Ryan, LLC Reviews | Glassdoor

Ryan, LLC Reviews

Updated June 11, 2017
529 reviews

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529 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Ryan has a flexible work environment that allows it's employees to create a customized approach to work life balance (in 92 reviews)

  • We have excellent compensation & benefits, with a very flexible work environment (in 75 reviews)

Cons
  • Even the team is working towards bringing more policies in terms of Work life balance but there seems to be some thing that need in this front (in 21 reviews)

  • bonus structure not transparent enough, too many small teams compete with each other (in 19 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (14)

    "Pushes fake positive surveys for awards!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Service Delivery in Atlanta, GA
    Current Employee - Service Delivery in Atlanta, GA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Ryan, LLC full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great to be allowed to work at home if you are fortunate enough to have a Manager who actually believes in MyRyan.

    Cons

    Many unhappy employees. Many upper management are clueless on the skill of managing people. They do not appreciate your long hours, nor do they try to help you in any way. They are too focused on themselves. This company will literally suck the life out of you for less than average compensation or appreciation.

    Advice to Management

    Quit placing all your focus on buying every little company for a while and place it on doing what it takes to have happier employees. Happier staff will bring in more money. Quit stressing everyone out over ridiculous benchmarks. Find Managers with true managing skills. Insist that all management actually embrace the MyRyan Work Life Balance. It sounds good, but not much benefit if you cannot utilize it. And quit pushing us to give positive surveys to win best place to work awards. Fake!


  2. Helpful (6)

    "Consultant"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Property Tax Consultant in Long Beach, CA
    Former Employee - Property Tax Consultant in Long Beach, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Ryan, LLC full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Get a nice trip to Dallas to the All company meeting each year.

    Cons

    Had to work over 40 days straight and 70+ hours per week during busy season. It still was not enough to satisfy supervisor. They kept pilling on the work. Insignificant changes were demanded just prior to deadlines.

    Advice to Management

    Become more client centric instead of being concerned with current revenue. It will pay off in the long run.


  3. Helpful (16)

    "Don't do it! Read this review before making your decision!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Consultant in Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Consultant in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Ryan, LLC full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    myRyan, gym reimbursements, community involvement. Also, it is nice to be in the Galleria Mall. Very nice offices!

    Cons

    If you are considering working here, STOP! Do your research. Start by asking your recruiter how much turnover has occurred here. Go even further by asking how many people have been in the role you're applying for in the last year.

    The executive management team are all bullies, and allow Principals to talk down to those that are not - This includes Mr. Brint Ryan himself! On the outside looking in, this looks like a great place to work. Don’t be fooled by all the different awards - Best Places To Work, etc. As an employee, you are expected to complete the survey and only provide positive feedback. You're basically forced to lie and make it appear that this is the most 'awesomeness' place to work. The surveys are supposedly 'confidential' but you must provide your department info and there's also a code on your 'confidential' survey.

    As a part of the hiring process, you have to show copies of your past check stubs and W2’s to prove your past salary. This is absurd, when Ryan doesn’t pay their bills on time. I have friends at Ryan from various departments and I don't know if management knows, but employees are constantly laughing about how the company doesn't pay their bills on time. They are also extremely slow to put my money into my HSA account. It also takes over a week for my 401(k) to show in my account. Is this even legal? How can you hold MY money and wait before depositing it? IT, Human Resources and most of the other support departments have constant turnover and no one ever stays for over a year. Not kidding - ask your Recruiter!

    Unless you need a place to work because you’re unemployed and desperate, keep looking! Don't even waste your time! I would also suggest searching Linked In, finding someone in a similar role as what you're being recruited for, and reach out to that person. Employers check our references and we as employees should do the same!

    Advice to Management

    Stop ignoring the elephant in the room. The problem starts from the top.


  4. Helpful (14)

    "Bad outweighs the good!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager in Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Manager in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Ryan, LLC full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Location and offices are great! Free parking. Easy access to Galleria Mall. Gym membership reimbursement is nice. myRyan is awesome IF you are one of the lucky ones that get to use it.

