TNTP Teaching Fellows "tntp" Reviews | Glassdoor

TNTP Teaching Fellows Employee Reviews about "tntp"

Updated May 26, 2018

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3.2
49%
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TNTP Teaching Fellows CEO Daniel Weisberg
Daniel Weisberg
0 Rating
Pros
  • "You will have a full time teaching position in the fall making full salary(in 9 reviews)

  • "In my experience, most of the fellows who made it through the summer training got jobs, made it through the next school year and received certification(in 8 reviews)

Cons
  • "In 2017, TNTP/TeachNOLA received(in 13 reviews)

  • "There is absolutely no support beyond the 6 week summer training(in 11 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "tntp"

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  1. Helpful (2)

    "Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles [one overcomes]"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Teaching Fellow in Charlotte, NC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at TNTP Teaching Fellows full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Booker T. Washington said it best in the quote above. TEACH Charlotte is all about PERSEVERANCE. The 10-month program is demanding (and at times the deadlines, feedback and expectations are overwhelming/unrealistic). However, you earn a Standard Professional 1 teaching license in 10 months (vs. the 3-year lateral entry program offered by CMS), while earning a full-time paycheck and benefits during the school year. You also have unlimited access to district leaders, training and instructional support in CMS' Special Needs/Exceptional Children's Department.

    Cons

    TEACH Charlotte is a program that you'd LOVE TO HATE. Anyone who has gone through this program can share countless stories and opinions about " what could have," "should have" and "would have been better." At the end of the day, the program is about YOU and what YOU make of it. If you've been called to teach, then don't let anyone (your TEACH Charlotte coach, your instructors, or the staff) tell you any different. You know what they say about "opinions"...? Implement the feedback, take heed to the lessons learned and keep it moving =) Be prepared for A LOT of out-of-pocket expenses (e.g.: PRAXIS registration fees, PRAXIS study materials, gas/travel/lodging/food, printing ALL PST training materials, paper/teaching materials for summer school during PST, TNTP tuition after PST). Keep in mind that your student teaching is unpaid and it often takes more than one try to pass the PRAXIS. You also can't continue in PST unless you've passed the PRAXIS exam(s). .

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2014-05-18
  2. Helpful (11)

    "TeachNOLA is a scam - and a very racist one too"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at TNTP Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    You will meet a ton of people who have sacrificed everything to move down to the toilet of the country. I am only filling this out because Glassdoor makes you. New Orleans has its charm, but you do not want to live here. Great place to visit though.

    Cons

    Where do I begin? In 2017, TNTP/TeachNOLA received $1million from the US government to help recruit 900 teachers by 2020. The only money they spend on their fellows is on a very cheap bumper sticker and a notebook you can buy from the dollar store. They silence voices of color, deleting comments they don't agree with, while amplifying White women who run the training as "Directors." You are expected to pay for everything out of pocket, including copies, printer downloads of the numerous reading materials, and you are expected to scan and upload signed agreements of a handbook they don't even give you until the first day of pre-service training. You will be living off savings, expected to find your own job without any help from TNTP or TeachNOLA, and you're not even allowed to take off for interviews during training. This program has not provided anything to its fellows except a whole bunch of lies and effective marketing. They have a 100% placement rate because they cut the people they don't like. And you are still on the hook for the cost of the certification. So let me get this straight, you are teaching unpaid 12 hour days with food and transportation you procure with the possibility of being cut at any time for almost any reason - my question is what the hell does TNTP / TeachNOLA offer their fellows?? The White women who run this program will do whatever it takes to preserve and uphold White supremacy, so god help you if you're not with that program because you may find yourself one of the impoverished people stuck in Louisiana with no support system or way to get back home. Teach Like a Champion, their only textbook, written by a Harvard businessman, is a really racist book. I'll just leave it at that. Do your own research on that b.s. Instead of focusing on childhood development, trauma, educational theory, or social justice issues, the book and its accompanying horrifying videos show fellows how to teach Black children to sit up straight, pass papers back and forth, and other inane things with snaps of fingers like they are training dogs in obedience school. TNTP/TeachNOLA claims to be all about anti-bias and ending systemic racism, but those are just buzzwords on Powerpoint slides. There is no unpacking of any of that, and anything that makes the White people in charge uncomfortable gets dismissed, deleted, or minimized. There is no mention of salary, because God forbid the charter school system would ever be transparent about that, but I noticed a trend: the White fellows who show up to PST in business casual - even in skinny jeans and Sketchers - are the ones who get hired over the Black fellows who show up in three piece suits with more education and higher pedigrees. So, same stuff, different day. TNTP used to be in a lot more cities. They are only in 4 or 5 now. I wonder why. What's sad is the poor African-American students who have the honor of being lab rats by these corporate monsters in the name of educational reform.

