RDX Reviews | Glassdoor

RDX Reviews

Updated April 22, 2017
50 reviews

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2.7
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27 Ratings

50 Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (14)

    "Well Deserved Reputation of 3 Star Workplace"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Former DOC Member/Trainer/Float Tasks in Warrendale, PA
    Former Employee - Former DOC Member/Trainer/Float Tasks in Warrendale, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at RDX full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Please note: this review applies strictly to the Operations segment of RDX, and predominantly to the Database Operations Center at that - not to the sales segment. Please refer to other reviews for an idea of what you're getting into there.

    - Good comraderie among peers

    - Salaried positions with average to above average opportunities for raises and promotions

    - Strong knowledge base at the DBA level

    - FANTASTIC learning opportunity for entry level IT workers (who will come in as DOC members.) This is one of the reasons I rate this organization as high as I do. You WILL NOT GET the level of insight from some of the best minds in the business anywhere else.

    Cons

    - The DOC and it's policies have been in a constant state of flux - if you look back in the reviews, you will find this to be the case since at least 2010.

    - Expectations for "billable hours" was ridiculous when I worked there, and probably still is. Work for the DOC was always feast or famine, and when its a famine, you had better be an extremely competitive individual, or you WILL NOT survive in this organization. I made a good number of sacrifices in this department, and regret doing so. Only the STRONG, KNOWLEDGE THIRSTY, AMBITIOUS can thrive in this department of the organization - and you will see this to be the case at all levels when you get to interact with enough people.

    - The organization is highly political, which causes some people to be on edge - it is hard to predict when the next round of cuts will be (there were about 3 of those when I worked there, and that was only over a year and a half.)

    - Technical Documentation was terrible when I was there. Conflicts between escalations (even from one paragraph to the next), incomplete instructions, non-updated contacts, etc. From the reviews I've read, it still is this way. To be fair, it has been awhile, and it may be somewhat better at this point -- however from what I'm seeing below, you would be wise to heed this potential "issue" going into the DOC especially, because if you screw anything up, consequences tend to be very severe. (Unless you are your supervisor's favorite, which also happened a lot while I was working here. Protip: sucking up is not always such a bad thing if you want to keep a job here. Protip 2: You WILL screw up at some point, if you're doing anything. It happens to all techs, no matter how good they are.)

    - There were technical challenges when trying to get into clients' environments on a relatively consistent basis, and if something bad can happen to your favorite VM player, it probably will. Or some other jerk will be using it when it's the only one you CAN use to get into your client's environment. You will need to be a strong team player to overcome this issue.

    Advice to Management

    If your business model works, it works. And it seems to be working in general. However:

    * There were questions asked of me regarding morale of the DOC while I worked there. The reality is that it had less to do with mid-level management and more to do with immediate supervisors, which was part of the hesitation. Favorites got played a lot, promises were broken, supervisors' morale (often times low) would seep to the bottom of the pile. It would be a good idea to encourage and promote your low-level managers, ensure that they are where they need to be at, and ensure that they are communicating effectively with their underlings, rather than JUST tearing them down when things go awry. Constructive criticism is good, but managers with poor morale make for bottom rung workers with poor morale, so tread a little easier on them and address any issues which come up between those two levels quickly.

    * FIX EVERY FREAKIN' BIT OF THE DOCUMENTATION, and also make it easier for those who are qualified to fix it TO fix it. This cannot be emphasized enough if you want there to be fewer discrepancies in your investigations! It also looks like there might be communication discrepancies between Warrendale and North Carolina - that's a whole new layer of complication which wasn't there when I was. Have fun sorting that one out - especially since it still needs fixing at HQ!

    * The monitoring software still had a few bugs upon my departure. I'm not sure if this is still an issue or not, but if false flags are still occurring, it could be looked into.


