Squarespace Reviews | Glassdoor

Squarespace Reviews

Updated March 29, 2017
105 reviews

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3.7
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Anthony Casalena
77 Ratings

105 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • There is a great work/life balance here (in 8 reviews)

  • Love the goodies and catered lunch (in 13 reviews)

Cons
  • Other negative reviews here accurately reflect life in Customer Care in great depth, so just to echo similar points: (in 9 reviews)

  • There is a divide where people that have been there for longer than 2 years are not feeling valued and do not feel that there is room for growth (in 5 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Featured Review

    "Great place to work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Squarespace full-time

    Pros

    Talented team, awesome product, competitive compensation, cool office, tons of flexibility, and great benefits. The company is growing and growing with the right people.

    Cons

    Nothing to add here. Will edit in the future if this changes.

    Advice to Management

    Continue to focus on growing your people and building out a great product.


  2. "Great!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Customer Care Representative in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Customer Care Representative in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Squarespace full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Great atmosphere, very nice ppl.

    Cons

    Hard to climb up the ladder.


  3. Helpful (12)

    "Past the tipping point"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Squarespace full-time

    Pros

    Luxurious office space, fantastic benefits, free food, lots of wonderful and smart people.

    Cons

    Squarespace likes to push the notion that they care. Do not be fooled by the fancy benefits, fancy office spaces, and HR presentations. While these perks are quite nice and worth a good amount of money, they are in place to attract talent and because its where the industry bar has been set.

    Some of what I'm about to say is relevant only to the department in which I worked and does not necessarily apply to the company as a whole. However, some of it does.

    The spirit of collaboration is dead here. While autonomy can be nice in that there is no micromanaging - you are simply trusted to just do a good job - the reality is that Its largely every person for themselves. If you want to learn anything and grow "you gotta steal it." (as stated repeatedly by upper management.)

    Opportunity and advancement seems somewhat arbitrary – with some people working for over a year at levels well above their title or what they were being paid for and others being hired or promoted for positions in which they had close to zero experience (including positions in management.) Obviously this is not across the board, but when it comes to hiring management, one bad decision can (and did) cause significant inertia in critical areas where the company shouldn't have been falling behind.

    Equally as arbitrary is how they choose to deal with sexual harassment. (Not implied, subtle undermining, mind you, but blatant, public, verifiable acts.) Over the course of a few years there were a handful of firings for this kind of misconduct, but there were also exceptions that involved a mere slap on the wrist. The distinction was seemingly based on whether the employe had established their value to the company as a worker.

    That is - if you're talented, hard working and generally good at your job, you're more likely to get away with it. And some have.

    Like other prominent tech companies, there seems to be a bit of wiggle room in the so called Zero Tolerance Harassment Policy. If the recent TechCrunch article is any indication, ("Uber is Not the Only Company That Mishandles Sexual Harassment Claims") Squarespace has proven that it is sadly on par with the tech industry in this respect.

    After one such public allegation, HR did a lengthy presentation addressing issues of diversity and harassment in which it reiterated its policies and stated that they are a "safe place" for any employee to come and speak honestly.

    However, the truth is that they are there to protect the interests of the company first and foremost. This became clear when on each of the two times I brought up my discomfort about an employee who had not been dismissed after publicly harassing a colleague, my concerns were received with something between well maneuvered neutrality and politically necessary indifference.

    That said, Squarespace is not altogether a bad place. When I started, the true spirit of a start up was still intact; It was clear that the people there were driven by the desire to innovate and do their best work – a genuinely exciting and fulfilling environment to be in. It could be said that it has merely encountered the common tipping point in the growth curve where principles take a back seat to politics and integrity rapidly degrades. If you go into it with this in mind, you'll be fine. However, this was not a transition I could abide.

    Advice to Management

    Get back to the principles that made you a success.


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  5. Helpful (3)

    "Came for the free lunch, left with a career"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Training & Development Lead in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Training & Development Lead in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Squarespace full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    I can't say enough good things about my time at Squarespace.

    Typical tech perks aside, it is an absolutely fantastic place to work, where hard work and dedication is rewarded with opportunities to pursue what you're passionate about. I gave the company 110% and in turn was always well taken care of, especially in times of need. I came to Squarespace with no career prospects, and I'm leaving with skills and knowledge that will sustain me for the rest of my working life.

    The Recruiting Team does a phenomenal job hiring not only top talent, but truly the best *people* - there is not a single person in the company that I wouldn't go have a beer with after work. I've made friendships that have endured and will continue to long after I'm gone.

    Cons

    I honestly don't have any.


  6. Helpful (7)

    "I thought I was joining an innovator in the tech industry but I ended up in a call center."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Customer Care Representative in Portland, OR
    Former Employee - Customer Care Representative in Portland, OR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Squarespace full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Above-average pay for customer service/call center work. This would be a good job right out of college, or possibly as a transition between nametag-customer-service and working in an office environment. The pros are definitely in place to dull the drudgery of menial customer service work. You could do a lot worse.

    If you're any further in your career and think working for a tech company may be beneficial to your development, please see below.

