REI Systems Reviews in Herndon, VA | Glassdoor

REI Systems Herndon Reviews

3 reviews

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Herndon, VA

1.0
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REI Systems President & CEO Veer Bhartiya
Veer Bhartiya
3 Ratings

3 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Nice workplace environment, flexible hours (does not mean less work) (in 14 reviews)

  • Best workplace environment, flexible work hours (in 9 reviews)

Cons
  • After all this hard work also, do not expect recognition unless you have out of office friendship with managers (in 5 reviews)

  • Why would anyone want to work with such people (in 3 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (8)

    "Cheap labor."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Herndon, VA
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Herndon, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at REI Systems full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Nice facility with some very knowledgeable technical team members who are helpful. You can learn a lot while you are here. Very hands on.

    Cons

    Their salaries are well below industry average. I head people left got raises of 20K + in other companies when they left. I experienced this myself when I left the company. There are fewer americans and the companies has a lot of bound labor on visas.

    Advice to Management

    You have little idea how your managers treat employees


  2. Helpful (6)

    "Worst Company to work For!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Developer in Herndon, VA
    Former Employee - Developer in Herndon, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at REI Systems full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    A growing company with many project

    Cons

    Totally under staffed and real inexperienced management. Most of the line managers are from India with hardly any American work experience or knowledge of US labor laws.

    At the time of interview, they will be really nice to you but when you actually start working for them, they will expect you to work every night as well as weekends. These managers will not ask you if you are busy during he nights or weekends, they will simply tell you that you need to get the work done during nights or weekends. No apology for asking you to work during the nights or weekends, they will simply require you to work when the managers want.

    Advice to Management

    Hire professional managers with American experience. make sure they have the knowledge of local labor laws. This company can do really well if the Top management tries to actually find out why so many good people leave this company. It is not if but when someone will sue them for forcing employees to work for 16 hours a day but paying only for 8 hours a day. This is a very unprofessional company.

  3. Helpful (9)

    "Average at best. If you're competent at what you do, you have far better options."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Herndon, VA
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Herndon, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    * Very flexible office hours, you can come and go as you please as long as you get things done (with some managers).
    * Good medical benefits for the company size.
    * There are a few people in the company who are great at what they do. If you end up working there, find out who they are and stick with them; your life will be easier.

    Cons

    * Pays about 5-10k less than the average for software development positions in this area. The main figures on this site might be padded towards the high end, but you'll find out for sure if they make you an offer.
    * More fear with new technologies than innovation, and it leads to a lot of wasted effort in development and testing.
    * Falling behind with "cutting edge" technology. They're currently moving to .NET 3.5, but hardly anyone knows the framework and most are still programming from a non-OO perspective.
    * Project managers were promoted from senior development positions, and are lacking the interpersonal skills to do their jobs properly. They don't seem to read up on management or software books (or read far too many bad ones), as they often use catch phrases that sound good, but are effectively meaningless to the workers and don't help get anything done. They get angry at workers when deadlines slip (even if it isn't their fault), instead of just dealing with the situation professionally and working with the resources they have.
    * Some of the QA's think that giving you a hundred defect issues with one piece of information each is better than giving you ten issues with defects grouped logically. Leads to wasted time, frustration, and less work actually getting done.
    * Things are usually rushed, and code-quality practices are non-existent when deadlines come up. It's the type of environment where firefighting has taken precedence over most everything else.
    * Don't let HR glaze over the hours worked while you're interviewing, ask about it. When deadlines come up people are working late nights and weekend hours for 1-2 months before releases, which can happen every 4-6 months.
    * They've promoted technical people who don't have the skills for their position titles. I had a technical lead on a .NET 3.5 project who was supposedly "senior", but didn't know how to use LINQ, program with generics, or use partial classes with T4.

    (Also, the awards listed on glassdoor for this company are misleading. Those are actually for "Recreational Equipment (REI)", not "REI Systems Inc.")

    Advice to Management

    * Potential employees couldn't care less what you do if you're offering lower salaries. Pay people at least the average for this area, and you can start attracting better talent to your workforce.

    * You have employees who are visibly sitting on YouTube all day long and don't really do anything. This makes your threats laughable and demotivates workers who actually contribute. If you got rid of these people you might be able to afford to pay the productive people more and your workers would take you seriously when you have meetings on improvement.

    * You're long overdue for an upgrade in the skills of your workforce. Either find some way to get the existing ones to learn the .NET framework and solid OO principles, or replace them with people who are already at that level.


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