  2. Helpful (7)

    "Garbage Company"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Database Operations Center Specialist in Warrendale, PA
    Former Employee - Database Operations Center Specialist in Warrendale, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at RDX full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Will gain necessary experience to get a real job at a good company.

    Cons

    The management is terrible. When i started they told us that we would get a raise when we passed the tests to move to tier 2 and tier 3 DOC Specialist. As soon as training was over and i was on the job i was informed that they no longer give you the tier 2 raise. Also there were new hires coming in constantly that were being paid more than people who had been there for a year or longer. I started at 35,000 per year and the new hires that started 2 months AFTER me were being paid 38,000. Their "Wiki" ,which is their documentation for their clients, is awful. Most of the information in the documentation is out of date or just incorrect. Good luck getting any weekend days off. It's all around a terrible company. I would recommend only working here for 6-8 months and then moving on.

    Advice to Management

    Respect the members in the DOC more than you currently do. Realize that "Database Operations Center" is a glorified name for help desk and realize that without that help desk the DBAs would drown in issues.


  3. Helpful (9)

    "Paralegal"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Paralegal in White Plains, NY
    Former Employee - Paralegal in White Plains, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at RDX full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Nothing, nothing, nothing, nothing, nothing.

    Cons

    Puppets, incompetent, rude, incredulous, disgusting.

    Advice to Management

    Get a new day job.


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  5. Helpful (19)

    "Not worth the stress"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - DOC in Warrendale, PA
    Former Employee - DOC in Warrendale, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at RDX full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    - The ability to watch netflix on shift
    - Salaried position with overtime
    - Experience
    - First month of training
    - Building and surrounding are pleasent and modern
    - Co-workers for the most part are awesome
    - Use Service Now as a ticketing system which is the best ticketing system currently available
    -cafeteria

    Cons

    - Salary was pitiful when i worked there, pitiful for pennsylvania in general and abysmal when you consider you're basically working in Cranberry Township where employees at the A+ gas station down the street probably make more than you.

    - High stress environment
    While it's ironic to say that a place that lets you watch netflix while working can be high stress. This is indeed the case. It's easy to get overwhelmed with tickets and the truth of the matter is if you get a ticket you can't handle it's your fault and you're just going to have to struggle with it until it's fixed. In addition to this the time for the shifts should be changed seeing as how about 20-30 minutes before night shift would end, a flood of tickets would come in often being the reason for us staying later then we should.

    -Burnout is a real issue, work life balance is none existent.
    At about the midway point of my time at RDX, my life consisted of working at rdx about 9-9.5 hours a day, sleep for 6-8 and then getting about 3 hours of time to myself and repeating the cycle. It was far from living, and my work life balance was pathetic.

    -The amount of hours you spend at this company
    Working more than 8 hours is often expected and is more than just a regular occurrence here. While the extra money was nice, putting in between 84-90 hours every two weeks is beyond draining and often lead to the feeling of being burnt out.

    -"RDX Magic Numbers"
    This is what the DOC members calls the process in which RDX comes up with what you're supposed to be paid. The finance department regularly messes up how much you should receive (and never in your favor) and it often leads to visit to the finance department to get you paycheck straighten out. One time in particular, RDX forgot to pay out the differential for working 2nd and 3rd shift, leading to roughly 30 employees missing out on 50-75 dollars. Also due to the effect of the magic numbers, you never get paid what you expected to get paid which is infuriating. The way they calculate a paycheck is beyond ridiculous and nobody in the DOC knows how it's calculated. I've had friends who were accountants try to decipher a RDX paycheck and they couldn't figure it out.

    -Having both friday and saturdays off is seen as a perk only for DBA's and upper management
    It was basically said to us we were not allowed to have both days off and that's a right reserved for when you become a DBA

    -The amount of PTO days is low and includes sick days
    Having only 11 days for a whole year, in addition to not having Saturday or Friday off meant i used most of my PTO days just trying to live a normal life. Lets not count that these PTO days also include sick days.

