The Humane Society of the United States "animals" Reviews | Glassdoor

The Humane Society of the United States Employee Reviews about "animals"

Updated Dec 3, 2019

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3.3
61%
Recommend to a Friend
85%
Approve of CEO
The Humane Society of the United States President and CEO Kitty Block
Kitty Block
12 Ratings
Pros
  • "I loved interning with the HSUS(in 18 reviews)

  • "Flexible, dogs at work, nice people(in 11 reviews)

Cons
  • "Work/life balance, Low pay, Old building(in 16 reviews)

  • "If you complain about the working conditions then you just don't care enough about animals(in 14 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "animals"

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  1. "Animal Care"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Humane Society of the United States

    Pros

    An amazing experience Loved working at the Humane Society

    Cons

    Must love dogs and cats Lots of menial tasks like cleaning up after animals

    The Humane Society of the United States2015-11-25
  2. "too many animals not enough help"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Freelancer - Kennel Assistant 
    Recommends

    I worked at The Humane Society of the United States

    Pros

    caring volunteers loving environment for the animals' dogs Temperament rehabilitation Socialization with the animals adoption process

    Cons

    overwhelmed staff too many animals

    The Humane Society of the United States2019-12-03
  3. Helpful (1)

    "Leaves you feeling accomplished and helpful"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Volunteer 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at The Humane Society of the United States part-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Of course, the animals, friendly staff that are always willing to help, seeing animals you know you helped get adopted into a family, saving lives.

    Cons

    You can be on your feet a lot, sometimes the sights can be sad (animals rescued from abuse or neglect), and some days you might feel a little overworked.

    The Humane Society of the United States2019-04-12
  4. Helpful (2)

    "A great org, getting better and stronger every day"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Campaign Specialist 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at The Humane Society of the United States full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    HSUS is hands down the most effective animal advocacy organization in the world, impacting countless laws for animals and influencing countless corporations to shift towards more humane policies. The org is well known for it's organized ability to positive create change for animals with excellent donor support to continue its work far into the future.

    Cons

    Internally, the organization struggled to keep up with its quick growth over the years and suffered many inexcusable HR issues as a result -- some that were highly publicized to the detriment of the organization. HSUS has since hired a third party legal group to help overhaul the organizations cultures and values in order to find resolutions to previous problems and to prevent future struggles. A more dedicated and transparent leadership in in place now, who prioritize the care of their hard working staff, which is critical for the hundreds of employees who are committed to their work on behalf of the animals and continue to share a passion for the organizations mission, despite recent struggles.

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    The Humane Society of the United States2019-03-06
  5. Helpful (30)

    "An Incredibly Disappointing & Telling Look Into Non-Profits"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Gaithersburg, MD
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at The Humane Society of the United States full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    I love the Pets in the Workplace program, its a major stress relief to be able to pet a dog if you're having a particularly stressful day. There are some incredibly dedicated people who work here that will work tirelessly for all animals. My immediate supervisor has been one of the most supportive people I have ever reported to, a mentor I'm sure I will have for years to come.

    Cons

    Where to begin... There is an influx of under-qualified people that are in management/senior management positions and most often, these people ended up in those positions as a result of "connections" they have with leadership (whether that be sexual, nepotism etc) There is a gross amount of money that gets wasted each year on ineffective fundraising tactics but no one seems to take notice of this. If you come from a "for-profit" background I would suggest avoiding this "non-profit," your methods of ensuring a solid ROI etc. will fall on deaf ears (which is largely due to the complete lack of knowledge of the under qualified managers) There is a toxic idea here that "it works, that's why we do it this way" which makes it incredibly difficult to affect any sort of innovation or change to the way things are done. It you enjoy working as a team towards a common goal, this is not the place for it. There is a serious problem with teams being siloed despite being from the same department. The silos are a recipe for disaster when attempting to get things done. I personally felt mislead in my interview, I was told I would be handling many tasks and using my skills daily, the reality? My job is a lot of dealing with 3rd parties that are doing the work that could very easily be done in-house and for a better price. There is so much more that could be said but voicing concerns here or even within the organization has proven to be worthless. The employees that are doing the work daily are the least of the concern of HSUS, especially in light of the investigation of our CEO...I'll just sit back and watch hoping someone will finally do something positive in this organization so we can get back to the mission of fighting for all animals.

