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Relativity

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Relativity

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Relativity Senior Manager Reviews

Updated Sep 29, 2021

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Found 8 of over 373 reviews

4.3
100%
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Relativity CEO Mike Gamson
Mike Gamson
2 Ratings

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What people are saying about Relativity

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Big Law

1m

an 

Associate

Q about billing for the bowl: do y’all bill for back and forths with the relativity folks, for example, or for back and forths with outside legal services folks? Currently lead associate handling logistics on transcription services and it’s like herding cats. Technically what I’m doing isn’t “law related” but the services provided are helping our case. Same question but for overseeing our paralegal. Do you bill for managing them and making sure they stay on top of their work?

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Ratings by Demographics

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  1. 5.0
    Current Employee

    Amazing

    Dec 16, 2020 - Senior Manager 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Collaborative work environment with a strong emphasis on inclusion and diversity

    Cons

    Fast-paced environment may not be for everyone

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  2. 4.0
    Current Employee, more than 5 years

    Great place to work

    Sep 29, 2021 - IT Senior Manager 
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Excellent employee support, enthusiastic executives (Mike G), opportunities for growth and remote work highly supported.

    Cons

    Company is bringing in a lot of new hires, some execs do not know the industry. Sharp learning curve for them. Legal is a bottleneck but trying to dig their way out.

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  3. 3.0
    Former Employee, more than 1 year

    Young, high-tech, energetic enviornment

    Oct 3, 2019 - Senior PM in Chicago, IL
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Compensation and benefits are good, casual work environment

    Cons

    Cutthroat competitive environment, senior management is an old school boys club

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    5 people found this review helpful

    Relativity Response

    Chief People Officer

    Thank you for sharing your experience and feedback on these matters. It’s certainly disheartening to hear that you did not feel valued in the workplace as that goes against Relativity’s Core Values and vision as an employer. We are continuing to prioritize development of our leaders, reduction of bias and making sure we have a consistently inclusive environment throughout our company, especially between managers and their teams. To the extent we are aware of non-inclusive habits occurring, we are committed to changing that. While there isn’t an overnight fix, we are working tirelessly to implement more inclusive programming. As for lacking diversity in senior management, that is philosophically and literally the opposite of our vision and our direction. Our goal is for all Relativians to feel included and valued, and that they receive credit and rewards for their own impressive contributions. This year and in the future, we will continue to invest in Community Resource Groups, I&D meet-ups, and hiring from diverse pools of top talent – particularly at the management level. Thank you again for voicing your concerns so we can continue to make Relativity a more inclusive place to work. –Dorie Blesoff, Chief People Officer

  4. 5.0
    Former Employee, more than 5 years

    Engineering Manager

    Oct 10, 2018 - Senior Manager in Chicago, IL
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    If you want to be where the growth is, this is the place to be. Rapid growth, plenty of opportunities if you're a go-getter. In the middle of transformation from on prem software to SaaS, very fascinating time to be part of. Amazing HR support for Learning & Development, and the company puts focus on strengthening Diversity and Inclusion. I'm a working mom who had 2 kids during my tenure there, and was still able to grow my career at an amazing pace. This is a solid proof of how supportive this company is of its employees. Leadership is coached closely to pay close attention to employees career growth and motivation, which is a refreshing departure from the usual solely result driven management style you see elsewhere.

    Cons

    Relativity is an ambitious company but can definitely do more ruthless prioritization. Focusing on too many things could cause confusion and misalignment at times. Moving fast could also mean that some opinions / inputs get ignored for the sake of making decisions faster.

