Sally Beauty Reviews | Glassdoor

Sally Beauty Reviews

Updated September 25, 2017
841 reviews

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2.8
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Sally Beauty CEO Chris Brickman
Chris Brickman
177 Ratings

841 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Low pay was the biggest problem I had (in 72 reviews)

  • I decided to leave because of the expectations of this company and some of the upper management were greater than it was worth (in 65 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Featured Review

    "Sales associate"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Easy friendly ppl and discount

    Cons

    Some customers are really rude


  2. "Sale Executive"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales Executive in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Sales Executive in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Sally Beauty (More than a year)

    Pros

    really nice people and atmosphere

    Cons

    the commute was very very long

  3. "Love my company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - District Manager in San Antonio, TX
    Current Employee - District Manager in San Antonio, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Sally Beauty full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Great Benefits, fast pace, great people

    Cons

    a lot of travel time

    Advice to Management

    keep asking for input from employees


  4. "Assistant manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Sally Beauty full-time

    Pros

    Lots of product knowledge and training

    Cons

    Customers can be rude but few and far

    Advice to Management

    Remember you were a sales associate once


  5. "The customers are nice, the job is fine. Managers get under 32,000/yr"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Store Manager in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Store Manager in Boston, MA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Sally Beauty full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Free products monthly and great discount.

    Cons

    Too many resets of the layout of the store and the pay is really low.

    Advice to Management

    I am a manager.


  6. Helpful (4)

    "A River Runs Through It"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - BI Developer in Denton, TX
    Former Employee - BI Developer in Denton, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Some great work with some of the finest people I've ever worked with -- talented and fun to boot. The reason I gave them 3 stars is because their problems are pretty much the same as every company I've been in. If you're fine with that -- then it's a great place. For what happened to me -- they don't deserve 3 stars, but I'm trying be fair by considering the overall and that their problems are all-too typical.

    In some ways I could even get them 4 stars, so I think the rating system on Glassdoor needs to be more specific.

    Cons

    If you're gonna decorate your walls with your "Culture of Can Do" credos—don't cry foul when someone holds you accountable to your claims:

    *************************************

    We manage with integrity / We listen to each other / We build trust / We act as one / We take ownership / We are talent builders / We encourage continuous improvement / We stay cool during times of change / We welcome new ideas / We help people succeed and grow / We have a bias for action / We deliver results / We are accountable / We focus on our customers’ needs /
    We are a culture of can do . . .

    *************************************

    For the first few weeks at Sally, I worked day and night and loved every minute of it. I was exhausted day after day—and yet I would wake up raring to go. One morning I said to myself, “Dead and Alive”—in that I was energized in my exhaustion. I loved walking into Sally every day (the building on Morse Rd). I remember being so excited about working in their beautiful corporate office—only to find that I’d be working in this other location. From the outside, it’s nothing special—but from the moment I walked in the door, I found it refreshing in a way I had never felt before. It’s so bright and uplifting (the lighting, the temperature, the walls, the ceiling, the carpet, the unique coffee machine, the cubes (though lacking on some ways—overall, they were fantastic with their frosted glass and all).

    There are just so many positive things I could say about that place—and “almost” all the people I worked with.

    I would add that the extra hours were ramp-up time for me on MDX, so that extra time was not for billable hours (and rightly so). It was a wonderful opportunity for me to do some work I’ve been dying to get into for years, and I was willing to do whatever it took to deliver.

    Once I got into a rhythm, I had the process down pretty well—so I had found my groove. I love those times when you’re under the gun and there’s so much to overcome in order to fulfill your responsibilities. It had been a long time since I felt like that, and it should have been smooth sailing from that point on.

    But bad apples and inept managers have a knack for ruining a good thing.

    It never ceases to amaze me that companies will fret over money while flagrantly wasting it.

    We’ve created a song-and-dance culture where “presentation” is paramount—where company handbooks espouse what is glaringly absent in practice. Where you can put up a “wall of words” for company credos—while an undercurrent of systemic nonsense flows along with ease.

    It takes a special kind of stupidity to put up with people who poison possibility—and then condemn the dedicated who actually live up to every word on that wall, but have the nerve to call it like it is.

    I did everything I could to keep my mouth shut—letting my manager persist in his folly, because I just came here to keep my head down and diligently do my job. That someone was brazenly impeding progress on one report—in the past I never would have let that go. But if they wanna be idiotic about how they run their business—and pay somebody with bad attitude (the running joke, the resident clown, the company mascot—every company inexplicably employs these people), then have at it.

