The Oregonian Reviews | Glassdoor

The Oregonian Reviews

Updated February 11, 2017
46 reviews

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2.1
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N. Christian Anderson
15 Ratings

46 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • The Oregonian years ago had very good benefits under the 'old' system (in 5 reviews)

  • Work downtown, work with great people (in 3 reviews)

Cons
  • High turnover of staff, too many systems and procedures which ends up being in the way of actually getting things done (in 5 reviews)

  • Upper Management has no concern for the fact that so much talent has walked out of the door (in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Good things on the horizon"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Current Employee - Account Executive
    Current Employee - Account Executive
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    Pros

    Great job stability, ability to make money if in the right situation. The products and solutions offered really are great, and you have a lot of resources backing you. Also the job provides a lot of flexibility. New president is going to make changes, hopefully for the better.

    Cons

    Very unclear about commission structure up front, at times can be challenging to make money if you are in the wrong situation within the company. Sometimes goals are not as transparent as to how they get to that number, can make it tough for a rep to want to go out and sell knowing they won't be making money in certain months because of inflated goals.


  2. "Newsroom: Content strategy is outdated and innovation is stalled"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Portland, OR
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Portland, OR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at The Oregonian full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - Journalists are hardworking and dedicated
    - People work really well together. There is a great deal of mutual respect and support.
    - Colleagues are smart, creative and talented.

    Cons

    - Old school hierarchical approach to management is cumbersome an stifles innovation, which is critical to the industry's survival.
    - Work is assigned with little to no regard for an individual's skills, strengths or experience. Seasoned reporters crank out buzzfeed-style listicles.
    - Zero room for growth
    - High turnover

    Advice to Management

    If anything is going to kill online journalism, it will be old school print news executives clinging to a dying news model. The management structure must be flatter, more transparent and most importantly - collaborative.


  3. "Inside Sales"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Inside Sales Representative in Portland, OR
    Current Employee - Inside Sales Representative in Portland, OR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at The Oregonian full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The Oregonian has a great set of products and a huge online reach with oregonlive.com.
    They truly can offer wonderful solutions that make a real impact on businesses.

    Cons

    Once hired, they like to shift and change job positions and titles so be very flexible in what job your being hired for as positions change around here all the time and not always for the better. Some managers are great to work for and others are on a power trip and like to micromanage. I had a great manager as an outside rep for a long time and the inside sales manager is a nightmare to work for.

    Advice to Management

    Support your loyal employees and let them do their job without breathing down their necks.


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  5. Helpful (3)

    "Total Lack of Identity & Direction"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Portland, OR
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Portland, OR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Oregonian full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    If you want to a career in the digital marketing realm, OMG is a solid place to get your hands dirty. You have a lot of tools at your disposal to learn the products and techniques...though you have to be ambitious and take control of what you want to learn, as no one there really has the skill set to teach it correctly.

    Cons

    The place has a total lack of identity and understanding of who they are. While any business that is historically founded in that of print faces many obstacles as is, OMG does itself very little favors in helping itself going forward. 3 presidents in 2 years, with all 3 having very different aspects on the direction going forward has made the internal structure very fragile. The digital marketing side has turned more and more into a grinding sales environment (with poor leadership or idea of the direction to take on the market) which has made for a toxic working environment for many of its employees. High level leadership seems to be very clueless, and over 2 years it just seems that they are throwing things at the wall to see what sticks. While the company provides the ability to do a lot in terms of digital marketing, the internal set-up leaves a lot of errors in how that looks for the clients campaigns. Its very hard for me honestly recommend this place for either a potential employer or client, as it will leave a lot to be desired for both ends.

    Advice to Management

    Honestly...I can't even begin to think of what direction you would even start to revamp this. You have a new president, so hopefully that does something. But looking at the even larger picture with Advance I think you guys are already 10+ years behind.


  6. Helpful (1)

    "Should've Asked More Questions, Read the Reviews Here"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Portland, OR
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Portland, OR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Oregonian full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Decent salary.

    Good benefits.

    Great products.

    Reputable brand.

    Product/corporate training are great.

    Cons

    Note to current employees (and I guess prospective ones): they DON'T HONOR your two-week notice. I expected to be "marched out" because I was going to a competitor....I did not expect to be cut off completely the next day. Do the right thing? Doesn't matter. But this was indicative of my treatment there most of the time. It will be yours as well.

    Before I go on, I will let you know that my performance was not where it should have been. I own that. But never once did anyone ask what was up or offer more than token help.

