Stitch Fix Reviews | Glassdoor

Stitch Fix Reviews

Updated May 16, 2018
478 reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Limited room for growth from home (in 20 reviews)

  • It's not hard to shine at Stitch Fix (in 26 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Stylist Role"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Stitch Fix part-time

    Pros

    flexible scheduling
    great coworkers
    decent pay
    great communication with leaders

    Cons

    med-high expectations but obviously if the company wants to succeed
    not a lot of opportunity for growth


  2. Helpful (10)

    "Had its moments..."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Stylist in Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Stylist in Austin, TX

    I worked at Stitch Fix part-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    - A great creative outlet. I genuinely enjoyed getting to interpret people's requests to try and make them happy and feel good about themselves
    - A new appreciation of the female form. I learned about a ton of different body types and the challenges each faces from very petite to plus sized.
    - Flexible schedule. Getting to work remotely was a positive for me and I was able to work during the day so probably helped that feeling of satisfaction
    - Getting to work behind the tech of a cutting edge company, very cool to see how the sausage is made
    - Developing relationships with clients. I loved being a reliable source for people to update their wardrobes seasonally, new periods of life (jobs, kids etc) or for events

    Cons

    - Clearly the inventory issue needs to be addressed in a larger context but it often seemed to me that buyers were probably regarded with the same sense of disposability as stylists. The openings on Glassdoor always seem to be very junior in nature when it's clear that the scope of the role has expanded and probably needs quite a few more senior hires
    - Felt very disposable. With lacking inventory, and no incentives financially for successful Fixes, it's easy to lose steam
    - The metrics for the stylist role are not in line with the pay scale. Very intensive reporting that surely can be used on the back end but doesn't align with the effort that a $14/hr role suggests
    - Out of touch pay scale. Stylists are sales people. I did some rough calculations before I left about how much inventory I personally had sold and the numbers are staggering. I'm sure the engineers need to be paid a premium to continually update the back end at a high level, but that shouldn't exclude appropriate compensation for other positions in the company. Sales people typically reap the rewards of what they sell in a more concrete way either via bonuses or commissions.
    - Upward mobility very lacking. I personally was not interested in moving to a Lead position- but largely that's because I like styling and the Lead position is managing 30+ stylists and their metrics at any given time.
    - I grew tired of the robotic responses and lack of personalization from Leads when giving feedback or asking questions. You can stick to company policy while still treating your employees like real people
    - The 15 hours a week is easily completed some weeks, some weeks you have to log in and out so many times that your scheduled 15 hours easily stretches from 15 to 20+ without the appropriate compensation.

    Advice to Management

    I've thought about this review a lot in my head and want to be clear that I enjoyed working at the company but think it has some thinking to do about how they want to expand as they continue to grow. Overall the stylist role seems targeted to independently wealthy people who enjoy styling but don't rely on it for income. I, interestingly, fit into this demographic which is why I was able to leave when the inventory and time/FPH issues became too much for me to deal with. I did enjoy the role and would have stayed if there were more options to permanently or seasonally scale back my hours OR if I felt I was being appropriately compensated. This, to me, seems obvious. Commission/bonus out your sales people! This helps eliminate inventory, too; if people are being pushed to sell all the sweatshirts left in inventory by April 1st and are seeing financial benefits to doing so, it's going to be much easier to clear inventory and bring in more seasonally appropriate items. I think instead of continually sharing information that you're hiring new stylists regionally, take a long hard look at retention and how you can support those already in place and what the true metrics of a tenured stylist with 60 repeat clients a week would/should look like vs a brand new stylist pumping out a bunch of brand new clients. I think there's a ton of potential for this role to really be a long term option for stylists whether they're looking for full time or supplemental income, but there needs to be some acknowledgment of the challenges they face and how changes are going to be made in the future to retain loyal stylists. Finally- run a small marketing campaign teaching clients how to interact with their stylists!! It doesn’t have to be anything crazy but I think that many clients could benefit from seeing what an effective note looks like vs an ineffective (or incredibly rude) request/feedback.

  3. Helpful (11)

    "Great company model but seriously lacking diversity!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    The concept behind Stitch Fix is great and it is inspiring to work at a company where creative women are the majority. Stitch Fix is providing a service to busy and wardrobe challenged women nationwide.

    Cons

    Stitch Fix lacks diversity in the SF headquarters. It's astounding to see such little representation of women of color- especially in a location as diverse as the San Francisco Bay area. It makes their hiring practices seem questionable.

    Advice to Management

    Honor all women by hire more women of color to provide a more diverse perspective!!!


  4. Helpful (20)

    "Remote Stylist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Remote Stylist
    Current Employee - Remote Stylist

    I have been working at Stitch Fix part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    1. Flexibility. You commit to 15 hours per week, and can go down to less hours in seasons that are not as busy. You can choose your number of hours per day, and are expected to stick to that within reason. It's a good addition to a full-time job that I am using for extra income for savings for my future while I don't have extra responsibilities like children. The pay is pretty decent for what it is, picking clothes on your computer in your free time.

    2. Discount. I enjoy getting my own Fixes and getting higher end pieces at a nice discount. It's especially worth it for shoes, bags, and Luxe items - assuming you can find the pieces you want in your own size.

    3. They have made significant improvements over time with the ability to filter by size, colors, sleeve lengths, silhouettes and to search by key phrases. But these only help when there is inventory available to grab

    Despite the cons below, I'm still staying with it because it's the easiest way to supplement my income. If things don't improve in the next 6 months, I will have to reconsider. This job is becoming increasingly more stressful and I am feeling less heard each day.

    Cons

    1. Inventory. It's been bad for about 6 months now, but if we're being honest, it's always been bad for people who style nights and weekends to accommodate another full time job. It's picked over and you can't even accommodate basic requests, like blouses for work.

