The Art Institutes Reviews in Houston, TX | Glassdoor

The Art Institutes Houston Reviews

26 reviews

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Houston, TX Area

2.8
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The Art Institutes President George Sebolt
George Sebolt
3 Ratings

26 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Terrible Management and no work/life balance (in 30 reviews)

  • No room for growth, constant downsizing (in 16 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Full Time Instructor/Teacher"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Lead Teacher in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Lead Teacher in Houston, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at The Art Institutes full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Positive thinking Teachers always willing to share their knowledge

    Cons

    Teachers were not respected for their real worth to the College in the earlier days of operation!

    Advice to Management

    Your Teachers/Instructors are your Backbone Strength of your organization


  2. "Art Institute of Houston"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Senior Lecturer in Houston, TX
    Current Employee - Senior Lecturer in Houston, TX

    I have been working at The Art Institutes full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    The student-to-instructor ratio is low with good interaction with students.

    Cons

    quarter system
    four hour class blocks

  3. "Could be better"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Median Analyst in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Median Analyst in Houston, TX
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Art Institutes part-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    There is enough room to grow within the company. The culture is relaxed, and there are quite a few helpful challenges to overcome!

    Cons

    As markets change, so does the scope of your job. You might have to assume two or more additional functions to compensate.


  4. Helpful (1)

    "Good Start"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Network Administrator in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Network Administrator in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    Pros

    People, Experience, Opportunity, Food, Technology

    Cons

    Less interaction, and Management, very corporate

    Advice to Management

    cherish your hard working employees


  5. "Not a bad start"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Recruiter in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Recruiter in Houston, TX
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Art Institutes full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Flexibility of schedules since you work on a high school schedule. Early end to your workdays.

    Cons

    Super early rises, sometimes as early as 5am to commute to schools and be on time for first period presentations.

    Advice to Management

    Better pay for high school reps would reduce the high turnover.


  6. "Never a dull moment in the tutoring center"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Student Tutor in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Student Tutor in Houston, TX

    I worked at The Art Institutes part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Work scheduling flexible around class times. Diverse student body and majors allows you to network with your fellow peers you're tutoring. Each hour of each day brings a different tutoring challenge.

    Cons

    Short handed on tutors of varied expertise. The bulk of students ask for last minute help to do an entire project from the beginning but is due in a few hours from when they walk in. Usually happened during midterms and finals. Volume of students seeking tutoring around these times often meant I was on my feet and talking nonstop for 4 hours straight.


  7. "The Ai in Houston admissions was the worst job I've had."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Art Institutes full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    It's a simple job to understand. The pay is decent. But, there's really not much else good to say about it.

    Cons

    Management severely lacked in empathy, support, direction, and motivation. The hours are long and you end up working most Saturdays and holidays.

    Advice to Management

    Listen to your employees. Don't treat them like they're disposable.

  8. "Only if you are desperate or need work experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Comp & Benefits
    Former Employee - Front Desk in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Front Desk in Houston, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at The Art Institutes full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    You can make friends with co-workers easily, but be careful. Friendly environment. Don't have to use brain power although that is also a con because it makes you a zombie. Glad I got some full-time work experience. The students can be sweet, especially the culinary ones who let you taste their food.

    Cons

    They are supposed to rotate working holidays for support staff, but they don't. And if there is a holiday party, the front desk worker doesn't get to go until they are cleaning up and only gets about 5-10 minutes whereas everyone else had a couple hours off. Also, supposed to have a set lunch hour, but that never happens. Lunch hour will be whenever the back up feels like coming to relieve you and that could be 6 and a half hours into your 8 hour shift. Supposed to get 2 15 minute breaks, but no one will ever tell you that because no one wants to have to cover for you. Horrible lack of communication even within departments. No one ever knows what is going on. People working in the back don't answer the phone or are late or leave early so you have to deal with angry students/parents all day. If you get up to use the restroom, people freak out- get over it. Also, the "raise" you get is a little more than a quarter...

    Advice to Management

    Include everyone all of the time, even your support staff. They are the ones making things flow smoothly for you.


  9. Helpful (2)

    "Amazing experience to launch a career (at a small price)"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Houston, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    You will learn a ton in this job -- recruiting, interviewing, reaching goals, teamwork/leadership, problem solving, sales, relationship building, adaptability, time management... The Houston location has a beautiful school, successful programs and wonderful faculty. There is work-life balance in the sense that when you go home, you don't take your work with you. However, when you are in the office, you really need to know how to manage your time and work very hard. I don't think I would have the career I have today if it weren't for my time here.

    Cons

    Proprietary school systems like the Art Institutes often receive bad press. Some of it is rightfully earned, and some not. Still, it is a big hit to employees' morale to hear negative things about your employer and the type of work you are doing. It is ALL about hitting your numbers (getting a certain number of students each start date) which means you sometimes have students sign up who probably shouldn't. In other words, unlike other respectable institutions of higher education, it's not about finding the best and most qualified student; it's about finding any student you can to sign on the dotted line and fork over a non-refundable $50 applicant fee. Of course, there are plenty of Admissions representatives who do their job well... and right... and only sign up students in good conscious. Doing it that way, however, takes much longer to hit your goals than just letting any old Joe Schmuck in the door. There were definitely Admissions reps who would persuade a student to sign up who they KNEW couldn't afford the tuition and/or wouldn't excel, but they did it anyway to hit their goals. It just made you feel icky sometimes.

    Advice to Management

    The management team at the Houston location is actually pretty good. I received a ton of mentorship and professional development. I also worked hard and hit goals -- if you aren't hitting your goals, your manager will breathe down your neck.


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Good stepping stone, great people"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Assistant Director of Admissions in Houston, TX

    I worked at The Art Institutes full-time

    Pros

    Good starting pay and raise structure
    Great people and fun environment
    Nice campus to show to prospective students

    Cons

    Stress creating pressure to bring in students
    Knowing lots of students will not succeed and will be in debt with nothing to show for it.
    The school attracts students that do not have the drive or resources to stick it out. There are success stories though.

    Advice to Management

    Less focus on profit and more focus on building the quality of the school to attract more dependable and high achieving students.


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