    -Being late is a no no
    While normally this may sound like complaining. when 80% of the company lives more than 45 minutes away, you would think they would provide some leeway in this matter. Or at least pay us enough to actually afford housing in cranberry.

    - They really do lie to you about the job description
    As mentioned below, this truly is a help desk position with a specialization in databases. Truth of the matter is i wrote more lines of SQL in the first week of my new position (and it wasn't even DBA related) then i ever did at this job. They often claimed that nobody writes their own SQL anymore and everybody just gets there SQL off the internet. Which after being in the real world, this was a bold faced lie. More of a excuse so they can have us running the same 5 premade queries over and over again without questioning. Also, When i left here i was no better off at being a DBA then when i started. I didn't even put the world DBA on my resume.

    - Carrot on a stick mentality
    Becoming a top of the world RDX DBA is the goal here and RDX OFTEN parades around this imagery and hope of you one day becoming a DBA. While in the pre hiring phase telling you all you have to do is pass a few test and you will get the money and title of DBA. This was so far from the truth and one of the main reasons why i left the company. Truth of the matter is you can easily pass the test, that's not the issue. The issue is that simply passing the test doesn't immediately make you a DBA and/or give you DBA money (which is how HR made it seem over the phone). In truth, you will take the test and pass it and still have to sit in the DOC for at least a year due to rarity that a DBA opening occurs. Then once a opening does happen, numerous other members of the DOC have passed the test and have been waiting in line for a DBA position just like you. So there's essentially a backlog of people that have been in the DOC and waiting to become a dba. There are people that have been in the doc since 2014 and still waiting for a DBA position. When i left this job it came down to the options of studying for the test, passing it (1 month) and waiting on a DBA position (1 year after factoring in the chances of a dba position happening and the people in front of me that were already waiting for an opening) all while making peanuts. or cut my loses and find a new job that will pay me good money now. I took the latter.

    *Also of note, becoming a DBA for RDX is also not something to strive for. DBA's at RDX get paid peanuts in relation to other company DBA's and RDX also forces you into a two year contract in which your salary is locked in stone and once the contract is finished they have a clause where you can't work for any company that's a customer for them making finding new employment difficult. Also, being a DBA here is borderline torture. There were some days we would come to work finding out DBA's had just up and walked out on the company due to working conditions, not even having established a new job.

    -You reach a ceiling on learning fast
    Admittedly, They make this clear to you in training. But after about two months , there is literally nothing else left to learn. This was also a big reason why i left. Having a hard defined cap on your learning (and then the learning you do accomplish not really being that significant) Is borderline career suicide. I would make the case that staying in the DOC more than 1 year is flat out dangerous to your career and its growth.

    Truth be told, i could go on and on about this place. From the room being dirty (found a toenail on the floor one day) and super cold 24/7 (then they had the nerve to ban hoodies) overall my time at this place was absolutely horrific. But even with that being said, after being able to put RDX on my resume i admittedly got calls from places that wouldn't even consider me coming out of college and ended up doubling my salary as a result. Its sad that in leaving i often felt bad for my co workers… not because i was leaving them in such a terrible environment as is usually the case when leaving a bad job. Instead i felt much more sad in the fact that so many of my co worker were so complacent working here. Not realizing that there are companies that actually care about there employees. Companies that are willing to give you more than 11 pto days and companies that don't see having the weekend off as a “perk”.

    If you do decide to take the plunge and work here. Give yourself a deadline…. Mines was 6 months.

    Advice to Management

    Switch the schedule to four 10 hour days would solve most of my problems with this job. The feeling of being burnt out eventually warps your whole perception of RDX. You start to hate everything about the company and come to despise even showing up for work. Four ten hour shifts would make the feeling of being burnt out diminished. Almost every other help desk does 4 tens so RDX should take note.