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    14 people found this review helpful
  5. 3.0
    Former Employee, more than 1 year

    Once & Future greatness at this firm

    Nov 4, 2018 - Senior Manager in Chicago, IL
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    PROS: + Great people + Best office space ever + Pretty flat org chart + Liberal WFH policy + Good hardware / software choices & desks + The boutique player in a niche market + Not yet public Not for everyone, as evidenced by the incredible range of opinions here, as well as by the fairly high turnover rate for employees. I can relate because this is one of the coolest places I’ve ever worked and one of the most frustrating. Relativity thinks of itself as entrepreneurial tech startup with a Midwestern (Chicago) flare, and in many ways that’s the TL;DR. At nearly 800 people it’s starting to feel the growing pains of typical companies at this stage in their development. The bright and visionary founder & CEO can (and does) change courses with the wind, and will expect the company to follow suit at light speed. Relativity is very deliberate about their culture including one not listed directly in their hallowed core values: A culture of feedback. This is so much a part of the company that many of the older critiques listed by others seem to describe a company other than the one I currently work for, proof that the company has heard the complaints and acted on them. Examples: • Complaint: Work From Home (WFH) is discouraged, frowned upon, etc. o Actuality: On any given day, it seems half the company is WFH. On my own team of 18 people, I had 7 people that worked remotely more often than in the office. • Complaint: Lack of diversity amongst employees o Actuality: I’ve worked in a huge public university system, the US Government, a manufacturer, and trading firms, and this is the most diverse place I’ve worked in forty years. Also, they define “diversity” quite broadly. It’s a true strength of the firm. Research suggests that firms either “talk about diversity”, or live it. Relativity lives it, but I am a little worried because of late, they’ve begun to talk about it as well.  • Complaint: “Amateur hour”. o Actuality: I had to laugh at this one a bit because I get it. Where other tech firms want to hire the smartest guy in the room; Relativity will only make room for that person if he / she (I am paraphrasing the company owner) “is not a ” […~jerk]. Rather, they hire smart, motivated people who appreciate & live the core values, and provide an environment where they can succeed. Some fresh grads, others industry vets. The Chicago HQ has the coolest office spaces I’ve ever been in (much less worked in): Every desk is adjustable to stand or sit; they provide great hardware & software for employees; there are deep window sills you can actually sit on, or put your teams books or cool artifacts on; four “break-out areas” on each of the four floors and several “pantries” stocked with fresh fruit, soft-drinks, tea & coffee and tons of VC enabled conference rooms and large training areas. The main cafeteria has ping-pong, old school video games and there’s a “Zen room” for napping ( / meditating / …). What you won’t see are hard (desktop) phones. IT encourages the use of one or more soft-phone applications instead, with mixed results. The building is remodeling the lobby so there are issues with badging in, hopefully soon to be resolved. Hopefully they bring some of the restaurants back too. There’s a 23rd floor rooftop deck and a gym with a $50 lifetime membership The people are awesome; particularly the C* level folks, each of them extremely driven, competent, and yet very approachable. The individual contributors too, to a person, are very helpful, positive, hard-working, and thirsty for knowledge and success.