    Cons

    I applied for work here when the Portland office was opening, lured by the promise of getting in on the ground floor of a new office for a growing company. However, this office is a complete dead end, as Squarespace's customer care is run like another, separate company within the company. There's no room to move up. New positions within customer care are few and far between, and most management positions are given to outside hires. A title and role change doesn't mean a pay raise, and since customer care is constantly reshuffling and restructuring, what used to be your own separate role will suddenly become something baked into everyone else's job. When I began, for example, the transition from email to live chat came with a pay raise, and only if you elected to pursue it. Now it's been shuffled in as a standard responsibility for everyone in customer care. Sadly, I was moved to live chat during that shuffling, so my job completely changed under me and I saw no compensation. I would not have elected to do live chat if given the choice, but unfortunately I was the last person with any opinion on my career at Squarespace.

    Pay raises are nominal, infrequent, and matched by incoming employees' base salaries, leaving tenured, hardworking employees with nothing to show for their efforts and time. It's clear management is ill-equipped to support the needs of their employees; they don't share the workload and are mainly there to babysit you and feed you the company line. When you've spent an hour taking abuse from an irate winery owner who's unable to log into their account because they've had their caps lock on the whole time, it can be quite lousy to have to sit down with your supervisor and be told how you could've possibly ended the interaction sooner, or how you could've been more cheerful in your responses.

    The moment you stop drinking the Kool-Aid, things go downhill fast. Advocate for yourself and you'll just put a target on your back. Often the benefits are thrown back in your face; on multiple occasions, mentions of unfair treatment or untenable changes were met with a reminder that we get free lunch or "unlimited" PTO. I've heard stories as well as seen firsthand people have their place in the company threatened for asking inconvenient (but valid) questions in "ask me anything"-style meetings. Many would call this retaliation.

    Customer Care is the first point of contact for customers, and the furthest away from any actionable change. You'll tire of hearing the same basic shortcomings of the platform and fielding suggestions that cannot possibly be implemented. You'll soon tire of submitting feature requests or bug fixes, as you know most of them fall on deaf ears.

    There's an utter lack of ongoing product training after onboarding, and as the platform and internal policies are eternally shifting, you can ask three people the same question and get three answers that were right at one point or another. Features and integrations are constantly implemented and live tested without warning. Sometimes you'll be informed of a change through a backdated email, or when a customer reaches out with an issue about said change, leaving you scrambling for an answer on the fly. This leads to an aggressive in-house apathy where advisors just try to push emails and chats through as fast as possible without actually *solving* the problems customers present.

    Management doesn't keep promises and benefits are slowly being scaled back. Open communication is mainly lip service; management will say "we're looking into it" when a valid issue is brought up and then never readdresses the issue. Often you're told to come up with a project to solve an issue that's beyond your authority to address. Other times, you'll be asked for "actionable feedback," which is another way of shrugging off staff concerns and gaslighting you into thinking nothing's going to change, and that it's your own fault things haven't.

    Most of the perks are in place a) because that's where the tech-world bar's been set and b) to maintain the company's image. There's a reason the office is smack-dab in the middle of downtown Portland; Squarespace wants to be seen as cool and vital, even though they're just running a call center. The hip, sleek office is actually quite sterile and unfriendly, especially as we were discouraged from hanging anything on walls. There's an eerie paranoia surrounding allowing visitors or the general public to see what it looks like inside. The "open" office environment means no privacy or personal space. Team Leads and advisors who aren't yet in chat make distracting levels of noise, leaving you feeling like a curmudgeon for having to focus on your concurrent chats. Personal space isn't respected, and often you'll come in to find your chair readjusted or straight-up missing, and personal items on your desk broken or missing.

    Some of this you can turn a blind eye to and possibly abide a lot earlier in your career. However, it'll wear you down sooner rather than later, especially chat, where KPIs are unrealistic, as has been admitted by management (but of course, nothing's been done about it). Based on the direction things had been taking in the two years I'd worked there, it's only bound to get worse.

    Advice to Management

    I'm not sure there's much I can say that won't go unheard. I've spoken up about these concerns as your employee and your actions have spoken volumes about your lack of interest in anything other than the Bottom Line. Talented, innovative people are jumping ship for really anything else they can get their hands on. Maybe the next batch of hires won't notice the problems as you stabilize, but I doubt it, as I still hear stories about constant shuffles and restructuring.

    To the CEO: I know everyone's telling you everything's going So Great over in PDX, and maybe you got that impression from the hour of photo op time you spent here on your last visit, but the pivot in focus from quality to quantity will only hurt your company's customer service.


  7. Helpful (3)

    "Customer Care is an ill-managed call center with little to no growth."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Customer Care Advisor in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Customer Care Advisor in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Squarespace full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The biggest 'pro' is the name recognition, and it absolutely carries weight when applying for similar gigs in tech.

    Good step for those transitioning out of retail into office culture.

    Typical tech/startup company window dressing (free meals, snacks, etc.), but this is already the standard at most tech companies.

    I'm genuinely a fan of the product.