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    The Humane Society of the United States2018-01-31
  6. Helpful (27)

    "Great for animals, not so much for people"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Humane Society of the United States full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Great cause, meaningful work, good benefits

    Cons

    There are a lot, sadly. Management - Bad managers are a huge problem. I left because of a terrible experience working for an unqualified manager who spent 40 hours a week micromanaging and harassing me. The sad thing is that this same manager pushed out another employee right before me. We both cited this manager's unacceptable behavior and treatment as a reason for leaving; nothing was done. I know multiple employees who have left due to bad managers. And these were good, smart, valuable employees. HSUS promotes people to management without qualification, even if they have a reputation for being difficult, and then it seems they are unwilling to demote them when they prove to be ineffective and even hostile managers. Their HR department is HUGE but massively ineffective. Their staff is all leaving because of bad managers. They are losing talent and ultimately this makes them less effective at helping animals because they're pushing out passionate, driven people with mismanagement. Which is easy to fix: If someone is a bad manager and you get multiple complaints, or people always leave after working under a certain person, do not let the manage employees. This is not hard! Culture - A few other reviews have mentioned the culture of "chosen ones." It's true. If you're young, white, thin, extroverted and attractive -- this is the place for you! You'll go far. If you're older, fat, a person of color, shy or quiet and not a social butterfly -- you'll be ignored and then you'll be pushed out. Or you'll work for decades with no acknowledgement and then quietly retire. There is also a racist undercurrent to the HSUS; there are programs that deal with poverty and pets in Black and Hispanic communities, but they are created by and run by white folks and POC are simply tokens they hire to do outreach. (And the white folks train the POC on how to speak to people in their own community.) I sat through so many meetings with nice white ladies talking to other nice white ladies about the right way to talk to Black people. It was infuriating. The place is also, by and large, totally run by women. But who is at the top? White dudes in nice suits. They pointed over and over again to the number of female VPs and managers but the place has so many VPs and managers those titles are essentially meaningless, and at the end of the day, they all report back to the white men in suits. Pay - Well below the industry standard. I worked there for years, and was "promoted" to a position that had a $0.20 raise per year. TWENTY CENTS. Per year. This was my raise. I was also coached (by management) never to talk about money at yearly reviews or even at interviews for new positions. People don't talk about what they make, but even those in management positions struggle and have to take on side gigs to survive. It's taboo, and HR supports that culture because they know they are underpaying their program staff. Instability - There are so many staff shake-ups and department shifts here that it never really felt stable. I swear there were about 3 big "shifts" in the time I worked there, so it was about 1 shake-up per year. It was always with the intent of making things better and more effective but then things would just move back to the status quo and everyone would settle in just in time for another shake-up. It's a waste of time, and I got tired of seeing these big shifts that were really just for show because leaders did not want to examine the root causes of these issues, because it would mean taking a long hard look in the mirror. So they just changed the names of departments and split them up into sections instead. Leaving broke my heart, because this was my dream job, but it was necessary for my mental health.

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    The Humane Society of the United States2017-09-27
  7. Helpful (34)