    This time, I was done trying to explain the fundamentals of leadership to people who are seemingly oblivious to their bedrock responsibilities. That a manager would openly gripe about the person in question—fumbling around while trying to solve the symptoms of a problem (instead of picking up the phone for 5 minutes with the other person’s manager—to deal with the source)—is preposterous.

    How could the most obvious possible solution utterly escape someone in charge?

    At the heart of the problem is that most managers in IT are not real leaders—they’re typically technical people who want to move up and need to get promoted somehow. They want the money, the power, and the prestige, but they don’t really want the responsibility that comes with the job. They are usually fixated on a getting another feather in their cap, and anything that interferes with them keeping up appearances must be eliminated.

    There’s a reason why I find out so much information so early on in my contracts—because I’m paying attention and listening to those who have something to say. And why do you think those colleagues confide in me? It’s because the manager is flagrantly failing them. These so-called leaders talk out of both sides of their mouth—putting on a show about how their “door is always open”—never mind how wildly out of whack they are from reality.

    They’re not real managers—they’re glorified administrators who play a part. Time after time it all comes back to the “presentation”—while simultaneously shirking their inherent responsibilities.

    As I put in a letter to the CEO:

    *************************************

    It’s a given that there’s a degree of finesse that’s required when dealing with personalities and resistance, but when that effort becomes excessive—at some point it’s an HR/managerial matter. I wrote the following many years ago: “What confounds me is why companies coddle people who epitomize the lowest common denominator. Rather than inspire them to rise to standards set by others, the meticulous are asked to accommodate the careless. Moreover, there seems to be a universal rolodex of excuses that gets spun to absolve those in question.”

    *************************************

    And what you think this CEO was concerned about in response to my letter?

    That a contractor didn’t go through the “proper” channels to communicate his concerns.

    And THAT is the BS of “The American Way—to deflect, evade, blame—whatever it takes so long as you don’t have to accept responsibility for anything. Anything goes in a culture of “I claim, therefore I am.”

    And what of that “Culture of Can Do”—all that stuff about accountability, ownership, integrity, results, trust, acting as one, growth, listening, and bias for action.

    Sure looks good on a wall, doesn’t it!

    And last but not least—I love how all these stand-ups act as a way to disguise the obvious. There’s nothing wrong with stand-ups—I just take issue with putting up stickies while the glaringly obvious goes unaddressed.

    “You’re not doing your job!”—how’s that for a sticky?

    I love Bill Belichick’s outlook on teamwork: “The main point to me is that [the players] have to be coordinated, and the 10 people have to support what that 11th guy is doing, and vice versa. . . . The only way that can happen is for there to be discipline, for everyone to be disciplined enough to do their job, knowing the guy beside him is doing his, too, so that you can count on him and he can count on you, and go right down the line.”

    It all goes back to fundamentals and it always will. I don’t care if you make billions for a company—if you don’t deliver on your inherent responsibilities, you’re still a failure in my eyes.

    Richard W. Memmer

    Advice to Management

    “The shortest and surest way to live with honor in the world, is to be in reality what we would appear to be. All human virtues increase and strengthen themselves by the practice and experience of them.” — Socrates


  7. Helpful (1)

    "Need management revamp"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Sally Beauty full-time

    Pros

    Fun industry to work in

    Cons

    Poor upper management. Trying too many different engagement programs without follow through.

    Advice to Management

    Need to really hear what employees are saying about their managers.

  8. "Sale"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales Associate in Waltham, MA
    Former Employee - Sales Associate in Waltham, MA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Sally Beauty part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Loved working with people

    Cons

    Sometimes the young girls would talk on the phone and not work

    Advice to Management

    Give everything one jobs to do


  9. "Store Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Store Manager in Charlotte, NC
    Former Employee - Store Manager in Charlotte, NC
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Sally Beauty full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Meeting new people, working withyour team daily and generating new sales techniques.

    Cons

    Not enough advancement or support

    Advice to Management

    More internal advancement


  10. "Good for a first job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Sales Associate
    Current Employee - Sales Associate
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Sally Beauty (More than a year)

    Pros

    Many things to do. Not much sitting around doing nothing

    Cons

    No moving up unless a manager leaves the store


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