    In addition to the above, you have all the resources to create a DBA academia, so why not do it? You have 50 DBA’s on payroll, why not hold weekly classes to enhance the DOC’s understanding of DBA concepts? The current model of having DBA classes every day during training, then being thrown in the DOC and forgotten about is unacceptable. One of the biggest reason for my departure is because i wasn't learning new things and growth wasn't happening.

    Also if you're going to be located in cranberry, pay a cranberry salary.


  6. Helpful (22)

    "Tread Lightly"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - DOC in Warrendale, PA
    Current Employee - DOC in Warrendale, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at RDX full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    I have met some very smart and good people here. Also, there are many buzzwords you can add to a resume after spending a few months here and gain exposure to unfamiliar environments and technology.

    Cons

    Where to start? When I came in for the interview and training process, I thought the building was modern and really cool looking and that everyone had such nice desks. What I didn’t know until the third week of training is that I would not get a desk on the first floor, but that I would be working in a window-less, damp, and dirty room known as, “The DOC”. By the time it was clear to me that this job posting is extremely misleading and I was lied to about my salary and benefits I had been working there for six weeks. The people that run this company are taking advantage of new college grads and others looking for a new career in technology as these people are generally uninformed about tech careers and what should be expected. The job posting was for, “entry level DBA”, however, nothing I did at my job was actual DBA work. It is really a help desk that specializes in databases. People that work this position are usually the first ones to fall on the sword, regardless of if they took the correct action to resolve a problem with penalties including termination. The documentation for client environments and escalation procedures leaves techs completely blind when handling issues. Conflicting information is found in one sentence to the next leaving techs to make a judgement call as to what action to take. Hundreds of tickets were created to have documentation updated, but in most cases nothing would be done. The password vault stores information that follows no naming conventions (a client will be labeled under a different name in every resource tool) and the majority of information is irrelevant or accounts would be locked out by another tech and you would be left to trial-and-error to gain access to alerting servers. The monitoring systems did not function properly with techs routinely having several hundred alerts in their name that were all false positives. The management was coached to give the same answers in regards to questions asked by techs like some strange, Stepford Wives, brainwashing had occurred leaving techs without an honest answer. When a tech would ask a valid question to management, it was usually met with a temper tantrum, finger pointing, and punishment for the tech. Management approached certain senior techs to find out why morale was so low. When a few techs gave honest answers, they were punished, put under intense scrutiny and labeled as the problem with the department. Much of the management and even senior management at the top of the company were the butt of jokes and made themselves out to be complete buffoons on a regular basis. One manager would frequently send out emails and prepare documents that were full of typos. Another spent a whole day with a tech and wrote an email to the company about his experience and continuously referenced the person by the wrong name. Some DBAs would be extremely rude and even cruel to some techs by publicly shaming them with emails addressed to the entire company about how an issue was not resolved to their preference. It appeared that no one in this company was happy at all and people would take out their frustrations on their subordinates. The general theme to the company seemed to be to pass the buck by not taking action or responsibility and blaming things on another shift or department or letting someone else clean up when things went wrong. When people would try to gracefully leave the company RDX would burn bridges by threatening to sue, or even calling the employees new company and trying to have them fired. Some employees have been at RDX for 5 years and are still making less than new graduates at entry-level jobs for other companies and about half of what a person with their experience should be making. It seems that the majority of people are now looking to get out of the company due to increasing premiums on healthcare costs on top of the poor salaires. One person calculated that they were making less than someone working fast food after expense of the below average healthcare was taken out of their check.

