Target Design Assistant Reviews | Glassdoor

Target Design Assistant Reviews

2 reviews

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Design Assistant

4.0
StarStarStarStarStar
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
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Brian Cornell
0 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • "Can be difficult to find a good work/life balance" (in 1587 reviews)

  • "Hours were inconsistent for most team members" (in 1684 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Great first job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Assistant Designer in Minneapolis, MN
    Current Employee - Assistant Designer in Minneapolis, MN
    Recommends

    I have been working at Target full-time

    Pros

    Target competes on price + design, so their PD&D process it really sophisticated. It is a wonderful place to gain experience and work with talented people.

    Cons

    What makes a great designer does not always make a great manager. Aim for a lean team with strong leadership that way you will learn a lot.


  2. Helpful (3)

    "For recent college grads, it's like going back to high school."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Assistant Designer in Minneapolis, MN
    Former Employee - Assistant Designer in Minneapolis, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Target full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    • Decent pay for entry level designers.
    • Exposure to different aspects of business through cross-functional team meetings.
    • A recognized name for your resume.

    Cons

    • Corporate culture revolves around superficial gossip, fitting in, and kissing ass.
    • Not a results-oriented environment, meaning your work will not be able to speak for itself.
    • Interest in other aspects or divisions at the company is discouraged as being outside of your "area of expertise" aka "AOE".
    • You have to constantly communicate with absurd, buzz-word language.