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2018-05-26
  3. Helpful (8)

    "Take both these reviews and the propaganda with a grain of salt."

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Teacher in Washington, DC
    Recommends

    I have been working at TNTP Teaching Fellows for more than a year

    Pros

    The fastest, cheapest route to licensure. I decided to become a teacher in May, had a classroom and a full paycheck in August, and am now fully certified. In my experience, most of the fellows who made it through the summer training got jobs, made it through the next school year and received certification. I know some of the reviews here say you only have a 10% chance... that is too low, I think. At my summer site, about 55% of the fellows made it through the summer program, and about 80% of them got certification... so that's about a 44% pass rate for everyone, and if you don't count the ones who were clearly not cut out for teaching and dropped out early on, that rises to about 60%. Not amazing odds, but way better than 10%. I should note that my site had the highest drop-out rate that summer, but I think the ones who made it from my site did better the following school year, so I think these percentages are pretty close. You will meet some cool people and learn a lot about teaching... different things than you would learn from studying education.

    Cons

    The summer academy is really intense, and if you're making a lot of sacrifices to go through it, it's a big risk. About half of the fellows at my site dropped out or were cut during the summer, some on the very last day. I made it, just barely in "green," but it was the worst 6 weeks of my life. I was constantly sleep-deprived, stressed and anxious. There's some luck involved in terms of who you get as your site coordinator, your coach, your students, etc... and it stinks if you get dealt a bad hand and fail because of it. Some of the TNTP staff is really nice, but sometimes I felt like they were mocking us for struggling in the summer program when they had no idea (or had forgotten) how grueling and scary it was for us. Not sure whether this should be a "Pro" or a "Con," but a dirty little secret... you can end the summer on "Green" (pass) "Red" (instant fail if you go too far into red at any point to come back out) or "Yellow" (they'll think about it.) Basically, if you end on "Yellow," they'll pass you if you have a job lined up and fail you if you don't.

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2017-04-13
  4. Helpful (16)

    "“Intense and NOT worth it” Pre-service training 2016"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at TNTP Teaching Fellows full-time

    Pros

    This program uses “Teach Like a Champion” techniques which are good management strategies. My co-fellows were wonderful!

    Cons

    I’ll start with this disclaimer: I quit pre-service training 6 weeks into it. Before beginning the program, I read all the negative reviews but thought I would be one of the successful ones. While there are people who make it through all the way to licensure, I would say you have less than a 10% chance of getting your license in your first year. While this is a rough estimate, the fact that TNTP won’t release the percentage of how many fellows make it through is very concerning. So, my first suggestion to you, purely based on chance, is to find another program. Some state education departments offer “Alternative Route to Licensure Programs.” Or, you can get your teaching license online through “Western Governors University” which is fully accredited and very inexpensive. Right now I am working on my license and teaching full-time through one of these programs. If you’re still set on TNTP, seriously consider these cons: — Dishonest Recruitment: TNTP preys on idealistic individuals and hints that people who don’t make it through PST simply weren’t “cut out for it” or “weren’t willing to put in the effort.” While this may be true for a few, here is the reality: there is a HUGE variation in classrooms and in the individual support you will receive. Your chances of making it through PST depend on a variety of factors, not only your individual effort. So when they recruit you and basically say “you will be successful if you read Teach Like a Champion, believe in your students, and put in a lot of effort,” they are not being honest. They over-recruit knowing full-well that you have a good chance of not making it through PST. — Minimal teacher support: The first day I began teaching and most every day after, my students were out of control: screaming and running around the classroom. I seldom saw my coach. By the third day, management told my co-teacher and I that the problem was us and only us; we weren’t engaging the students enough. Yet, we didn’t have technology in our classroom, we didn’t have engaging materials or manipulatives, we were strongly discouraged from playing engaging games with the students and, most importantly, we didn't have another adult in the classroom to support us. When I told my coach that I didn't have enough money to buy more engaging materials she replied with a snobby "I spend at least $2,000 a year on my class!" Of course, she has a salary. In my opinion, it is completely, and morally wrong to throw inexperienced teachers into this type of environment with so little support. Now that I’m a full-time teacher in another program, I look back in disbelief at the way TNTP treated me and other fellows. In conclusion, run far away and look elsewhere. TNTP causes potentially promising, good teachers to leave the profession and never look back. So sad for students who would have benefited from these forward-thinking, change-oriented individuals. I’m honestly disgusted by the TNTP program.