    Advice to Management

    This section is normally used as advice to management, but there is no advice that can be given to management that would make them do a 180 and be good at their jobs. The only advice I can give is to a person thinking about applying, or that has already applied. Here are two items to remember. 1) Get everything that HR says to you in your contract when you're hired. I was told I would get things and I found out that I was lied to. 2) Do not buy in to the belief that you will be a DBA here. You wouldn't want to be a DBA here anyway. There are only a handful of people in the DOC that want to be a DBA out of the 50 plus employees. The rest are on their way out. If you do take a job here, this isn't a place for a career. Use this as a tool to get experience on your resume and get out. I met several smart people here with the majority moving on to better jobs outside the company. I've heard new techs say the want to quit after being on the job three days after training. DOC workers are completely mislead about aspects of their job and you could see it on their faces when reality hit. Many would become apathetic, scramble for a new job, while others no call/no show. The life expectancy for the DOC is no more than 9 months on average. If you do accept a position in the DOC at RDX, make sure you are in the majority and get out ASAP so you can get a real start to your life and career.


  7. Helpful (4)

    "RDX is great"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Sales in Warrendale, PA
    Current Employee - Sales in Warrendale, PA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at RDX (More than a year)

    Pros

    I've been working within the sales organization at RDX for a year or so, and it's a great company to work for. The office is nice, everyone is friendly, and sales efforts are going great. The cafeteria is amazing too. RDX is using the latest / greatest technologies for outbound sales efforts, so I've learned quite a bit about sales since I've been here.

    Cons

    It would be nice to have more coaching / career development


  8. Helpful (15)

    "A Strange Place"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Doc Specialist in Charlotte, NC
    Former Employee - Doc Specialist in Charlotte, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at RDX (Less than a year)

    Pros

    There are friendly people that work in our office. Some are very smart, helpful and were quick to learn everything that was thrown at us.

    Our coworkers in the Pittsburg office were friendly and willing to give a helping hand, they will go out of there way to give advice, test accounts for us, walk us through new and challenging problems. The team leads in Pittsburg are also helpful, you could tell that some of them cared about making sure the clients were happy and that we do things by the book.

    The building and office space were very nice, although parking is a bit annoying. It's easy to get to the office from the interstate.

    The job isnt too hard, and it will look good on a resume if you decide to not stay with RDX.

    Cons

    RDX is bad at planning:
    - When we got back from training, the phone system wasn't set up. We had to use cell phones from the DBAs or trainers to call clients. This happened for almost a month for some reason. The same happened with the camera and TV that wasn't used for weeks because no one set it up.
    - If you are working off-hours there is no leads in Charlotte at all. The only shift that has a team lead is first, the second and third shifts have to rely on getting help on Skype. A month ago there were no team leads in Charlotte at all. They should have had some senior people in Charlotte from the beginning.

    There are a lot of things that seem sketchy about the company as we:
    - When we went up to Pittsburg for training, we were given more paperwork basic saying that if we quit we'd get sued, instead of before we left… I was worried that I'd have to pay for a plan ride back if I didn't sign it.
    - A lot of the software seems to be pirated. The VMs we use say For Non-Commercial Use Only on the title bar and Windows on the VMs always pop up a warning telling us that Windows isn't registered.

    There's a lot of confusion everyday on the job:
    - We were in instructed to investigate every alert that came in, including the ones that were caused by our monitoring software. This has caused a few arguements between us and the workers in Pittsburg. They don't investigate every single alert and thought that were ripping of clients.
    - The documentation is very very bad. You pretty much have to rely on Pittsburg workers to help you out since they have learned which things in the wiki are wrong. Then they won't let us fix it, instead we have to create a ticket and wait for someone in Pittsburg to fix it for us.
    - Secret server is also bad, most of the time you just have to guess what account and password you use to log in.

    Advice to Management

    Fix the things in the cons sections. All of these things can be fixed to make the job easier. The job is a lot harder because of small things that could just be fixed.

    Don't lie to your new employees. They shouldn't have to find out that they have more legal paperwork to sign after you fly them to Pittsburg. Also, be honest with your clients, we shouldn't be billing them money because we investigated an alert that cleared. There's a lot of confusion between both places and there shouldn't be.

    Get some teamleads or senior specialists for all of the shifts. It's not fair to those that work after hours to not be able just ask someone for help. Yes, you can use Skype, but it's a lot easier if you are just talking to someone in person. All shifts should be treated the same and should have team leads.