    "A nonprofit failing its greatest asset: people"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Gaithersburg, MD
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Humane Society of the United States full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    I’d estimate there’s three types of people who read Glassdoor reviews: one, jobseekers, hoping to learn more about the company or organization they’d like to work for; two, current employees wondering how their workplace is reflected in Glassdoor, maybe hoping that their personal feelings are reflected in the words of others; three, people in power at an organization who are curious about employee feelings or trying to do damage control. I worked for HSUS for over five years. It was, in many ways, the best job I ever had and I still miss it every single day. I truly defined my career there. I worked every day with people who became my best friends. I was able to bring my dog to work, and see other dogs every single day, which is as awesome as you think it is. I worked hard to save animals — a lifelong passion for me transformed further when I became a vegan — because animal cruelty is horrifying and impossible to ignore when you’re that close to it. And HSUS is working tirelessly to stop it. But. The Nonprofit Times recently released their “2017 Best Nonprofits to Work For” article, in which they identified what they call the “top 10 key drivers for employees across the 50 organizations.” They ranked things like leadership and planning, corporate culture and communications, overall satisfaction, pay and benefits. I’d like to give my personal view of these key drivers and where HSUS falls among them.

    Cons

    I feel I am valued in this organization: HSUS overworks and underpays. This is well-known; almost every review you’ll read here mentions it. “Valued,” to me, means something different, though: it means how work is seen by superiors, how you are treated by executives and fellow staff, how you’re recognized and communicated to about your work and contributions to the organization. People, myself included, leave HSUS because they don’t feel valued by superiors or executives. How a nonprofit in 2017 can hew so closely to the “cogs in a machine” model is baffling. My team had massive, transformative success in their field while I worked there — but that success went consistently unnoticed and unrecognized — and in fact, expertise challenged on almost every topic imaginable. It was assumed anyone could achieve similar success — that the person didn’t matter as much as the buttons getting pushed putting out decrees from executives. Strategy and experience were pushed aside, and instead, it was all about the next thing, about how that wasn’t good enough HSUS has experienced overwhelming attrition over the last few years. Not because people don’t feel passionate about the cause, or don’t like their coworkers. HSUS does not value its employees. Full stop. I have confidence in the leadership of this organization; If we are to trust our organization’s leaders, they need to trust their employees. If employees are hired for their expertise, executives should trust that expertise. Public relation blunders aside, related to reshuffling the golden children (read: “boys club” is real, and going strong at HSUS!) rather than deal with their inappropriate behavior, leaders have no confidence in the people doing the work. They value instead outside opinions from vendors and agencies who gouge them endlessly — donor dollars, mind you — and sycophants who hang on, barnacle-like, willfully ignorant of how others feel or that there’s a culture problem because they are “in” with executives. Leaders at HSUS have no confidence in their staff enough to foster, steward and retain employees — how can staff have confidence in them? I like the type of work that I do; Point in favor: I loved the work I did at HSUS. This kept me there far longer than I should have stayed and boy howdy does HSUS know exactly how to take advantage of that! Most days, I feel I have made progress at work; Are you working 10+ hours a day? And available at night, and on weekends? If you struggle with work/life boundaries, HSUS will take that to the extreme. And if you respect your boundaries, you aren’t committed to the cause. Even when progress is made, or a team achieves success, if that success doesn’t fall into an executive’s “pet project,” or isn’t something they understand, or doesn’t personally reflect positively on them — or doesn’t fit within the extraordinarily narrow scope of leadership’s myopic worldview, it isn’t progress. Everything is a priority. Work is piled on endlessly without respect for workload or prioritization. Want to focus on something? Too bad; on to the next thing. And the next. Oh, and while you’re at it, here’s breaking news you had no idea was coming until you had to be on a conference call at 12p on a Sunday. It’s often incredibly hard to feel like you’re making progress when you work in animal issues. Animals are suffering and dying every single day, everywhere around the world, and most of the public achieves the cognitive dissonance to allow that to continue. The people who work at HSUS should feel like they re making progress as they address this issue; they are among the hardest working people I’ve ever met. However, it isn’t there. At this organization, employees have fun at work; When among my team, yes. Many of my direct superiors worked overtime to provide some value and investment in my team — aware of work/life balance, boundaries, personal time, etc. That was difficult when not supported or invested in ways beyond that team. Without those people often killing themselves to rectify the otherwise suffering culture at HSUS, I’m not sure who would be left. I can trust what this organization tells me; I learned to trust that promises often went unfulfilled, concerns unaddressed and unlistened to. I trust that HSUS is working on their mission — but as far as executives and HR go, there was no trust. Overall, I’m satisfied with this organization’s benefits package; HSUS pays poorly and their HR is a mess; you can read any review here to find that out so I won’t repeat it. Promotions are fought for with tooth and nail, and during my tenure there, were often miniscule. Instead of investing in employees, they have to kill themselves to fight for career growth and raises. Or title changes. A colleague was told, “If you aren’t happy with this offer, you can keep doing your current job.” Benefits are fine. Flexibility is available, which is a plus. You’ll need it, because you’ll be expected to be available 24/7. There is room for me to advance at this organization; The gap between middle management and executives is endless; it’s a canyon from which decrees are made and minions are left to do the work. You might get a minuscule raise, but you won’t get that title change. Or vice versa! It’ll be a surprise, just like the offer letter you’ll get with no room for negotiation; take it or leave it. Many of my middle management colleagues worked double time to get their work done and also protect their employees from the unrealistic expectation of executives, especially as teams grew smaller, budgets were cut, people were fired, and revenue goals or project goals or priorities did not change or evolve to adapt to new circumstances. And since executives are so completely out of touch with middle management and employee satisfaction, they are left to do their best to try to retain employees who take their marketable skills and go elsewhere — for more money, personal time, and investment. So really, at HSUS, the room for advancement is often through the exit. I like the people I work with at this organization; As I mentioned before: I worked on the same team with people who became my best friends. Lifelong friends. I still miss them every single day — and without everything else on this list, I would still be at HSUS. However: I have also never been spoken to or behaved toward the way I was when I worked at HSUS. Many people are rude, downright mean or cruel, and dismissive. Sometimes contemptuous. Some of this has to do with the fact people are overworked and underpaid; some of it falls under the banner of lack of boundaries and “dedication to mission only.” Executives included — and some are the worst offenders at all: some play on their multiple phones while employees are given presentations, told their expertise doesn’t matter and that they know better, shut down, demeaned and made to feel insufficient, unqualified, under performing and pushed aside. I’ve been in my new job for nearly a year, and I can say no one here has ever treated me once the way I was treated regularly at HSUS and felt. My new job has never made me cry or feel worthless — that’s a huge plus! I feel part of a team working toward a shared goal. Again: on my team, yes — without a doubt. As part of the larger organization, I didn’t feel part of a team as much as a means to an end. I stayed because for a long time, that end (working to save animals) justified the means (see above). Eventually, I realized that unless or until I was part of the executive team, that would never happen. And that executive team is closed off in an ivory tower of unrealistic expectations and no true knowledge of how to run a successful business with happy employees.