    I enjoyed working for OMG as a company. I think things would have been much different working for any number of other people. Sales is about momentum and is a mental game; so if you never get momentum and have the wrong mindset, it’s more than likely not going to end up well.

    This is the first time I have ever performed poorly at anything significant. Ever. Allow me to explain where things went wrong:

    Interview process:

    1. I asked some questions and made statements that were fairly specific in scope. I had mentioned that at my previous employer, I had no agency relationships and shared the market with three other reps. I mentioned that I was looking forward to being the only person in the market.

      It was on my first morning, first email that I found out that there is indeed another rep in Eugene. Come to find out, he didn’t know about me until that email either.

      I was so clear on this issue that when they mentioned in a later interview that there are no accounts, no list, and I’d just be hunting, both me and the recruiter thought they were bluffing to gauge my interest. I told the recruiter that I wasn’t comfortable in a hunter-only role and that if this was the case I was going to turn the job down; I had a good job. Even though I led the NW region in number of new direct accounts closed at my previous employer, it’s not my strength and I know/knew it (I had an account list at previous place so wasn’t 100% hunting). Recruiter assured me that this wasn’t the case.

      Not only this, but all major agencies in town were already tied up with the other rep except for one minor one. I chalk these up not to deceit, but oversight. I do not suspect dishonesty on anyone’s part.

      Imagine sitting there your first day on the job, first hour, wondering if you just made a huge mistake. Yes, going to OMG was a mistake. I will take the lessons and things learned with me as a positive.

    Accounts:

    1. In the interview process, I was so sure of how wide open the market was, I was very confident that I would be able to go back and close my old accounts.

      My old accounts were listed in my resume, brought up in the interviews, and repeated in the “Welcome Email” from my new manager to the rest of the team. All of my old accounts from previous employers were either tied up with other reps, or OMG was in bad standing with them.

      With my largest accounts already off the table, and no opportunity for agency relationships, I was behind square one from day one.

    2. In August, my manager said I need to go back to the small businesses that I worked with while at previous employers. I mentioned that I was frustrated by this because I have been told on more than one occasion not to sell sites and don’t close accounts that are smaller than a certain amount.

      So I started following up with some with hit-or-miss results.

      When the SAME manager found out what I heard about the sites and the minimum amount the manager chastised me for taking the advice too literally…all while typing ferociously on the computer in the background.

      Then, when I told this same manager that I was not having the best of luck with my follow ups in the industries, the manager mocked my efforts saying, “Why did you go after them?” Same people. I was corrected both for not following up with my previous clients AND following up with my previous clients.

      Can you see why that might be frustrating?

      So I was sitting there trying to go after that dollar amount and above accounts, going for home runs all time and striking out quite often. After I explain my correction to my manager, the manager laughs at me and tells me about a relative who played Major League baseball. The whole time I wanted to interrupt and tell this manager, “Didn’t I just say that I fixed the problem?” But the manager persisted.

    Unsure footing:

    Along with the above small-business story, I received conflicting directions on a regular basis. Some of them were so striking that I couldn’t believe that the original stories weren’t remembered. Examples:

    1. On five different occasions, this manager asked “Why are you going after this client?” when it was on a list of clients I was told to go after.

    2. The aforementioned incident.

    3. Folders. Seems silly, but I asked early on if folders were left with clients as leave behinds. I was told, “Yes, all of the time”. A couple months later, I was told by the same person (the manager) that I should not do this because it leaves too much information when we don’t know what needs are.

    4. When a prospect called in, I followed up with an altered PPT slide that showed some of our capabilities. This was something that the corporate trainer told us to do in training. My manager got on my case for it and kept hitting on it. The manager mentioned it three times in a one-on-one then wondered why I was not answering. I’m sorry, but I don’t respond well to disrespect. This became a common theme in my time there.

    5. It seems small, but when we had the meeting with multiple prospects, I asked that manger over the phone what the attire should be for an AE. The manager told me that you can never be dressed too well for these things and that I should wear a suit and tie. I did. No one else did. I mentioned this and the manager didn’t remember saying it...TWO DAYS LATER.

    6. Another small instance: in our first discovery call, the manager and I mentioned bringing our spouses to a client in Eastern Oregon when we went over. When I emailed the manager about it a before the trip, the manager told me that it would not be appropriate then told me that we should ride together –an even more inappropriate request/suggestion. A flight somewhere is one thing, a five-hour car trip is another. If it was a cost-cutting suggestion, the manager didn't realize that one of us would have to drive four hours out of the way to make that happen.

