Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. Reviews | Glassdoor

Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. Reviews

Updated November 14, 2016
19 reviews

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Perry Turbes
10 Ratings

19 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • great exposure to the oil and gas industry and business (in 16 reviews)

  • Good starting salary, semi-annual bonuses, learn as much technical information as you like, learn about a specific niche in the oil and gas industry (in 8 reviews)

Cons
  • Work/life balance is unheard of outside of higher managements (in 20 reviews)

  • From the other posts, you can see that there is inherently no company culture, which is 100% true (in 10 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (15)

    "Not long term career friendly"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good training and collaborative work environment that will rapidly get new employees comfortable debugging, writing, and designing computer code. As others had said, regardless of the position you are hired into, you will be working full time on software. Considering the size of the company, Quorum's software is well structured and maintained entirely in house. This makes it a very strong platform for people looking to build a foundation in software development.

    The object oriented software front end with an Oracle or SQL Server back end is a very very common and in demand software structure. Skills developed at Q are highly transferable.

    Cons

    First, long hours. The Q treats all work on a by the hour basis, and they expect all employees to clock 9 hours a day. 9 billable hours (time spent at work truly working) is extremely demanding when you're paid a fixed salary. Combine 9 hours with a commute to downtown, lunch break, stepping out of the office to make a personal call, etc, and you can kiss your free time good bye.

    Second, unreasonable project management. Quorum sells news features to clients based on an "estimate", which is a rough project outline, and number of hours that the project will take to finish. While I understand that having a way to record what fraction of your time was spent on different tasks is important for estimating schedules and billing clients, having a fixed number of hours in which to do software development is terrible. Computer code is a complex logic puzzle, and any additions to that puzzle requires both logic and creativity. There are many ways to solve a problem, and sometimes those solutions manifest quickly and organically, and sometimes they're a long slog of ideas that didn't pan out. Putting a hard timer over such work is effectively setting employees up to fail.

    Third, inconsistent management. Due to the long hours, and often unreasonable projects, employee turn over is high. The result is that the management team is not always the best leaders and most skilled developers, but often whoever's survived the longest. Large differences in management styles is common, and can cause "office space" like moments where I had 3 different "bosses" on a given project, all telling me slightly different things.

    My time at Q was heavily marred by projects with unrealistic timelines and expectations. Despite scoring "greatly exceeds expectations" on my year end reviews, I was ultimately laid off, and was told the decision was due to "performance issues". I'm not sure how to rectify those two facts.

    Advice to Management

    Abandon the 9 billable hours policy, it just leads to employee burn out. Provide management with team building training to create better and more consistent leadership. Allow development work to be done more free form, with an emphasis placed on the quality of the result, and not on the time spent.

    After being let go from Quorum, I'm now being paid more money and working less hours, while working with the same technologies. I feel more comfortable in the work place and have more satisfaction in my work. Being forced to leave Quorum has improved both my career and life as a whole. You do not live up to the claim of being a "first class place for first class people".


  2. Helpful (1)

    "Not sure of direction"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time

    Pros

    decent salary, good technical experience

    Cons

    no work/life balance, demanding, long hours expected

    Advice to Management

    more communication


  3. Helpful (13)

    "only interested in the bottom line"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Consultant in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Consultant in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    -good starting salary
    -good training

    Cons

    -thrust you into a position even if it does not fit skill set (software development)
    -not clear about the goals they expect from employees
    -have a few "favorites" and everyone else is dispensable
    -no cohesiveness or inclusiveness within the company, all software groups work independently and have not communication

    Advice to Management

    treat your employees better, try to find a fit before thrusting someone into a position


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  5. Helpful (8)

    "Not Quite Consulting"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time

    Pros

    Compensation, Benefits, Young company, Flexibility to work from home occasionally

    Cons

    High turnover, Workload, Management, Lack of transparency

    Advice to Management

    There needs to be better communication within the company.


  6. Helpful (12)

    "Honest Opinion"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Consultant in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Consultant in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Right off the bat, the job is 99% technical (coding skills). Quorum's applications are based off of code that you need to learn to be able to help clients in any capacity. You're given 3 weeks to learn SQL and C# and Crystal Reports and then you get placed in your role after giving a final presentation. Like everyone says, if you're just starting out, this isn't a bad place to be. Unlike other more traditional consulting roles, you actually pick up the hard skill of learning how to code. In addition, you get the people and time management skills that you would get at another consulting company. You also get tremendous autonomy as you gain experience. The flip side to that is, that once you gain that experience, you'll find yourself at a place where you can learn little else.