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    The Humane Society of the United States2017-05-13

    The Humane Society of the United States Response

    June 14, 2017SVP Human Capital and and Development

    As the new Senior Vice President of the Human Capital department, I appreciate your feedback. I’d like to address the themes in your comments, as many are dependent on each other. Regarding advancement and benefits; The Human Capital department is undergoing a restructure and also is bringing in more staff to add to capacity in to the area of compensation, as well as in organization and management development. In this manner, there will be there will be a revitalized focus on customer service to internal and external stake holders and employees. On the compensation front, it is a myth that an employee must receive a promotion or higher level opportunity in order to receive an adjustment to pay. There are many circumstances that can warrant an increase. For example, if an employee has a significant increase in the scope of their job, a revised salary may occur. When it comes to determining a salary, the amount that is budgeted specifically for that position incorporates the level of skill, the candidate’s experience and education, and the competitive market for that position. As we expand in capacity for organization and management development, which is a direct result of our employees requesting that we allocate more resources to that area, we hope to engage staff at all levels so that they receive training and support to not only excel in their current roles, but grow at the organization, whether that be in the scope of their job or beyond that. Being newer at the organization, I cannot speak to the culture in years past, however the examples you cite of employee behavior in meetings are ones that can only be addressed if they are shared via appropriate channels. In some cases that would be your supervisor and in other cases it would be the Human Capital department. With the expanding in capacity for organizational and management development, the goal is that supervisors receive the training needed to handle those situations and to reinforce when they should be escalated, though of course the latter is always an option. As with most nonprofits that have an advocacy focus, in particular those that focus on life or death issues as The HSUS does, the work/life balance is difficult and something that we as an organization will continue to work on. As an organization that grew very quickly in the early 2000s, the last several years were ones with significant changes in culture and also in decisions on where resources would be focused. This was done to position us to continue to be so effective for animals, and to also ensure our employees have the resources to do their work (and expand those resources in the future). These are all ongoing processes, and while I cannot speak directly to what you experienced in your time here, I can assure you that these are issues and areas we continue to focus and look to improve on going forward.