    7. In training, it was said, “Always have a whiteboard”. In my first whiteboard –which was a disaster- I was told, “I’m not sure why you invited all of these people here”.

    8. Before a client's whiteboard, the manager said that we would just take a few minutes to ask questions and find their needs and concerns. I was fine with this, but taken aback when the manager jumped right into the capability slides. Immediately.

    9. We are told not to product pitch early. At a discovery meeting in southern Oregon, the manager was throwing out every product we have. I mentioned this on the way back to the airport and the manager said, “Sometimes, that’s what you do”. No budget or goals were asked for. The manager was plainly in charge of the discovery. So at the whiteboard, when I didn’t have these answers, I felt like the director of sales questioned my ability again.

    I have no complaints about the sales director, except when the director said early on, “If what you told us is true” regarding my track record on my resume. I was 100% truthful. If they doubted this, I’m not sure why they hired me. If they doubted, why didn't they call my previous employers? My references?

    Unresponsive:

    1. The lack of response to emails is astounding. It got so bad that I started sending summary emails every couple of days summing up the emails that I had sent that weren’t responded to. The manager even mentioned how much this was appreciated.

      While I was struggling to find good prospects, I was given a list of Top 100 prospects in the area by revenue. I was told that the list was untouched and not in SalesForce. This wasn't always the case, and I repeatedly asked for accounts to be moved to my name to the point where I got tired of asking.

    I will admit to tiring of these practices and stopped reaching out with regularity.

    2. Someone had a coaching session for the sales team (who is busy as well) on how to get more responses from other people in the building. A sales team shouldn’t have to sell to the people at their own company to get a response.

    3. When we were trying to close a local client for a website, the manager told me that I wasn’t asking for enough help from AV (tech) team, support, and management. I spent a couple of hours and found TEN different instances where I asked for help but got no response. Ten. Literally. No exaggeration.

    Training:

    1. I had been receiving some coaching from an old corporate friend lately. When I asked him what to do regarding all of this, he asked me about training. He asked me how many times I had been on sales calls with other reps, or how many times my manager had been on sales calls with me. He was floored when the answer was “Zero”. Granted, we had been into three discovery calls and two presentations together, but that had been it. Zero in nine months.

    He mentioned that even the greatest salespeople would have a hard time with a new company because of this.

    2. In my first few weeks of training, I was scheduled to go on a day of calls with a seasoned rep. Instead, I was shown the finer points of SalesForce (which I was already familiar with) and go over corporate email etiquette. We did have lunch and he told me how unhappy he was there and that he was looking for another job. Seems like a wasted day.

    3. Instead of "Well done" or "Good job"...after a sale you get "Now what?" "You didn't train on the next steps of this product" apparently isn't a good answer.

    4. The asking of the right questions kept coming up. I know how to talk to people. I know how to pry. I know how to uncover pain points. But most of the time when I bring up that I’m having a problem, the answer is, “You’re not asking the right questions” even though NO ONE had EVER gone on a sales call with me. I wish I could bold that last statement. Why did that reputation linger? In my opinion, it’s lazy to think that’s always the problem with reps. I think this reputation was applied in an early whiteboard meeting and I was never able to shake it. Hence the irony of my review title.

    Finally:

    My manager and I didn’t have a one-on-one for over a month in July-August. Yes, I should have brought something up but not being talked down to for an hour was appealing enough for me to keep my mouth shut.

    We spoke for over an hour on my second-to-last Friday where I told the manager that I felt unsupported and was lacking confidence in the job. I have never lacked confidence in anything but after reading what I’ve written here I understand why I do. Instead of asking how this can be fixed, I was served a performance plan.

    In a final show of disrespect, the manager didn't talk to me about the performance plan, but asked me if I was near a computer because the manager had something to send over for me to read. The manager left three lines blank at the bottom for my comments but all of this review wouldn't fit. :) The next day, instead of mentioning it by what it was, the manager emailed, "I need the paperwork I sent over returned by COB today". Needless to say, I didn't sign it but finally was able to turn in my two-week notice the next Monday (and be cut off the next day).

    The nicest the manager ever was to me was after I submitted my resignation. But come to find out, it was only to fish out of me where I was going so that I could be cut off the next day.

    I'm not sure how some people sleep at night.

    Advice to Management

    Realize meritocracies don't work. Just because you're good at a job does not mean you'll be good at managing people doing the same job.