    2. Metrics. You are given metrics to uphold and scored on them, but it's unclear exactly how they are scored. They say they adjust for the company average, inventory situations, how many items are rated as "love it", but we have no insight into that. For the two most important metrics, there is literally no number assigned to them. You are given one of three colors - red, green, or mint. Red is bad, and if you are there long enough, you are put on a coaching plan. There's no clear number of what our performance should be in order to keep our job, just that it has to be "in the green."

    3. Styling management. They are not in tune to what goes on for the stylists. The official response to any rough situation is "get creative." If you mention inventory, they find ways to say you just aren't trying hard enough, or suggest getting up at 5 am to style every day. Or taking time away from your full-time job to style during the day. The worse things get, the more pointless meetings are scheduled and suddenly your 15 hour time commitment per week is pushing 17 hours. They'll also periodically review your Fixes and send you notes about what you should have sent instead of what you did, and you have to defend yourself. They also do not ever make evening options available for monthly check-ins, meaning people have to step away from their jobs to deal with another job.

    4. Technology. The system has issues AT LEAST once per week, meaning people have to hold off on styling and rearrange their schedules and styling time on the fly.

    5. Unrealistic client expectations. Clients can be horrible. They'll provide a list of exactly what they want, and when you can't meet it, they berate you and call you stupid, say you should lose your job, ask if you can read. Or you'll send exactly what they want, only for them to say that's not what they wanted. If you escalate for it it to be reached out, you get thrown under the bus to save face with the client. There's also clients who give vague phrases like "I dress like I'm thirty" or "I like to dress age-appropriately" and then hate your interpretation of what is appropriate for a 40 year old mom to wear.

    6. You do get paid sick time, but it is only for when you are sick. And they will push back if you request multiple days in a row. When I had the flu and took two days off, they suggested I move my hours to later in the week rather than using my sick time, even though I had plenty. There's also no communication on if that can be cashed out when you leave like other accumulated paid time.

    7. Seasonal training sessions. In theory, these are a great way to see inventory, get advice, and learn better techniques. But they are always held during the day! For anyone with another job (a lot of stylists), it requires taking time off to attend, which really is not feasible. For moms, it requires finding a babysitter in the middle of the day. And you have to pay for parking at these events that are not mandatory, just "highly encouraged."

    Advice to Management

    1. Hire better buyers. It is insane that this even has to be said to a retail company. How you can only have skinny jeans available? Or even worse, days when no jeans are available for specific sizes? How can you not anticipate bright colors and florals for spring? When will fitted clothes be bought? We fill out inventory forms weekly stating our requests based on what we see from the client, and nothing ever happens. Which leads me to...

    2. Listen to the stylists and make actionable change. We are on the front-line, we see what clients are requesting, and we consistently pass that along and it never changes. Clients ask for more workwear basics and yet we have the same styles in the same colors, but no worries, we got crop tops this season! Clients ask for fitted pieces and we continue to receive only loose fitting styles. You rate the stylists on on whether or not clients feel heard by them - have you considered what your rating would be if stylists rated on you on that same metric? We hear the same things week after week and it NEVER gets better.


  5. "senior stylist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Stylist in Remote, OR
    Current Employee - Stylist in Remote, OR
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I have been working at Stitch Fix part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    flexible, creative, great company

    Cons

    poor inventory, repetitive job


  6. "Working at stitch fix"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Stitch Fix part-time

    Pros

    Fair and good pay for employees

    Cons

    can get boring but still great


  7. Helpful (7)

    "Senior Part Time Stylist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Stitch Fix part-time

    Pros

    It is flexible and fun to pick out special things for our clients.

    Cons

    I have been a stylist for 3.5 years. When I started, things were very flexible and mgmt was very laid back. As long as you got your hours done for the week and were getting good feedback from clients, nothing more was asked of you. In recent years, they expect us to keep a schedule which is hard to stick to if you are a stay at home mom like myself. They also ask for more forms and info and we are frequently asked to be a part of video chats or group chats where the same info is discussed in my opinion. I have also been asked to be a part of 2 specialty teams, and while flattering, I still make the EXACT same hourly rate that I started with. Even though I have stayed in good standing. Part-time stylists are replaceable and we are never incentivized. I even thought of leaving for a few months and coming back and they told me I would have to be re-hired as if I was a new candidate. I do not feel valued by Stitch Fix and my long-standing relationships with my clients all over the country do not seem that important to them.

    Advice to Management

    You need to value your senior stylists particularly ones that have been around since the beginning. Someone needs to come up with incentives for tenured stylists and you should realize that it DOES matter to clients when their stylist suddenly disappears. I realize that you have warm bodies lined up to do this job, but there are also a lot more competitors too.

  8. "Great in every way!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Stitch Fix full-time

    Pros

    Great coworkers, pay, and benefits!

    Cons

    I can't think of any!


  9. Helpful (6)

    "Stylist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Stylist
    Current Employee - Stylist
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Stitch Fix part-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Flexible schedule, work when you want. Great as a second career later in life.

    Cons

    Lower pay, restricted hours, too little time to effectively style clients. Also, clientele is generally mean. Feedback sent via app or online and they frequently insult you. They barely write a note about their needs and then slam you for not getting it right. Inventory sucks. It's nearly May, and there are winter coats, sweaters, long sleeve knits and then straight to halter tops. Somehow we missed short sleeves.

    Advice to Management

    Buyers are missing the mark. Listen to your stylists.


  10. "Senior stylist"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Stitch Fix part-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Pretty easy, flexible hours and decent pay (for retail)

    Cons

    The day to day can get pretty monotonous. Work alone- no social interaction


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