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The Washington Post

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The Washington Post

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The Washington Post Employee Reviews about "journalism"

Updated Jan 17, 2021

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Found 24 of over 458 reviews

4.4
91%
Recommend to a Friend
96%
Approve of CEO
The Washington Post CEO and Publisher Frederick J. Ryan Jr.
Frederick J. Ryan Jr.
197 Ratings
Pros
  • "Work-life-balance is extremely good(in 29 reviews)

  • "The Post is one of the world's best organizations to do impactful journalism(in 24 reviews)

  • Cons
  • "Newsroom diversity still an issue(in 18 reviews)

  • "Diversity is still an issue in the newsroom, as well as in upper management(in 13 reviews)

  • More Pros and Cons
    Pros & Cons are excerpts from user reviews. They are not authored by Glassdoor.

    Ratings by Demographics

    This rating reflects the overall rating of The Washington Post and is not affected by filters.

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    Reviews about "journalism"

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    1. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 1 year

      I love working for The Post

      Nov 11, 2020 - Assignment Editor in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      The Post values collaboration, rewards hard work, is innovative and focused on growth and success throughout the organization. It's a culture mostly free of newsroom politics and full of genuinely nice & thoughtful people. I have the resources I need to create impactful journalism and feel really fortunate to work for The Post at a time when many U.S. newsrooms are suffering,

      Cons

      The Post is working to improve its record promoting people of color but there's room for improvement, especially in the upper ranks. The Post has improved in this area of late but should keep pressing.

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      1 person found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for your thoughtful review about working at The Post. We are glad that you are experiencing our rewarding and innovative culture. At The Post, we continue to build initiatives focused on diversity, inclusion and equity based on demographic data and feedback like yours. If you have any other feedback or recommendations, please email us at life@washpost.com

    2. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 5 years

      Great company that supports professional growth

      Sep 23, 2020 - Product Director in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      The Post is filled with smart, passionate, generous people motivated by the mission. My coworkers are the number one reason I love working here. They inspire and challenge me every day. I am especially grateful for them during this uncertain time. My teammates and direct management are a source of support and encouragement, now more than ever. The company is also large enough that you can constantly take on a new challenge by expanding your scope of responsibilities in your current org or changing things up and jumping over to a different part of the company. In many ways there are multiple companies within the walls of The Post: journalism, technology, subscriptions and advertising, and even a growing SaaS company (Arc Publishing, Zeus Technology).

      Cons

      On the flip side, due to the size and many focus areas, organizational silos exist that can slow decision-making and meaningful progress. If you thrive in a smaller, more nimble team environment, you're likely to become frustrated with what feels like unnecessary workplace politics. The Post values action-oriented leaders and that can often translate into well-meaning people pulling in different directions at full speed. This is not unique to The Post and a difficult problem to solve no matter where you work, but exhausting nonetheless.

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      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for taking the time to write a thoughtful review. We're glad that The Post culture and your coworkers have been a source of strength during these uncertain times and that you have opportunities to learn/grow. We also appreciate you sharing your view on getting tasks accomplished while maneuvering the larger organization. If you would be willing, feel free to email us (confidentially) any other ideas that you have regarding this to life@washpost.com.

    3. 4.0
      Current Employee

      Overall a satisfying place to work

      Jan 17, 2021 - Senior Software Engineer in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      There are many positives: I work on new, interesting technology; I have a highly competent manager from whom I've learned a great deal; I get to contribute to a platform that supports journalism globally; etc.

      Cons

      The pay is not as high as what I could earn in other sectors: I work a lot of hours but am making an average salary for what someone with my job makes in my city. Also, there are no bonuses or profit sharing measures tied to performance.

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      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      I get to contribute to a platform that supports journalism globally." Well said and it's so true. No matter where you sit within the company, we're all inspired by our mission. Thanks for being part of The Washington Post!