    Maybe more corporate training for managers. "How to treat people". Maybe? A lot of good people left during my short tenure there, and many others unhappy and looking.


  7. Helpful (4)

    "The. Worst."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Portland, OR
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Portland, OR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Oregonian full-time

    Pros

    The Oregonian used to be a great place to work. They used to care about employees and their families, have great benefits package, and very competitive pay. They also used to guarantee gull rime employees would not be laid off. Until the decided they didn't care anymore. The Oregonian cut pay and benefits year after year and laid hundreds of people off. They did it in the most demoralizing way and with no regard for long time employees or company loyal folks.

    Cons

    Management is terrible, dishonest, and welcome feedback then ignore or threaten employees who say anything they don't want to hear. Look up the story on the demise of print journalism and the dangers of that on Jon Oliver's Daily Show. They actually use the O as an example.

    Advice to Management

    Quit. Go work somewhere that aligns with your skillset...lIke an authoritarian dictatorship or a sweat shop.


  8. Helpful (1)

    "Advice: Use them to learn about digital, then go find a better job"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Portland, OR
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Portland, OR
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at The Oregonian full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    1. You get a pretty broad knowledge of a lot of digital products. SEO, SEM, Digital Display, Social Media, Content Marketing...
    2. A lot of the people that work there (other than upper management) are cool but everyone is leaving or looking to leave so don't bank on your friends staying around long.
    3. Downtown Portland
    4. You can make your own schedule (why people sometimes stay)

    Cons

    I don't even know where to start:
    `1. Upper Management has no concern for the fact that so much talent has walked out of the door.
    2. Moral is incredibly low and management could care less
    3. They sell a lot of products..but not well
    4. High turnover because the culture is terrible, pay is not that great and management isn't there to help you.
    5. The upper management is so concerned on the little things (like salesforce tasks) instead of getting out of their chairs and helping their team in the field.
    6. Honestly, it was the worst job I have ever had...PERIOD!

    My advice is if you want to learn digital marketing and the world of media, go there, use them for their training and then go find a better job. I have moved on and now I know how a good company treats their employees. I would recommend staying for 1 1/2 - 2 Years and then getting out of there. I will say that having the Oregonian on your resume isn't that impressive to potential employers because everyone in the state, knows what a mess the organization is but the base knowledge you will gain there will help you in the long run.

    Advice to Management

    The Oregonian doesn't even read their glass door reviews (which is sad) so advice doesn't matter.


  9. Helpful (2)

    "Advertising Department of OMG"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    1. Advance works really hard to keep everyone trained so you learn a lot

    Cons

    1. There is very high turnover and morale is consistently low
    2. Some of the sales reps, managers, and directors are not up to speed on their digital knowledge making it very difficult to find a resource who can, and are willing, to help
    3. Gannett Imaging and Design Center, who handles the display creative, doesn't have the most skilled artists
    4. Because Advance handles a lot of the actual work (e.g. SEO, social media) there isn't much opportunity to practice what you are learning in the trainings
    5. There are a lot of people who have been there for many, many, many years and changes occur frequently so those who knew the company way back when are not always positive about the direction the newer business is going. Very disheartening for employees who want to move forward
    6. Layoffs occur somewhat frequently, mostly in the newsroom
    7. Upper management/directors, etc. don't listen to concerns. I think 10 employees left at one point due to poor/bad management and this was chosen to be ignored
    8. Problems never get solved and frustration runs rampant, hence the high turnover

    Advice to Management

    Listen to your employees. When you're in meetings all day long you are disconnected. Problems are happening on the floor and in outside sales, and because digital knowledge is somewhat non-existent you are not strengthening the company and helping your employees grow.


  10. "Changing fast, but so is the industry"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Oregonian full-time

    Pros

    Still the best place to do journalism in Portland
    Co-workers are incredible
    Only place to really cover city and state government well

    Cons

    Advance is moving away from print, alienating longtime readers
    Web traffic is still an unproven business model
    Journalism industry is not in good shape
    Outlook for industry as a whole is poor

    Advice to Management

    I know you can't say anything to Advance, but tell them to lay off


  11. "Cultural center"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Oregonian full-time

    Pros

    Find out concert schedules, work with big local brands. Work downtown, work with great people.

    Cons

    Owned by major corporation, little room to grow. Not a great deal of creativity.

    Advice to Management

    It was a great experience, I really enjoyed all my managers.



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