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2017-01-25
  5. "Don´t do it unless you know the facts"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Anonymous Intern 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at TNTP Teaching Fellows

    Pros

    Most of the people (other Fellows and Coaches) were awesome! Some of the techiques they teach you are helpful in the classroom.

    Cons

    Poorly organized. Be aware that although they boast a 100% placement rate, that is only for the Fellows that make it through PST! If you are borderline and might seem like you might not be hired, you WILL NOT make it through PST and will fail the course. Also, management of this summer´s program was so poor that several coaches (including mine) quit the program halfway through the summer. Some of the coaches are aware of how challenging teaching summer school in DC urban schools can be and go out of their way to ensure that their assigned Fellows make it through the program while others may go through the motions but don´t really do much else to help. Also, the school and class you are assigned is random, and no account is taken for whether you are in a more challenging school/grade level or not, nor is any account taken of your progress in the program or the effort you put in. When you are being assessed you have to act the part without regard to your students´ needs for that period of time, because if you do not fit into the TNTP mold you will FAIL the program and all the time and money you have invested (normally upwards of $5,000 or more) will be irrevocably lost (as you are not paid to teach summer school and receive no stipend - not even towards travel costs - to help you out financially). Think VERY CAREFULLY before you commit to participate in this program as there are no guarantees and you might be out a considerable amount of money based on a single assessor´s capice.

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2016-08-21
  6. Helpful (22)

    "Essentially a Scam"

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    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at TNTP Teaching Fellows

    Pros

    I do not have anything to write here, but the website is insisting I fill in this field to submit my review.

    Cons

    This program is, in its very essence, a scam. Yes, people make it through this program and become certified teachers, and this is surely how they keep it running. The reality is that the majority of the people will be forced out before they are able to make it to the end of the program or the end of their first school year. I could conservatively estimate that fewer than 10% of our original cohort made it through to the end, and out of these, the percent that actually received their certification is even lower. As I attended meetings with less and less people in them, it became painfully apparently that all they were here do was take as much money from us as possible and then leave us to drown. It was sickening to see. I URGE you to reconsider if you're considering joining any of the TNTP cohorts. When I was choosing which certification program to join I saw all of the negative TNTP reviews and naively thought that it would somehow be different for me. Well, I was wrong. Again, if you are considering joining a TNTP cohort I strongly advise you to look into all other options first. I would not recommend TNTP anyone.

    TNTP Teaching Fellows2016-07-09
  7. Helpful (7)

    "Wish it was possible to give 0 stars."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at TNTP Teaching Fellows

    Pros

    In theory, getting certified in a year sounds nice. I also met some of the greatest people through this program.

    Cons

    Where to start... There is absolutely no support beyond the 6 week summer training. TNTP assigns "virtual" coaches that live around the country. My coach had 60 other fellows to coach and as you could imagine, could not coach any of us in the way that a first year teacher in the inner city needs. My suggestion- find another program or go back and get your masters. Don't waste your time or money here. This company is all about making money and don't care if you succeed or not.

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2016-06-25
  8. Helpful (18)

    "Exploitative - of Teachers and Students"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Teaching Fellow in Charlotte, NC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at TNTP Teaching Fellows full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    I met and worked alongside real teachers- and some of the best human beings I've known - at my school.

