The Telegraph Reviews in London, England | Glassdoor

The Telegraph London Reviews

Updated November 29, 2017
50 reviews

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London, England (UK)

3.5
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The Telegraph CEO Nick Hugh
Nick Hugh
3 Ratings

50 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Competitive salaries and good benefits (in 8 reviews)

  • Great benefits - massages, gym on site, discounted canteen and bar and offices just had a revamp so are quite hi-tech (in 4 reviews)

Cons
  • Apparent lack of clear vision from senior management (in 10 reviews)

  • No development opportunities, no clear direction from management, bit of a boys club mentality (in 5 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "My review"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Junior Creative in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Junior Creative in London, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at The Telegraph full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    A great video department that's well-staffed with talented people. Also possesses a lot of kit in-house. Content is of a high calibre.

    Cons

    Lacks career development and training opportunities for employees. Also lacks a great social scene.

    Advice to Management

    To have a more open two-way conversation with staff. Trust them for their knowledge and consider their opinions. Also senior staff need to reward staff who have consistently shone in the workplace.


  2. "An apprentice at the Telegraph!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Apprentice in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Apprentice in London, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at The Telegraph full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    With the launching of the new company values, people have a better understanding of the companies goals and values.
    As an apprentice I get given the opportunity to work in a department and complete various tasks that benefit a range of teams.
    I've been given various opportunities to aid my development .
    My manager and I have regular 1-to1's and advises me on ways in which I can develop and improve skills that I already have.

    Cons

    With the current restructure there isn't much space to have meetings.

    Advice to Management

    The members of the executive team should be more approachable, so that people feel like they can talk to them.

  3. "Shifting culture with fresh positivity"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at The Telegraph full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    A strong brand with a fantastic buzz of excitement you'd find at small start-ups. I've been here for less than a year but have seen such positive change in this time following the appointment of brand new leadership and the evolving approaches to staff engagement.

    Colleagues and collaborators in other departments are great, there’s a high level of skill in the teams generally and plenty of experienced people to learn from, with a fast pace that keeps you on your toes.

    Employee benefits are great (free gym, massage, fruit, all v healthy!) some nice new perks added more recently, very convenient location, and an encouragement for smart working.

    Cons

    Not everyone is open to the change that we’ve seen, especially those with a number of years within the business, so I think there have been some resignations as a result.

    And like any organisation you work at you will see a bit of office politics, but the vast majority of people I have worked with here have been supportive, straightforward and helpful.

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the good work with regards to positive changes, improved benefits and perks, and specifically the improved updates and visibility of company strategy to employees.


  4. "Depressing and boozy"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales Associate in London, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Sales Associate in London, England (UK)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Telegraph full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Free gym and on site GP!

    Cons

    The print industry is suffering because their readers are literally dying. It's a challenge working for a second rate product that is not as effective as it once was. The open plan sales office emulates a dated 80's hive with very little natural light. At it's epicenter are the 'Execs'; A tatty, noisy, juvenile bunch we had to work around. Most of them look like they've seen better days and are beyond uninspiring. A lot of boozy lunches, casual sexism and unattractive, depressed staff. Couldn't believe how happy I was after I left.

    Advice to Management

    Move on! Establish an exciting company culture that reflects the way we live and work today. Your current strategy is as outdated as your boring product.


  5. "Enjoying it"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at The Telegraph full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    - Good technologies
    - Management listens to suggestions
    - Not too bureaucratic
    - Friendly
    - Not stressful
    - Great life/ work balance
    - Flexible
    - Gym
    - Massages and GP
    - Good benefits
    - Competitive salary
    - Great people around

    Cons

    - Can be lacking directions at times, with no strong roadmap


  6. "Quiet"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Journalist in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Journalist in London, England (UK)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at The Telegraph full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Lots of clever people doing good journalism

    Cons

    Most people in editorial are introvert so there's not much banter and hardly anything happens outside of working hours

    Advice to Management

    Arrange social events for staff


  7. "A good stepping stone"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at The Telegraph full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    The Telegraph as a name on your CV is very good, it'll get you noticed in the future. The Performance/Customer team is going by leaps and bounds in terms of digital presence and strategy, so it's a good place to be. The company benefits are good (private health insurance, small internal gym, ticket loan, good maternity package etc). The offices have been recently modernised and are nice and airy.