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  8. Helpful (28)

    "Get out while you can"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Humane Society of the United States full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Amazing employees who work tirelessly on behalf of animals. Some of the most compassionate, caring, hard working people I've ever had the pleasure of working with. They are the only saving grace on this sinking ship.

    Cons

    This organization is a shell of what it was, all thanks to terrible leadership, especially from the CEO and CDO who have effectively run the organization straight into the ground. HSUS used to be the penultimate organization for those wanting to work in the animal welfare world. Now it's a sad, crumbling mess. It is the hard workers who work tirelessly for this organization and the animals who suffer at the hands of continually poor financial and organizational decisions made by the C-suite. Top talent has left in droves and staff are expected to pick up the slack both in terms of work and financial stability by being told to do their part and ask their friends and family for donations. The person who's supposed to be leading the charge for bringing in money for the organization is ironically one of the biggest reasons why the organization is in such shambles financially. No surprise there when you look at her track record. This is a great place to work if you're looking for an organization that doesn't care about its employees, excels in favoritism and is wrought with overpaid, ineffective executive leadership. But if you're looking for a fulfilling job where you're appreciated and make a difference, I'd suggest looking elsewhere. It wasn't always this way sadly.

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    The Humane Society of the United States2016-10-15
  9. Helpful (17)

    "Should have been my dream job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     in Gaithersburg, MD
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Humane Society of the United States

    Pros

    The organization has a great mission and is making incredible strides for animals. Most of the people who work at HSUS are incredibly talented and mission driven. You can bring your dog to work!!

    Cons

    Where to start? There is zero work/life balance. You are required to be on call at all times and are not compensated for it. The pay is abysmal on all levels. Upper management does not make taking care of their employees a priority. If you complain about the working conditions then you just don't care enough about animals. As a manager, I was not allowed to reward my high performing employees with raises or promotions; therefore my best employees left--as did I eventually. There is very little strategy, and if there is, it is not communicated out of the C-Suite, leaving employees to flounder and scramble to achieve arbitrary goals. There is also a culture of bullying that is allowed to thrive. People with very high titles yell at, demean and have no respect for others. And there is no accountability for this poor behavior. When people see Vice Presidents, and higher, behaving this way they learn that the only way to succeed at HSUS is to also be a bully.

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    The Humane Society of the United States2016-02-10
  10. Helpful (10)

    "Lots of gender discrimination!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Director 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at The Humane Society of the United States full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Occasionally you get to experience helping animals hands on. The majority of the people who work for the organization genuinely care.

    Cons

    Though HR tries to disguise the fact that this is a male driven organization by promoting women to middle management positions, the truth is that only males in the organization have the ability to make meaningful decisions. Except for executive staff, or people who are the President's friends from the Fund for Animals - the majority of the staff are grossly underpaid (though again, HR tries to hide this by telling staff that HSUS pays at the correct mark rate.) The organization has no strategy and the men who lead the organization consistently make poor decisions about how to utilize donor dollars. Accounting practices can be described only as sketchy at best. Several departments consistently spend well over budget without any ramifications. Further, many times donor money that has been restricted to specific departments and / or issues is moved to executives' pet projects without appropriate communication with donors.

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    The Humane Society of the United States2015-11-25
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