    Figure out how to fix documentation. We shouldn't have to guess what to do for every client by talking to one another, it should just be written down.

    Get rid of some of the lazy people. There are a couple of people working here that barely do any work and are getting paid to be as lazy as possible. If someone has been around for months and only get an hour billable a day (sometimes less!) than get rid of them and hire someone that wants to work.


  9. Helpful (6)

    "I'm here for the long term"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - DOC Specialist II in Pittsburgh, PA
    Current Employee - DOC Specialist II in Pittsburgh, PA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    You can come into the job not knowing much about databases and RDX will take the time to teach you everything you need to succeed. There's many resources here that are willing to take the time to work with you. From DBAs to managers to some team leads, they all help you. There's classes and little seminars that DBAs will hold to go further on a topic so that we can do our job better with having the understanding of the concept of issues we get alerted on.

    There's a great team mentality in the DOC. People work together to help on issues and help each other progress through. My team lead will sit with you and make sure that you know what you're doing. He takes the time to listen to you. I've had time with the team lead on my shift and it's evident that he cares about his job and the company. If he doesn't know they answer, he always send me and others to the DOC manager who is always making sure that things are right for us. Working with the people in charge of this department is nice. When you talk to them you can tell that they care and that they care about fixing what is wrong. You don't feel that you're just being brushed off, you get the feeling that they doing something for you.

    This is a place that I love coming into work for. It's almost like going back to school for being a DBA. Some of the DBAs should be teachers based on what they know. I'm glad to be apart of this team and hope to make my DBA career here.

    Cons

    Pay could be a little higher, but it's good for entry level with a bigger return on the DBA team. 24 - 7 can be rough in the DOC. Changes happen, and at times it doesn't seem like the company lets us know in the best of time are times. The main issue is that it gets old hearing people complain about the smallest things, and just to complain. Working with "kids" is annoying. They don't understand the concept of work really is. They don't get that you have to work hard to move up. Some of the people act like they deserve something extra just for doing their job. It's hard to take just listening to this during turnover. This is one of the reasons that I have almost quit. I've learned to block out the cry babies and do my job.

    Advice to Management

    Stay the same way you are. I can only speak about the DOC. People see what you're doing and like the direction of the department. Keep the open door policy there, it's nice to know that I am able to talk to the ones in charge.

    If you could have the DBAs spend more time in the DOC and talk to us we can have a better understanding with some issues that we get paged on.

    Please find away to stop the babies from crying, it's distracting for the job. Make sure the team lead knows his shift can change someone's mood just coming into the company, or for the next shift. Maybe if you let the others know that their attitudes of acting like a brat is affecting others they may change.


  10. Helpful (4)

    "From junior, mid and senior, a great place to work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - SQL Server Database Administrator in Warrendale, PA
    Current Employee - SQL Server Database Administrator in Warrendale, PA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at RDX full-time

    Pros

    * The ability for IT-capable people to learn a new profession as DOC specialists, and learn it well, from some of the best DBAs around.

    * Challenges presented from a variety of client environments ranging from small "Mom and Pop" companies that operate on shoe-string budgets and out-of-life-cycle DBMSs to giant, technology savvy, well funded corporations that bleed on the cutting edge of technology.

    * Camaraderie of employees working throughout shared experiences in an environment where knowledge is openly shared, assistance can always been found from a co-worker and a relatively relaxed work environment.

    * Continuous growth of the company, moving forward from a small shop 20 years ago, into a well-respected standard in the remote services industry.

    Cons

    * Workload assignment - with continuous growth as a company, being able to hire and promote from within becomes a challenge to make sure that the high standards of the company is reflected in their newly hired DBAs. The burden of growth falls onto the shoulders of the current employees and can stretch them thin at times, including a potential increase to the workload of on-call DBAs.