    Cons

    Upper management and principals are bullies and employees are not treated with respect. MyRyan is great, but it is not available to everyone. Benefits are too expensive. $700 a month for family coverage. HSA and 401k is not deposited on time or consistently. We offer tuition reimbursement and even if you submit everything timely - are in good standings with no disciplinary issues, you're still not reimbursed. They find every possible reason to stall and not pay. They treat you like crap and expect you to be loyal to the company by providing positive information on company surveys. We have many awards, but don't be fooled, the turnover should be a red flag if you're considering a career here. We have won several awards, such as 'Best Places To Work' several times in the last few years, but yet the turnover is ridiculous - doesn't make sense. Ask questions and do your research before accepting. Another Glassdoor comment suggested utilizing your network and Linked In to reach out to current or former employees at Ryan for a company and/or manager reference check. I think that's a great idea!

    Advice to Management

    Pay attention to all the turnover in key departments - HR, Accounting, IT and find the common denominator. Ryan can not and will not be successful if employees in these roles keep resigning.


  5. Helpful (30)

    "Stay Away"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Consultant, International Tax in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Consultant, International Tax in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Ryan, LLC full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Ryan has nice facilities and basic benefits, with the exception of its retirement plan. The firm is also growing, which has created a great number of new opportunities within each practice. The work is substantive and challenging. Individuals with an LL.M. or Masters in Tax are well suited to the work in the international tax practice. There are opportunities in transfer pricing, tax planning/structuring, as well as a host of compliance work. The firm promotes and maintains reasonable work/life balance.

    Cons

    I will start by saying that Ryan is singularly the worst employment experience of my life. I will try to be as gentle as possible, but do know that the following only recounts *some* of my gripes.

    The first frustration that comes to mind is that senior management is stubbornly cheap, and in ways that compromise productivity. I'll list a few examples:

    (1)Ryan will not permit employees to have two computer monitors at their workstations. Given how frequently tax work requires working with two programs simultaneously (e.g. Word and Excel), a single monitor restriction makes a considerable amount of work annoyingly inefficient. Employees have complained vociferously, repeatedly, and with well articulated explanations for why two monitors are necessary, but Ryan senior management has always replied that the benefit is not worth the cost. Decent monitors purchased wholesale can be as cheap as $50 a pop. In a week, an employee could increase productivity sufficiently to cover $50. The benefit is not worth the cost? I strongly disagree.

    (2) Irrespective of one's seniority, employees are not generally provided with subscriptions and login credentials for tax research platforms (BNA, Westlaw, LexisNexis, IBFD, etc.). Subscriptions are only made available after a request and business case have been made, and they are frequently denied. Oftentimes, after unsuccessfully relying on Google for tax research, employees resort to passing around the login credentials of the few individuals who were approved for subscriptions. Not only does this create a queue of individuals waiting for their turn with the login credentials, but it is also a gross violation of the terms and conditions of the underlying contracts with the companies that maintain these platforms. This exposes Ryan to the risk of serious penalties and/or contract termination should the abuse be detected. And to be clear, this is not clandestine behavior confined to underlings; rather, the chicanery is blithely carried on by consultants, managers, and principals alike. I frequently found myself at a total loss when attempting to conduct tax research without the necessary tools. Ryan needs to devote resources to eliminate this problem.

    (3) Before shifting to an entirely virtual annual meeting this year, Ryan scheduled the meeting each year in Dallas during the fourth week of March. Hmmm, 4th week of March? What important date comes 2 weeks later? Yes, Ryan scheduled its annual meeting at the height of tax season, requiring all employees to devote two whole days of crucial time and energy to fly to Dallas and listen to the president, founder and CEO, Brint Ryan, talk about how great his company is. Now, why would he choose the end of March for an annual meeting? Obviously because it's the cheapest time of year for airfare and accommodations. The mantra - save a few bucks, even if it compromises our productivity, reliability, and professionalism.