    Cons

    Other negative reviews here accurately reflect life in Customer Care in great depth, so just to echo similar points:

    - Management is self-serving and ill-equipped to do their jobs. Upwards feedback is deflected. Managers goof around with nerf fights and other distractions while agents are too busy. If you do provide valid and constructive feedback, be ready to be lectured on how grateful you should be that they provide free lunch and snacks.

    - Drink the office Kool-Aid if you want to get anywhere. I get it, every office has its politics, but Squarespace has it dialed up to 11. I've seen quality employees get overlooked in favor of company cheerleaders who spend more time playing ping-pong than working.

    - Little to no growth opportunities from entry-level CC positions.

    - No innovation in CC. Management doesn't care to hear it from agents.

    - For all intents and purposes, CC is separate from the rest of the company. Don't bother hoping to move elsewhere, or at the very least get an opportunity to learn from and to collaborate with members in other departments. Yes, some CC agents have been promoted to the mothership, but that was a long time ago and the org is just too big now.

    - Inadequate training, and when you are struggling, leadership throws you shade and makes you feel incompetent. It's a lot of the old guard spouting lines like "well I didn't have this training when I started and I could do it so why can't you?"

    - My role changed to one with added responsibility but without a pay raise.

    The thing is, I've had jobs I've liked way less. It's a better than retail as far as the day-to-day is concerned, but the Squarespace culture is just so toxic.

    Their presence on Crain's Best Places to Work is compelling, but keep in mind companies have to submit themselves to be eligible and acceptance is based on evaluations submitted by employees. A good chunk of Squarespace doesn't work in CC, so bear that in mind when factoring that into your decision to apply.

    Advice to Management

    I said my piece to management on multiple occasions and just get stonewalled.

    CEO needs to take more interest in the largest department in the org.


  8. "Amazingly creative people"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Product Engineer in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Product Engineer in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Squarespace full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Company prides itself on excellency, regardless of the time it takes

    Cons

    Some decisions take too long

    Advice to Management

    Keep up leading by example!


  9. "Lucky to work here"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Squarespace full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I can't say enough positive things about working at Squarespace. Passionate and talented people, incredible work life balance, impactful product, meaningful mission and an emphasis on employees' well being. The beautiful office, free lunch, roof deck and dog policy don't hurt either!

    Cons

    Can't think of one con.

    Advice to Management

    Keep putting employees first and try to maintain our unique culture as we scale.


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Amazing Company!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - E-Commerce Specialist
    Former Employee - E-Commerce Specialist
    Recommends

    Pros

    Great food and perks! Enjoyed the office culture.

    Cons

    regular startup issues. Sometimes quick unexpected changes.


  11. Helpful (18)

    "Meh."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Amazing benefits (100% coverage)
    Beautiful offices
    Catered lunch / snacks
    Company outings

    Cons

    Upper management sees you as a number. Metrics are almost impossible to meet. A lot of the emphasis is on Live Chat, and if you're not hitting five an hour, then you just put a target on your back. Most of the times this is out of your control as the volume isn't there. In addition to this, there are a lot of customers that require more in depth assistance, yet management doesn't care. They want quantity over quality, in order to meet the needs of the business. We get countless compliments from customers regarding our service, which is true. The customer care department is one of the most dedicated teams I've worked with, but the sheer expectations of management will lead you to be overworked and burnt out very quickly.

    You're put into teams and assigned to a team lead, who just consistently micro manage you. You can't really blame them as this is all in the hands of upper management. If you're more of an independent worker, then this place isn't for you. Be prepared to get reprimanded if you're not meeting or exceeding your metrics.

    Everything is a competition. Recognition is great, but to boast about certain people exceeding expectations isn't encouraging at all, and it tends to make people feel worthless, and things like this often leads to favoritism.

    Also note that you will apologize to customers a countless number of times for features that the platform doesn't have because the product is severely lacking. I've learned of so many creative ways to say sorry to customers.

    The customer care team is incredibly huge, over 200 employees, which makes up the majority of the company. With that being said, there is zero room for growth. I've been with the company for three years, and never had the opportunity to show my true talents, even though you have the chance to contribute to other speciality teams, you're left to do the grunt work. I've literally been told that Squarespace may not be the place for me by one of my supervisors, and that I should consider another job because of this. Seriously.

    When I first started, this was a true start up and a very close, tight knit community. Forget about that now. No one speaks to each other, and overall the team is very "clique-ey" Products and changes will be released with little notice. On top of this, you don't really get to learn the product because you're answering chats and tickets all day. How are you expected to be productive and have a steady workflow when you know nothing about the product, or things are sprung on you last minute.

    Management has a BS open door policy. They urge you to bring up concerns and ideas. However, if those don't match to the opinions of management, then again, you just made yourself a target. I've learned that some of my colleagues have been terminated for speaking up about the rampant favoritism that goes on here.

    While the benefits are amazing, you're left to feel extremely over worked and under paid.

    All in all, if you're a compassionate, empathetic person, who truly wants to help people, and are seeking out growth then this isn't the place for you.

    Advice to Management

    Customer care makes up the majority of the company. While all departments are equally important, emphasis should be put on this team as it is the largest and the face of the company. Customers speak to advisors, not to engineers, marketing, or HR. Be realistic with your expectations, and get more involved. True leaders lead by example.



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