    * Disconnects between departments - the communication between the DB delivery departments (Oracle, MSSQL, Oracle Apps, etc) and the DOC monitoring teams could be improved greatly. Improved accountability by individuals and departments for shortcomings would be welcomed, although current internal reporting structures between departments should help erase the communication gaps hopefully.

    * Not exactly setting the world on fire with the cost/coverage of health benefits.

    Advice to Management

    The reason I'm even posting this is because Glassdoor has become the repository for all terminated and/or employees to air their grievances with their perceived persecution without having an idea of how the company actually runs. More power to them - they're entitled to their opinions. Based on what I've seen in the last few months of posts, they're completely incorrect opinions, but opinions nonetheless.

    But it sure is rather unfortunate that some of the former employees have forgotten what has brought them to this point.

    They've forgotten that they were librarians, bartenders, line cooks and unemployed college graduates whenever RDX gave them a chance to become a top notch DBA, or even teaching them the basics of DBMSs so they can leverage that knowledge elsewhere, somewhere they would have never gotten any consideration without that teaching.

    They've conveniently forgotten that whenever they were up at 3AM on a Saturday morning working on an emergency production-down critical on-call ticket, they were honing their skills to be able to leave RDX and command a job and salary that'll make them happy for the rest of their lives, God allowing.

    They've forgotten that they're entrusted with the livelihood of every single client's environment, and whenever you do something that could jeopardize their environments' integrity, you may not have what it takes to be employed by RDX, or any responsible company, for that matter.

    They've forgotten that RDX is a business. There are standards, there are procedures, there are highs and lows, and there is accountability. If you take too many vacations days when you leave for another job 4 days into a billing cycle, you're going to have to account for that and your minuscule final paycheck. If you violate policies for the very relaxed dress code, there are repercussions; this is a place of business after all. If you view your job as a way to only socialize, and never do any tangible work, then maybe you shouldn't be surprised whenever its suggested that you find a new place of employment.

    Yes - the hours can be long, the pressures and demands of the job can be daunting, and frankly, the health benefits are pretty horrible. A certain type of personality thrives at RDX - outgoing, personable, accountable, a continual thirst for knowledge and striving to be better. Not everyone has it. But what I can tell you is that you're not going to find a better group of people to not only bail you out of your current database problems, you're not going to find a better group of people to guide, teach and grow willing junior, mid-level and senior resources into something extraordinary.


  11. Helpful (18)

    "Started out great. Changes made it worse."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - DOC in Warrendale, PA
    Former Employee - DOC in Warrendale, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    -No experience needed for DOC
    -Training is provided
    -You are exposed to many different environments which is good for your resume
    -Vacation/holiday time is great (as long as you're not in the DOC)
    -Some DBAs are very helpful

    Cons

    Where do I begin?

    Turnover is high.

    Morale is at an all time low, and management doesn't seem to care. They would rather have issues go away rather than fix them. The DOC is treated terribly. You are the first line of defense, and have MANY responsibilities. You can handle 99 of 100 issues perfectly, and you will be remembered for that one mistake you made. All you need to do is walk through any DBA team area (specifically SQL) and hear the DBAs making fun of a specialist for an issue they couldn't resolve.

    Communication is terrible between teams, and when something is dropped it conveniently falls on the DOC somehow. Team Leads actively talk negatively about the company during shift, play games on their phones, and leave the DOC room for long periods of time leaving the shift specialists to make judgement calls.

    Pay is low, both for DOC and DBAs.

    The software that you are expected to use day to day doesn't function properly. The wiki documentation is terrible, and RDX seems to act like it is not an issue.

    One of my first memories was a manager telling us to "not go on glassdoor and bash the company". I don't believe the negative reviews are people bashing the company, they are simply speaking on their experiences which happened to be negative.

    Advice to Management

    Treat your employees well. Don't treat them as a number, but as an asset. Too many good people leave the company because they are mistreated. Address issues rather than sweep them under the rug.


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