    4. 4.0
      Current Intern, less than 1 year

      Great teamwork, but low diversity and institutional knowledge/transparency

      Dec 19, 2020 - Intern in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Company mission and modesty: From what I've seen, Post employees believe in the public service of journalism and are willing to acknowledge their own failings and room for growth, especially as it relates to diversity and equity. Talk is cheap, of course, but I am encouraged by the direction of The Post, and I am happy to say that I contribute to its work toward a more informed and equitable world. Space for employees' exploration and ideas: As an intern on the engineering team, I have so greatly appreciated the willingness of my boss and others to not only hear me out on my ideas and interests, but also encourage me to explore them and keep conversations going, despite my status as an intern. In past internships, I've felt like an intern, whereas with The Post I've felt like a true member of the team, with the flexibility to try new things and even lead specific efforts. Others on the team have been so gracious with their time, and I've never felt lost because I can always count on a response from someone, even remotely. This has helped me feel more confident and has opened the door to many opportunities for which I am extremely grateful. Organization of engineering workflow/communication: While I have concerns about institutional knowledge (see Cons), I feel that we do a good job following Agile development practices. We use Jira for organizing sprint work, we hold daily standup meetings over Zoom and we use Slack for lots of other daily team (and company-wide) communication. Support always feels available, and the environment feels laid-back and fun (lots of puns, gifs and emojis, in particular), even though we are working hard. Team members frequently drop everything to review a pull request for someone, help someone with debugging or just answer questions, and that is a testament to the focus placed on teamwork.

      Cons

      Low racial diversity: While I have been encouraged by the relatively high amount of female leadership and overall female presence on The Post's engineering teams, the lack of racial diversity among engineers (and in the newsroom/company in general) is inexcusable, hurts the company and hurts the people we serve. The Post needs to hire and promote more people of color, especially Black people, who are severely underrepresented. It's frustrating that percentage breakdowns of The Post's engineering team by race and gender were not shared with employees this year, despite newsroom percentages being shared at town halls. Lack of transparency surrounding salary and hiring/promotion practices: In addition to my concerns about the lack of transparency surrounding The Post's diversity efforts, I have concerns about the lack of transparency in hiring more generally. When I was initially approached about being hired full-time, I was informed of a range of salaries that people filling the same position are typically offered. I was then offered a salary below that range entirely, and I was given no clear explanation. After expressing my discomfort and confusion, I was offered a salary at exactly the bottom of the range, and the offer was not increased from there. It was not until after raising concerns multiple times that I was given context for the offer that helped clear things up a bit. In contrast, a friend interning with Facebook was able to describe to me in detail the processes and considerations for pay and promotion because the environment at Facebook had been much more transparent. Unsurprisingly, this friend seemed much more comfortable and confident about the process through which they were hired. Appraisals are more frequent at Facebook as well (twice per year vs. once per year at The Post). The Post should facilitate a more open discussion, through services like Glassdoor, online forums, etc., regarding how it makes decisions on starting salaries, raises and promotions. I was definitely put off by my experience, and I imagine greater transparency will directly benefit The Post by helping it hire more confident and comfortable employees. Overly decentralized sharing of information and resources: The Post's engineering team is full of passionate, kind and hardworking people, but the company shouldn't rely on them as individuals to share important resources and information to fellow employees, especially new hires who may be overwhelmed or lost. Some sort of guide or wiki for new engineers could go a long way, in addition to separate institutional knowledge bases within sub-teams and even for projects like the one I worked on this summer. There are definitely times that my work is hindered due to a lack of institutional knowledge and (a separate but related issue) communication between the newsroom and engineering. Some project requirements have not been known until relatively late in the process, for instance. The issue of institutional knowledge and resources applies to community-building as well. I can't speak for marginalized and underrepresented groups, but I haven't seen any company-wide mention of Slack channels or other groups where people with similar backgrounds or experiences can meet each other. Considering the size of The Post, it seems like organizing and publicizing these types of resources would be very valuable.

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    5. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 3 years

      Great work-life balance at a mission-oriented organization

      Sep 25, 2020 - Anonymous Employee 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      - work with smart, friendly people across multiple disciplines - great work-life balance - ability to innovate and experiment constantly within your project scope - management is amenable to new ideas and thinking - work on the business side goes directly to support important work in journalism

      Cons

      - company priorities are not widely distilled across the organization so expect some level of iterative chaos - not a place for clear, linear career progression and promotion - there are elements of legacy corporate mindset lurking across the org - slow (perhaps deliberate) decision making at the top

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      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      We're glad to hear that your role is made great by coworkers, ownership of ideas/projects and the mission-driven nature of The Post. We’d like to hear more about your thoughts on company priorities, career progression, corporate mindset and slow decision making. If you would be willing, feel free to confidentially email us more details to life@washpost.com.

