

    Cons

    None- great place to work and grow as professional

  8. "World class culture, rapidly growing market, great company"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Vice President of Sales in Raleigh, NC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Pendo full-time

    Pros

    The values are made very real and actively nurtured. The product is generally excellent and customers love it. Pay ranges are highly competitive. Internal politics and ego are minimal. You can truly be a human at work.

    Cons

    Uneven track record on DEI, slow to embrace WFH

  9. Helpful (10)

    "Buckle up"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Raleigh, NC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Pendo full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    I’ve been here a couple years. There’s a lot of things that Pendo does great. They care about culture and make it known through fun activities, t-shirts, random swag, etc. The people here are all very smart and determined. The product itself is good. Career progression is clearly outlined. At least for engineering.

    Cons

    It’s still a startup. Experiments are constantly being taken. Things move fast. Roadmap changes are frequent as well as shifting people around to different teams. It can be a pretty stressful and draining environment as thing things you’re working on are priority #1 ... until they aren’t a month later. And you have to focus intensely on the next thing handed down.

    Pendo Response

    January 25, 2021CEO

    Thank you for offering this perspective on both the benefits and challenges of working at a fast-growth startup. I’m glad you recognize our efforts to try to always cultivate an environment where Pendozers enjoy working. That’s been a big commitment of ours since day one. But yes, we are still in our infancy as a business, and as we both innovate in a new market and react to the world around us, our roadmap can shift at times. I do feel that we’ve kept incredible focus over the past 12 months toward meeting the goals we set for the year. I’m excited to review them with the company at our annual kickoff in February and continue the momentum into our fiscal year 2022.

  10. Helpful (33)

    "Shiny exterior hiding a toxic company structure"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Raleigh, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Pendo full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Employees at Pendo work incredibly hard. The individual contributors you work with day to day are pleasant and innovative. There is a lot of effort toward everyday employee perks and branding, from snacks to t-shirts.

    Cons

    Pendo is a chaotic company. There is a lot of reactive decision making from leadership, coupled with brash, arrogant, and oftentimes unprofessional behavior acted out under the guise of “brutal honesty”, one of the prominent core values. I’ve never worked in an organization that feels this top heavy- some of the most inconsequential items need to be approved by the C suite. For a company that values “bias to act”, leadership fails to create an environment that makes that core value tenable for its employees. There is a real lack of trust from the top down. The need to please leadership to get things done at Pendo has led to a toxic company culture, where in order to get ahead it’s necessary to adopt a sycophantic attitude to those in charge. If you don’t, don’t be too surprised if you are let go or forced out. In the meantime, employees spend so much time making sure they seem “bought in” enough, that no one bats an eye at any of the questionable decisions being handed down from the top. It can often feel cult-like in that way- any dissidents are dismissed for questioning leaders at Pendo. There is a lack of data around pay and objective requirements on tracks to be promoted, or to at least have your salary increase. This lack of data has led to high turnover, vast inequity, and sub-market pay. It feels like employees are placated instead by being promised that they’re part of a tech “unicorn” that will eventually have a big pay off. It’s a shame, because there are so many good people and hard workers that have been caught in the wake of big egos and sloppy processes at Pendo.

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    Pendo Response

    January 25, 2021CEO

    Thank you for taking time to share these thoughts. And, I regret that you had a negative experience working at Pendo. I really hope you have found a new role that suits you. I did want to address a few of your comments. Startups, almost by nature, feel chaotic at times. We are a young company, creating a new market, and we are also responding to a lot happening in the world around us. While we have a pretty regimented planning cadence (every annual and quarter), there are certain changes in our business and in our market that require us to respond. Anyone who works at Pendo should be prepared to be nimble. You mentioned our core values, and I believe that a couple of our stated values relate to that necessary flexibility for our stage of company—bias to act and freedom and responsibility. We need employees at Pendo to take ownership over problems or challenges they see in the business and to help us find solutions. I believe these (and all of our values, frankly) are very actionable. And if I ever question that, I read through the Slack channel where employees give each other “panks” and recognize each other for specific ways they are living out our values. That said, we have always had a company practice to revisit our values on an annual basis to ensure we are continuing to interpret & live them consistently as well as test if they need to shift or change as we grow. As we are about to kick off that process together, we will definitely take the feedback in your post into our discussions. Regarding salary transparency, you are correct that we do not share employee salaries openly. We view an individual’s salary as their personal and confidential information. In October, we completed a compensation benchmarking exercise to ensure fairness and market competitiveness across the company. This resulted in a number of changes, but we know that it wasn’t perfect (it was our first time). We recently hired Pendo’s first-ever Chief People Officer and are excited to partner with her and her team to assess & define Pendo’s go forward compensation & career development practices. Lastly, I want to reiterate that I have an open-door policy. I want employees to come to talk to me if they experience any behavior at Pendo that they feel contradicts our values. I reiterate this in every new hire orientation and frequently during our biweekly town hall meetings. The leadership team can only address these issues if they are proactively shared. Again, thank you for sharing this feedback.

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