    Cons

    Exploitative Unhelpful Misleading Callous REMEMBER: - TNTP gets +/- $1,000,000 grants from school districts to provide and train new teachers. By end of summer, there were no more than 50 teachers who passed PST. Out of 120+. Some of these left in the first week of school, utterly unprepared. - New teachers move from all over the country to train during summer. Many leave their jobs and commit fully to teaching. Training is role-playing and repeating by rote certain phrases and reactions, especially from "Teach Like a Champion." Lost $ -Teachers then placed in a summer-school classroom. My training was in a high school. The main teacher did not have any lesson/curriculum planned. No guidance. I never saw a full lesson in my content area over the summer training. I never met an experienced teacher in my specialty and grade level over the summer (or for my whole time teaching). I struggled with lesson planning, but was given no models of successful lessons to read and watch. Yes, we saw excerpts. No, we never saw a full lesson with real students. -Teach unpaid for hours each morning, train in afternoon, plan lessons at night. No chance to retrieve lost income over summer. The teaching and planning requires us to impart a semester's worth of learning to our students in 12 days of summer school. At the end of every session, the main teacher passed her students based on who had showed up every day and marginally attempted the worksheets she gave. When we weren't teaching, we all sat in the field room, planning lessons and supervised by 1 or other coach. -Encouraged to take a job at the first school that offers to hire, not to reflect or question fit at school. Some teachers miserable. -No actual training in content area during summer or schoolyear. Instead, we had online learning modules about lesson planning on "Blackboard." In PST, we spent hours sitting in a classroom together staring at screens, reading breakdowns of NexGen standards and watching snippets of classroom videos. Never even saw a video of a full lesson. -The work for the modules is involved but mostly busy work. During schoolyear, it takes 3-8 hrs that can be poorly spared from a busy schedule. When projects are turned in, 4 tepid comments maximum, mostly praise. No advice on how to improve, even though I described in detail the challenges my students and I face. -Most of my students had no concept of foundational standards to our grade level. I was docked points in 1st observation because the lesson was remedial. Kids did not know what atoms, or phases pf matter were, but I was supposed to stick to the standard on kinetic theory rather than have a review lesson. Even though it was remedial was aligned to the grade level standard; the observer did not know or understand my content area. -No support is provided in the school-year, beyond ~20 min bimonthly "coaching" meetings - No advocacy for teachers -For all this, you get to pay $5,500 tuition. I was buying breakfast, pencils, supplies on top of paying off the cost of moving, settling in a new city, rent, student loans. $550 is my groceries for 2+ months. I had a passion for teaching and loved my kids. However, I did not receive support or guidance. I still have never seen a full lesson in my content area (whether to adults or children). I spent hours on lesson plans. By Christmas, the other teacher in my content area had resigned. For 2 months I planned for both classes and differentiated for his EC kids. There was no recognition of this extra work or support when I described my stress and need for advice. I was inadequate. I was a new teacher with 150 kids of my own whom I loved, but who also had immense challenges. The other teachers at the school could commiserate, but not help. My coach gave a couple tepid sentences of advice when I asked her about lesson planning, teaching kids who could not read or speak English. I resigned. I am still on the hook for the rest of the $5,500 and am getting calls. By my calculations, TNTP already got almost $20,000 per new teacher from the school district for this school year. They put new, idealistic teachers with insufficient training into classrooms. My coach had about 10 other trainee teachers in our Blackboard group. Where is all the district's money going? Certainly not serving the students. The first response from the coordinator in my area after I told TNTP I was resigning? "Even if you resign you still have to pay the full $5,500." I never mentioned the tuition.

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2016-06-08
  9. Helpful (9)

    "Great Coaching, Horrible Practices"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New Orleans, LA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at TNTP Teaching Fellows full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    -Great in-the-field coaching from teaching professionals -(Seemingly) very organized -Friendly staff -Ability to get your M.S. in Education from the best school in the country, JHU -Coaching at your job -Helps you find a job -Relationship-with-kids driven

    Cons

    -Quit/fired? No problem. They still want your $4,500 and will be down your throat to collect -Feedback is GREAT during pre-service training. It's contradictory during your in-service coaching -Coach will SHUN you if you are fired (you'll never hear from him/her again) -TNTP will defend the school before they defend you as one of their members -Some graders score much more harshly than others -MANY members are fired/quit, but they won't tell you that -Remember, it's a BUSINESS first, a NON-PROFIT second--they just really want your $ -I wouldn't trust the numbers/stats they show you at PST -Work/life balance is non-existent

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2015-12-29
  10. Helpful (23)

    "Worst experience of my life"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at TNTP Teaching Fellows

    Pros

    The fellows themselves are all wonderful. I made friends with genuine people who wanted to change lives and were willing to switch careers because they wanted to make a difference.

    Cons

    Quitting my job to be a part of this program was the worst decision I ever made. No one who works for them is interested in serving underprivileged students. Most of the coaches and managers were there to be promoted in their own careers. They use the promise of a fast road to teaching to lure people from across the country into leaving their jobs while saying 85-90% pass Pre-Service training. The truth is, 50% are cut or drop out throughout training and another 25% are let go. The way the employees speak to the fellows is demeaning. Imagine being on a job interview every day for 6 weeks straight where the interviewers talk to you like a child and send you home with 4-5 hours of homework after working a 10 hour day. The content area assignment is seemingly completely random. I was assigned to teach a class that I had no background in and as a result, did not know how to teach. These students deserve better than unqualified teachers with no experience. Also, if you do get cut from the program, they'll dump you via email with no explanation. Classy. I just hope as their application for next summer opens up that I save someone the trouble, money, and unnecessary frustration that I experienced this summer. Research your options and read up on the research about TFA and TNTP grads. None of these programs are helping anyone but themselves.

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    TNTP Teaching Fellows2015-08-22
Found 13 reviews