    6. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 1 year

      Great organization with opportunities to excel

      Sep 14, 2020 - Graphics Reporter in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      The Post is one of the world's best organizations to do impactful journalism. It has a huge audience, and it employs some of the best editors and reporters in the world. If you want to do good work that makes a difference, you should try to get a job here.

      Cons

      Because the audience is so huge and the public scrutiny so intense, there's a lot of pressure to do good work. That kind of environment is not for everyone.

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      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for taking the time to write a response. We love hearing about the difference you are making with your work as a Graphics Reporter. Thank you for choosing to be a part of The Washington Post team!

    7. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 3 years

      Incredible culture and support

      Sep 23, 2020 - Sales in Rockville, MD
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      - Start up mentality, willing to take risks, innovate, and not just in tech - Collaborative culture across sales and marketing - The feeling knowing you're supporting some of the world's best journalism is unmatched - Supportive management, flexible and enabling employees to do their best work - Beautiful building in the heart of downtown!

      Cons

      As others have mentioned, the healthcare leaves much to be desired

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      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      You're right! For being a legacy company of over 142 years, we feel more like a start-up. Innovation happens throughout the company. Some employees comment that it's nice to work for a start-up with the brand name and resources of a larger company.

    8. 4.0
      Current Employee, more than 1 year

      Great work, but hard work

      Sep 23, 2020 - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      - You're constantly pushed to produce the best work - Everything you do is rewarding - With the landscape of journalism always changing, there's always space to grow - Work with some of the smartest, most creative people in the world

      Cons

      - Rather difficult to move up in ranks unless a) you're a white man or b) you know someone higher up - lack of diversity within management - no set streamline to groom the forthcoming generation(s) of journalists beside internship program - long hours (to be expected) - advocating for higher pay is a *long* process and may not result in anything

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      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      We’re glad to read that you can do your best work at The Post, feel rewarded, have growth opportunities and collaborate well with coworkers. We would also like to hear more about your ideas regarding career growth, lack of diversity, long hours, ways to streamline building up younger generations and compensation. Feel free to email us (confidentially) to life@washpost.com.

    9. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 1 year

      I love working for the Post

      Aug 4, 2020 - Graphics Editor in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      I feel that the Post does top notch journalism across the board, while maintaining a friendly environment.

      Cons

      Like any other newsroom, sometimes you have to work with limited resources. But, in general, you have all you need to get the job done.

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      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for taking time to write a review. We love hearing that you feel our culture is one of top notch journalism with a friendly environment. We also appreciate your feedback on resources, expansion of visual/multimedia journalism and investing in diversity/pay.

    10. 5.0
      Current Employee, more than 1 year

      Opportunities Galore

      Mar 13, 2020 - Anonymous Employee 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      I work with the Arc Publishing team within The Washington Post and I am constantly amazed at the wide range of opportunities available in this organization. Journalism (obviously!), software engineering, digital product development, legal services, human resources and talent development, sales and account management, PR, social media, and more. Regardless of your background and skill set, if you're passionate about supporting the highest standards in journalism (and helping other organizations do the same), I highly recommend you consider a position at The Washington Post. I've felt valued, supported, encouraged, and fairly compensated in my role, and I'm looking forward to further developing my career here.

      Cons

      Some of the teams feel "siloed" at times and communication may suffer because of this. Leadership is predominantly white and male. I would love to have a few more diverse voices at the table.

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      The Washington Post Response

      Talent Attraction & Development Specialist

      Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a review - we appreciate it when employees (past and present) take the time to leave us feedback. We are so glad that you feel valued and supported at The Post! We emphasize working across silos and we're sorry to hear that that hasn't been your experience. Please feel free to confidentially email us at life@washpost.com with more information - we'd love to see how we can help with the communication issue you described.

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