    Cons

    Honestly, the bottom line seems to mean more than anything. You have to be billable, and unfortunately if you find an opportunity to create something of value for a client, you can't just work on it, you have to be able to charge it to the client. From the other posts, you can see that there is inherently no company culture, which is 100% true. Also, there are no get togethers. I constaltly saw pictures and videos of my friends during work days go to St. Arnold's and going to Minute Maid Park, but there is absolutely none of that here. Maybe you can go to Flying Saucer (on your dime) with a group.

    Advice to Management

    None. These posts and employees have all mentioned the same thing repeatedly, and it still isn't being followed. Keep doing what you're doing.


  7. Helpful (12)

    "Disgruntled"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Consultant
    Current Employee - Consultant
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Pretty high starting salary (more on that in the cons section.)
    Hires a lot of recent grads so the majority of the company is pretty young and easy to talk to.
    Time off (if you can get it approved.)

    Cons

    tl;dr - Pay isn't that high considering how much you work. Work/life balance is unheard of outside of higher managements. Not much career opportunity past manager.

    Where to start? A little background.

    Quorum is a software company that is trying to do what the ink industry did to the printer industry. Instead of having software that works for the client, they sell software solutions with known bugs that will work 90% of the time unless you run into those bugs and will charge the clients money to fix them.

    The way they charge their clients is pretty brilliant. They have in-scope issues (prepaid), which are issues that Quorum deems to be actual software errors caused by a 'fix' or some interaction that they did not take into consideration. They also have what they call out-of-scope (pay as you go) which are just issues that they do not consider in-scope.

    If you fall in the support side, you'll quickly realize that every client has an in-scope list of issues with hours assigned to each issue. Same for out of scope issues. Lower management who will be managing your support teams are expected to hit certain quotas of out-of-scope issue hours on a weekly basis since the company gets to charge more to the clients that way.

    If you fall in the delivery side, you'll quickly realize that the timeline that the upper management/sales team promised the client is daunting. When you are at client site, ten hour days are the usual and if you are lucky you might be able to leave after nine hours, but don't expect that.

    Development are the more technical hands-on coding side of the Q. You'll constantly be barraged by questions about an enhancement that was finished a couple months past. People will message you on Skype asking whether or not their issue for a client is resolved while you have over 10 sitting on your plate at any given time with an emergency issue that was just given to you at 6 PM when you are packing up that needs to be done right this second.

    Which brings us to the high starting salary. While it looks good on paper, it really isn't. Biggest reason, you will be an at-will salaried employee. You will get paid the same amount regardless of how much you work. The management and the employees who will be trying to recruit you will always allude to it being the industry standard where consultants have to work extra hours to help the clients achieve their goals. What they fail to mention is that regardless of which area you work (development, support or delivery) you are still paid for the 8/hr work day your salary dictates. So any extra work you do and billed to the client are just pure profit for the company since they do not pay you for those extra hours and will still bill the clients at the full rate.

    Which ties into the work life balance. It is non-existent. The management in charge of promotion does not care about quality of work but only quantity of work (see hours explanation above.) By doing that, they created a monstrous work culture of who-could-stay-the-latest-or-work-on-weekends. If you do not put in your 9+ hr/day. You'll get passive aggressive emails asking you to verify and resubmit your time sheet or maybe even a call from a senior manager.

    The usual career trajectory goes like this (if you stay in the company long enough.)
    Consultant for 1.5-2.5 years.
    Sr. Consultant/SME(subject matter expert) for 3+
    Manger until you quit.

    Advice to Management

    A lot of the problem falls into hiring managers from outside the company who does not understand how the software works so they over promise the clients in a way that the new hires cannot deliver. So promote from the people that you have retained over the years who actually understands the software that they are working with.

    Work to retain more talents. The company culture of overworking until you quit/get poached by clients cannot be sustained.

    Create a culture in the company that gives each employee ownership instead of dropping hot potatoes into their lap with every project.


  8. Helpful (15)

    "Consultant"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Good money and very by the book in their internal process.

    Cons

    Do NOT work for this company if you have a family and you want to start a career. You are just a number to them and they could care less about you or your time. They pay well and if you are hungry or need experience you need to get in and get out.

    A NON team environment and you really will not know who your boss is. They will through you in the deep in with no life preserver.

    They will set you up for failure and then BURN you.

    Advice to Management

    None. This company is too big to see any problems. My advice to people coming in is DON'T.


  9. Helpful (10)

    "-"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Consultant in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Senior Consultant in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Learn, grow, and then leave is a common trend here.