    Having personally invested a considerable amount of time, money, and energy in my education and career (I'm a lawyer with a tax LL.M.), I found the tight-fisted practices of Ryan wildly insulting. They prevented me from putting my tax acumen to good use, all in the name of saving a few dollars. This alone left me terribly dissatisfied and unfulfilled at work. Adding insult to injury, at the annual meetings in two consecutive years, Brint Ryan openly bragged on stage and in front of all of his employees about his $10 million house. Meanwhile, his employees were struggling to efficiently provide service to their clients because he wouldn't allow them basic industry norms like second monitors and subscriptions to tax research services and because he stole two crucial days of their time in the middle of tax season.

    Another frustrating aspect of Ryan is its compensation structure. Ryan initially established itself in the tax services industry by focusing on transactional tax - primarily property, sales, and use. Not to insult or belittle anyone, but competent professionals in these areas of tax are a dime a dozen. They're not terribly complicated areas of taxation and they typically require little more than an undergraduate degree in accounting ... and oftentimes they don't even require that (I had colleagues with degrees in History and Communications). Although built on transactional tax, Ryan has strategically acquired a number of other businesses over the past 10 years to expand its service offerings. International tax is one of its more recently established practices. Every individual that I know in international tax consulting has, at a minimum, a JD/LLM or is a licensed CPA, most of whom have a Masters in Tax. Everyone I worked with had at least a Masters level graduate degree. International tax is a more complex area of tax (if not the most complex area) that understandably requires additional education and training. In the Big 4, this is reflected in the compensation paid to individuals in this practice area. They command a higher salary. Not so at Ryan. Compensation is determined at flat rates across all practice areas. I arrived at Ryan after it acquired my former company, a small firm with fewer positions in its hierarchy. Because I was an "associate" at the smaller firm, the lowest of 3 positions (I was right out of my LL.M. program), I was made the lowest level at Ryan, which put me on par with recent college graduates, even though I had four more years of education and 6 more years of experience from the years preceding my LL.M. year. Yes, I was paid the same as recent college graduates. To say this was insulting is an understatement. Also, I was promised at the buy-out that my compensation would not be negatively affected by the move. This also turned out not to be the case. Almost the entire year I spent at Ryan, I was staffed on contingency fee projects that had very, very little chance of generating much in the way of bonus. Additionally, the vast majority of employees that came over with the acquisition left within the first year, taking a huge portion of the previous business and projects on which I'd been previously staffed. Consequently, my compensation took a huge, huge hit.

    Speaking of contingency fee projects, Ryan was the plaintiff in the recent DC circuit court decision that invalidated IRS Circular 230's prohibition on contingency fee arrangements (if you're interested the case is G.L. Ridgely, Jr. v. J.J. Lew, Dist. Ct D.C. Civil Action No. 1:12-cv-0565-CRC, 7/16/14). Following this ruling, Ryan began aggressively pitching contingency fee projects to potential clients in an effort to capture market share, even in practice areas where contingency fee arrangements make very little sense. I was staffed on such projects in the international practice for an entire year, and they produced absolutely no recovery for our clients and thus no fees for Ryan and no bonuses for me or others on the projects. In conjunction with the affects of the acquisition, this resulted in an annual gross income over $25,000 less than the income I was assured that I would earn when I took the job with the smaller firm, pre-acquisition. I'd only been with the smaller firm for 4 months at the time of acquisition (a whole other story and gripe I have no time for), but at the time I was well on my way toward reaching the income I'd been assured that I'd make. The acquisition completely upset the apple cart, and I literally struggled to pinch pennies to survive in NYC, even though I have 2 graduates degrees from top tier law schools. The rub - Ryan does not compensate its employees properly.