    Cons

    CONS: - Thinly staffed compared to expectations of growth, change - Long & risky onboarding times - Extremely fast rate of change, often for change’s sake, often without breathing to see if the last change actually worked - Obsession with metrics: often inaccurate, duplicative, and contradictory - Very high turnover, and not everyone leaves of their own accord It’s the middle management that needs help: the Director / Sr. Manager folks need to find time to talk to each other it seems. Anecdotes: • I got an email / text / call from a Director (or higher) complaining that a square on “the dashboard” is red, or the number too high (or low). What dashboard, you may ask? I did. I was pointed to one I had not known about, nor had my team been told about it, trained on it, or had any input in creating it. This was not a one off, but happened at least a half-dozen times with different dashboards (in one case a spreadsheet) and different higher-ups. I would have to reverse-engineer the genesis of the “bad mark” across multiple teams and technologies. Only occasionally would this be indicative of an actual issue or problem my team or another internal team could move the needle on. Many dashboards are duplicative and at time contradictory. The company is obsessed with metrics (in fairness, the mission statement begins “Organize Data…”) and “dashboards” which more often than not are really “reports” (i.e. not real-time) but they are often. Unfortunately, this level of scrutiny surveillance does not help build trust. • The “culture of feedback” leads some to ignore the “tell-me-first” rule: If you have a problem, please let me know first, so I can help better meet (or at least properly set) your expectations. There’s a veteran director who sat in the office adjacent to mine, but would regularly send emails to large (e.g. 150 people) distribution lists calling out perceived short-comings of my team, and this would be my (and the team’s) first exposure to the incident in question. My boss kindly forwarded an email from a guy I hadn’t yet met complaining about my lack of ownership over a problem which was completely beyond my control. One of the CIO’s new hires and rising stars sent an email to her boss about what she perceived as my lack of engagement on a project, …. She personally never mentioned this to me before or since, nor frankly, did the CIO except to copy me to an email to my boss (accidentally, I think) describing the dire consequences. • I do not feel “entitled” to free coffee provided by my employer, but will certainly take them up on the offer. The old single-serve machines were nearly all removed and replaced with much larger, fancier machines with touch-screens and cappuccino and multiple choices… I applauded this because I always felt guilty about the environmental cost of k-cups, but … it happened without any announcement or fanfare, and the newer machines were less reliable and would have messages on the touchscreen saying “Swab the foredeck”, or whatever, but the error state had no instructions on how to do that. Again, not complaining about free coffee (we could be discussing release names), but providing a metaphor with how frenetic change was managed (or not) and communicated throughout the company. Despite the accelerated pace of change, there are a few sacred cows: • Goofy team names. (Teams name themselves arbitrary things, so it’s hard to get help on e.g. the fubar component because the responsible team is called El Duderino or somesuch. • The RCA rite of passage. On the footnote of an addendum to your offer letter will be a clause that says something like “As a condition of your employment you will be required to pass the Relativity Certified Administrator exam with a score of 80% or more. You will be given 60 days to do so.” You’ll get three shots at it and they’ll sequester you away from your group so that they’re paying you for theoretically doing nothing but studying for this notoriously difficult exam. If you don’t pass, they let you go. (This is not really highlighted during the interview process, as you might imagine.) When your teams are already very thinly staffed, and you know that best case (i.e. you already know the ideal candidate to replace someone who quit today, and he/she happens to be available immediately) you’re still more than 30 days away from having someone in the seat, you have zero incentive to manage low performers out. Do be careful when you decide to leave: Have your t’s crossed and I’s dotted: Your last day is when health coverage ends, not EOM. They will tell you money in your transit FSA will buy you that least train ticket, but it won’t,etc. At the end of the day, I am glad for the time I spent at this unique firm, and most especially for the great folks and some interesting technology I got to work with there. I always had the feeling that the place “Used to be a great firm”, or “Could one day be a great firm” once they get past these growing pains.

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    16 people found this review helpful

    Relativity Response

    Chief People Officer

    Thanks very much for taking the time to share your thoughts on a range of subjects in such detail. Your input will help us continue creating the future our community of customers and Relativians deserve. - Dorie Blesoff, Chief People Officer

  6. 5.0
    Current Employee, less than 1 year

    Awesome place to work

    Oct 19, 2018 - IT Senior Manager in Chicago, IL
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    People are all great to work with The culture makes you want to come to work everyday Work/Life Balance, Growth Opportunities with in not just your department, but the whole company Location is right in the heart of the loop

    Cons

    I have no cons at the moment

    3 people found this review helpful
  7. 5.0
    Current Employee

    Why work for Relativity?

    Sep 1, 2017 - Senior Software Project Manager in Chicago, IL
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    This is one of the few places that actually lives and breathes their core values. No-one is late for meetings. People treat each other with respect. Feedback is positive. The management lead by example. The work is interesting and challenging and they want to grow your career.

    Cons

    Studying for the RCA as the first thing, while worthwhile, prevents you from interacting with your new team for about a month and can feel overwhelming. Not really a negative and once you're done you get right in with your team.

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  8. 5.0
    Current Employee, more than 1 year

    Awesome

    Mar 17, 2017 - Senior Software Engineering Manager in Chicago, IL
    Recommend
    CEO Approval
    Business Outlook

    Pros

    Fun, fast paced. Business outlook good. Tech challenges abound.

    Cons

    So much going on, can be chaotic.

    2 people found this review helpful
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