    Cons

    High burn out rate, poor working hours, high expectations, and low morale


  10. Helpful (11)

    "Bare Minimum Consulting, 95% Software Mending"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Consultant
    Current Employee - Consultant
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    -Pay comparable to market for duties/responsibilities, though on the low side for solid engineering/CS majors
    -Young, smart, talented coworkers who are largely friendly, though not very social
    -Opportunities for advancement, if you are willing to work the hours (10+/day) and, most importantly, actually want to be doing the extremely technical software work
    -You can sometimes schedule sick days like vacation (necessary, because vacation days are few)
    -Growing tech company who has a fairly dominant market share
    -Job security (the retention rate is low, so they need to keep as many employees as possible)
    -Recently acquired by Silver Lake (PE firm) and they have a strong track record of growing tech companies
    -A majority of the directors/executives have varied industry/regulatory experience, allowing them to have a finger on the pulse of the energy industry, companies, and regulatory environment
    -There is a month long training upon starting as a Consultant, where you learn the basics of SQL, Crystal Reports, and C++ (this should be an indication of the work you will be doing all day)

    Cons

    CULTURE
    Put simply, there is no culture. People come in, sit down at their computers, and work for 9+ hours. It is not uncommon for people to exchange no more than 20 sentences over the course of a day. There are very few (~2/year) corporate events, including community involvement. The apparent attempt to compensate for this is to have 'team' happy hours every 3/4 months (the enjoyment attained from this is heavily dependent on your team composition). If you enjoy a minimal degree of camaraderie or vibrancy or social interaction, you will likely find this company rather depressing.

    WORK
    Unless you are an extremely technical person (generally engineering or CS majors), you will almost definitely not enjoy the work. A rough estimate would show that 75% of people outside those majors leave with a year or two, at most (and scramble to positions that utilize their interests and abilities). When you are expected to bill a minimum of 9 hours a day (in an atmosphere of minimal social interactions), enjoying your work is imperative. There are three possible roles for a Consultant when they come out of training (you are assigned and your preferences generally do not matter because they put you wherever they need a body, regardless of your interests or proficiency). This latter point is important because there is virtually no training beyond the first month, resulting in most new Consultants struggling to keep their head above water for 6+ months. The Development teams do the more intense code fixes (generally CS majors, unless you have an extreme interest in being in code all day). The Support teams are the majority of the new hires. They are given an endless stream of issues in the software, which they spend all day querying databases, scrolling through code, and emailing more knowledgable resources trying to fix. The Delivery teams go to client sites (projects can take from one month to over two years), sit in a conference room, and try to set up the clients data in the software. Regardless of the position, you will be spending 9+ hours every day in the code, the software applications, or the databases.

    RETENTION
    Quorum struggles to keep employees. Of a recent group of six new hires, all were gone in slightly over a year. This is especially important because it takes about six months for a new Consultant to be able to do his job with any degree of proficiency. The learning curve is very steep, resulting in an employee of four years being as valuable in terms of productivity as about 5-10 employees of one year. Recently, there has been a fairly large exodus of employees with 4-8 years of experience. Quorum's solution has been to move unprepared Consultants onto teams that have too much work with extremely unrealistic deadlines, resulting in frustration and exit from both employees and clients.

    MISC
    -No emphasis whatsoever on work-life balance
    -Commitment is shown by hours worked, not productivity
    -Internal structure is weak, so internal processes are either overly burdensome or nonexistent
    -Constant attempts to take on new projects (ex: moving to web-based applications), without taking the time to seriously fix the structural issues is the code
        - Resulting in a patchwork of coverups and little consistency in the application's processes or GUI

    Advice to Management

    -Create a culture that people want to be a part of (maybe Silver Lake can help here)
    -Do not attempt to recruit business/liberal arts majors without being excruciatingly clear on the day-to-day work of employees (maybe change the job title from Consultant to something that better matches the duties)
    -Give your more senior employees (anyone with 3+ years of experience) whatever they want (money, vacation, competent assistance) to stop them from leaving
    -Fix the code before you try to add fancier features
    -Do not be so distant from your employees; regularly go to the offices and talk with the employees and actually get a feel for the sentiments permeating the workplace
        - Address the concerns!

    If these issues aren't resolved, Quorum will continue to lose people (even more), the teams will be overloaded with work (even more), the products will suffer (even more), clients will leave (even more), and the company will fail.

    The future could be bright for Quorum, but not if these longstanding issues continue to be ignored.


  11. Helpful (7)

    "Good experience, high turnover"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Consultant in Austin, TX
    Current Employee - Consultant in Austin, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Quorum Business Solutions, Inc. (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Get experience in oil and gas and technology. Responsibilities early on. Training program. Young workplace.

    Cons

    No company culture or work-life balance. Always an abundance of work because of the high turnover and inexperience of workers in the company. Most people leave within 2-4 years at best, the rest of the company has been there 10 plus years.

    Advice to Management

    Give something back to your employees



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