    Because I'd been at the smaller firm less than a year at the time of acquisition, I decided to stay at Ryan for one full year to avoid leaving a pock mark on my resume. When I reached my 1-year mark, I began aggressively pursuing other jobs. However, my frustrations were so acute that I ultimately resigned before securing another position, and without being asked to resign. I simply could not take it any longer. I had been treated unfairly; I was not properly compensated; the tight-fisted policies of the company made work unnecessarily difficult; and by the end of my tenure, I struggled mightily to muster the requisite enthusiasm and desire necessary to give the work my best effort. Ryan constantly reiterates its enterprise level goal of competing with the Big 4, but before that can ever happen, the company needs to ask itself some tough questions about whether it is willing to take the necessary steps for that to happen. At best, I'm dubious of the proposition; at worst, I find it absurd.

    Advice to Management

    There is so much I could say, but this diatribe is already long enough. I'll summarize in a bulleted list:

    1) Compensate individuals based on the level of expertise and experience required to perform their specific functions. A flat compensation schedule applicable across all practice areas is grossly unfair and deviates significantly from industry norms.

    2) Cost-cutting measures that compromise employees' ability to be efficient and productive are bad for business. Two monitors are an expected and necessary industry norm. There is no legitimate excuse for not providing them. Any employee who routinely conducts tax research should be customarily granted an enterprise-level subscription and login credentials for any necessary tax research platform. You cannot compete with the Big 4 without providing this most basic component of competent tax consulting. Without such necessities being provided, employees frequently resort to violating the terms and conditions of subscription contracts by passing login credentials around, exposing Ryan to penalties and/or contract terminations.

    3) Contingency fee projects might make sense in some areas, but they absolutely do not make sense in others. Staffing employees on contingency fee projects in inappropriate practices spells less compensation for affected employees, lower staff morale, and significant time and resources devoted to pointless and counterproductive work.


  6. Helpful (22)

    "Glad I'm Out"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Former Employee - Consultant
    Former Employee - Consultant
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Ryan, LLC full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    • Most of the people there are friendly.

    • The MyRyan flexible work environment can be a great benefit, provided it’s used properly.

    Cons

    • In pursuit of the “One to One Billion” revenue goal, Ryan feels as if it’s engaged in growth for the sake of growth. Merged/acquired entities aren’t necessarily integrated well into the company, and people who are brought in this way don’t always get job duties with Ryan that make sense with their skills, or that fit them appropriately into existing teams.

    • MyRyan is something of a bait and switch. Only after I was on board was it explained via internal training (and on more than one occasion) that you are expected to put in 55 hours a week – minimum. The workplace flexibility can be used to guilt trip employees into working longer hours, and implementation varies by team.

    • Employee turnover, especially in key functions, like IT, learning, and HR, seems to be high, and quality of service from these areas declined noticeably while I was there. They started off mostly meeting the stated timeframes for response, but I eventually noticed the times getting longer, and on some occasions got no response at all. If you really need help, you may have to make a nuisance of yourself.

    • Ryan makes a big deal out of continuing education, requiring 50 hours annually from most employees. Much of this training is essentially busywork that has little or nothing to do with your job duties, and is accomplished with team building exercises and canned Power Point presentations.

    • Workflow can depend greatly on your area. You can have plenty to do, or far too little. If you’re on the right teams you can get a good balance, but it can be disconcerting if you go for an extended period when billable work is scarce. Outside the core business areas, Ryan’s high fees, inflexible engagement policies, aggressive billing, and litigious nature can be a tough sell. Client retention in my part of the firm was adversely affected by clients questioning fees and the way Ryan’s legal people insisted on structuring the engagements.

    • Advancement opportunities can be very limited.

    • Despite a stated commitment to ethical standards, sometimes it amounts to so much lip service. You may be told certain forms of “creativity” should be considered justifiable somehow (i.e. filing questionable claims because of the potential contingent fees if they slip by). I was told not to worry about it by a management figure in my practice area, who suggested the taxing authorities should be kept on their toes. I can’t say such lapses are widespread, but I know firsthand they do happen, and reporting an issue in such a way as to avoid repercussions may be difficult. Some clients are aware of these practices and balk at engagements accordingly. I placed this item last, but its impact on my conscience was a major reason I chose to leave.