    Cons

    Too high a turnover which means you don't have the same feeling of belonging that used to be there years ago. You don't feel valued as an employee, it takes several years before they promote anyone to a higher role and even then don't expect a payrise! You don't really get guided in your own development but are more expected to develop your role-core skills and constantly bring something new to the role even if you're not qualified for that. No Christmas parties or anything like that! You are expected to take on lots of extra work with no recognition. The salaries are really rather low for the industry, much lower than DMG Media, for example. Politically, the newspaper is moving towards the UKIP direction as one of the Barclays brothers is a supporter, so watch out there.

    Advice to Management

    Value your employees more! Give out a bit more payrises. Giving out a couple of grand to hard working, loyal employees who have been there a few years will keep them motivated and it's not going to make a difference to your finances. Especially considering how much is spent on those ever-frequent golf and away days for the exec team when they need to make decisions. Do Christmas parties, summer parties, more initiatives to make them feel like they are appreciated and that they belong. No wonder you have such a high turnover. There used to be spontaneous drinks every Friday. Now no one really cares any more so that's declining considerably.

  8. Helpful (1)

    "Can be interesting, can be frustrating for technologists"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in London, England (UK)
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at The Telegraph full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    There's a relatively high turn over and a propensity for short term solutions. That's not really a pro but it means its a bit chaotic and within that context you often have room to explore new technologies and ways of doing things. Its a bit of an art working in that environment and if you're the wrong personality type it'll just frustrate you. But if you learn how to work it, you can find opportunities to try new things. As someone that's worked in both start ups and large companies the thing that limits you in large companies is the established order, it can be a lot harder to break out of the very rigid definition of what your department does. The Telegraph is not a startup like environment but the slight sense of chaos does mean you can find ways to work with new tech and they have fully embraced the cloud and cloud services which also makes that easier. So if you can figure out how to use it, you could get some good exposure with the relative security of an established company (the turn over isn't because technologists jobs are insecure, its because they leave)

    Cons

    They still have quite an old school attitude that a lot of businesses that aren't native digital or technology organisations have. The attitude is that "the business", i.e. commercial or editorial people, set the requirements, filtered through product managers that also generally don't have a great understanding of tech, and then the technical team is just a delivery factory. They just don't acknowledge how much of the innovation that is disrupting their business is driven by technologists in silicon valley and the importance of making innovation a two way conversation of equals. That also means they buy into the philosophy "buy rather than build" a little too naively, they're much more likely to be taken in by an exec level presentation that glosses over important details than to heed any concerns or champion any ideas their technologists might have. As a technologist you can get around this by taking advantage of the chaos and just getting on and building stuff instead of selling the vision to people who may not understand it. But then you have to be willing to take your own satisfaction for any of your successes, even if you do build something that actually helps the business in some way, there's a reasonable chance they won't actually understand what you've given them. I think they started to dismantle things I did when I left, but I still got what I wanted out of it.

    Advice to Management

    Your traditional audience is gradually dying and the long term growth will come from mastering digital. You will probably survive if that's the ambition but you're not going to excel against competitors and new digital platforms that master the technologies and data science unless you also start really competing in those areas. To do that you are going to have to embrace technologists and data scientists a little more enthusiastically. Your editorial and commercial teams are still and should be valuable voices, but you have the balance wrong, at the moment it’s a bit of a master & servant relationship and it needs to be a meeting of equals.


  9. "Good place to work as a freelancer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer in London, England (UK)
    Former Freelancer - Anonymous Freelancer in London, England (UK)

    I worked at The Telegraph (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    - Central location
    - Great people working hard at their jobs
    - Freelancers treated as part of the team

    Cons

    - IT dept. is slow to respond in case there are problems.


  10. Helpful (1)

    "Account Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales Account Manager in London, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Sales Account Manager in London, England (UK)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at The Telegraph (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great place to work really enjoyed it

    Cons

    Can have late nights not great if you have a family

    Advice to Management

    promote more people in house rather than bringing in external people its not good for moral and.


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