    Advice to Management

    • Concentrate on core competencies instead of growing for the sake of it.

    • Work on employee retention and service delivery to ensure internal “customers” get quality service on a timely basis.

    • Make sure the commitment to ethics is consistent everywhere.

    • Eliminate the fluff so learning hours are productive.

    • At last year’s annual firm meeting, Brint Ryan himself encouraged employees to read and post reviews on Glassdoor. Take a look at the rating trends since then and figure out if you’re really getting the feedback you wanted. You know which of these reviews are real and which aren't.

    Ryan, LLC Response

    May 2, 2016 – Ryan, LLC

    Thank you for taking the time to review Ryan. Both current and former employee feedback are very important to us. That is one reason why we often ask for “pulse checks” from employees—to gauge how ... More


  7. Helpful (20)

    "Steer Clear!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Dallas, TX
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Offers flex-time and all the other great things required to make it onto the Best Places to Work list.

    Cons

    They obviously "bought" their way onto the Best Places to Work list. Everyone hates working there. Senior leadership is out of touch with reality and with the workforce. Corporate office turnover is insanely high.

    Advice to Management

    Fix your company culture. Allow your employees to have some work/life balance. At least pretend to appreciate all your employees do for you.


  8. Helpful (7)

    "property tax"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Former Employee - Property Tax
    Former Employee - Property Tax
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Ryan, LLC full-time

    Pros

    It was a job...that's all I can say

    Cons

    Too Many to list. Cheap company where the CEO offers a prize every year of driving his Lamborghini for a weekend....Seriously?...What a narcissist.


  9. Helpful (17)

    "The Truth About Ryan"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Ryan, LLC full-time

    Pros

    Ryan does a poor job recruiting outside of Dallas so for the most part if you have a pulse and a degree in anything you can get a job in one of the satellite offices doing tax work.

    Cons

    Apparently upper management has sent emails to employees to try to get them to post positive reviews and hide the negative reviews so of course the upper management in some of the offices with something to gain by trying to make it seem like this is a good place to work will post positive reviews.

    - Ryan will have problems getting new clients with the widespread knowledge of the fraud that took place involving even a former Principal going to prison.

    - The bonus system is a joke. Just because a small amount of the people here have lucked out and been on some big projects that were handed to them and have earned large bonuses the majority of people here aren't making any significant bonuses.

    - Describing the company as "Entrepreneurial" is an excuse for paying their employees low base salary's. As a staff member you are at the mercy of whatever projects get handed to your team. Garbage projects will equal garbage bonuses. Most of the good projects will stay in Dallas.

    -This bonus system has promoted a culture of greed and disgruntled employees who aren't being given the larger revenue projects.

    - HIGH turnover. I have never seen so many people leave a company. It is particularly bad in IT and HR. People are constantly leaving from the various practices also and then there work gets passed on and people have no idea what happened with the project.

    Advice to Management

    The system you have created as created greed and in my opinion is the reason why you have had some of these "client service failures". There is a reason why no one else in the industry operates with this structure. A system highly based on bonus does not work in the tax industry. This isn't a sales job or a boiler room.


  10. Helpful (15)

    "Started out good but went downhill"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Consultant
    Former Employee - Consultant
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Ability to work on interesting projects/cient, flexibility, nice offices

    Cons

    1) The culture is absolutely toxic.
    2) Incompetent people get hired and/or promoted. The company refuses to promote you for qualifications (i.e. advances degrees, certifications, etc.) but will promote someone who barely has a high school diploma (if they're buddy buddy with someone at the top).
    3) Many people act in a childish and unprofessional manner.
    4) The pay is way too low for the amount of work you have to do.
    5) Greedy managers and partners sit on accounts and collect the majority of bonuses without doing any work.
    6) Often times you are forced to do projects that have no potential to make profit or bonuses.
    7) Fixation on winning useless and meaningless awards and not on fixing internal problems.

    Advice to Management

    I don't think this place is fixable...


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