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The Washington Post

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The Washington Post

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The Washington Post Employee Reviews about "upper management"

Updated Nov 10, 2020

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Found 13 of over 457 reviews

4.4
91%
Recommend to a Friend
96%
Approve of CEO
The Washington Post CEO and Publisher Frederick J. Ryan Jr.
Frederick J. Ryan Jr.
197 Ratings
Pros
  • "Work-life-balance is extremely good(in 29 reviews)

  • "The Post is one of the world's best organizations to do impactful journalism(in 24 reviews)

  • Cons
  • "Newsroom diversity still an issue(in 18 reviews)

  • "Diversity is still an issue in the newsroom, as well as in upper management(in 13 reviews)

  • More Pros and Cons
    Pros & Cons are excerpts from user reviews. They are not authored by Glassdoor.

    Ratings by Demographics

    This rating reflects the overall rating of The Washington Post and is not affected by filters.

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    Reviews about "upper management"

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    1. 4.0
      Current Employee, more than 1 year

      Exciting time to work at The Post

      Nov 10, 2020 - Producer in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Lots of cross-newsroom opportunities, the overall ethos of the organization is collaboration so it offers lots of room for growth especially for up and coming young journalists.

      Cons

      Diversity is still an issue in the newsroom, as well as in upper management. As with any other organization in this industry it is a bit more difficult to exist within it as a journalist of color so having a robust support system inside and outside work is key.

      Continue reading
      1 person found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for taking the time to write a review on your experience working at The Post. We enjoy hearing about your experiences with innovation and professional growth. We also appreciate your thoughts on diversity, inclusion and equity. This is an important issue that we continue to build upon, and feedback like yours in very helpful. If you have any more thoughts on how we can improve, feel free to confidentially email us at life@washpost.com.

    2. 4.0
      Current Employee, more than 3 years

      My Experience at WaPo

      Sep 29, 2020 - Yield Manager in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Benefits, Coworkers, Communication, and Work/Life Balance

      Cons

      Upward Growth, Diversity in Upper Management

      1 person found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thanks for taking the time to write a review. We’re glad to hear that you’ve had a positive experience overall. We would, however, like to understand your feedback concerning upward growth and diversity in upper management. While we have been working diligently to expand our diversity initiatives, we realize there is still more work to do. If you feel comfortable, we would like to get more of your thoughts on how we can improve in these areas. Feel free to confidentially e-mail us at life@washpost.com.

    3. 1.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      Not for PoC or Women

      Apr 3, 2019 - Developer in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Looks good on your resume

      Cons

      This place has an issue retaining people of color and women that they acknowledge but don’t do anything about. Specifically in engineering the senior management and C Suite have created an environment where if you vocalize issues with process (there are tons) you are outcast and pushed out of the company. It is very much an old boys club and unless you’re a white man there is no chance of you rising to any management or upper management position. Of all the teams there, there are maybe 3 good teams with good managers. The rest have terrible managers, there’s no sense of community, leadership or mentorship. There’s no good system to move teams because your ability to move teams is based on your managers review, and if your manager is not good then your chances of going to an internal team are low. This also limits your chance for the very frugal annual raise as well. HR doesn’t properly handle these situations, they have aided in managing out of several PoC and women employees. Since management opportunities only exist for a select few there is a very competitive toxic work environment. Don’t reccomend for anyone jr - mid level. I think this place is only barely doable if you’re super senior and can handle the terrible work environment and have the know how to untangle the mess that is the majority of the code bases. The only culture here is “if you’re silent about your pain they will kill you and say you enjoyed it”.

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      11 people found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thanks for sharing your experience working at The Washington Post. We take feedback seriously as we work toward being a great place to work for all. We need people from all backgrounds to join The Washington Post to innovate media and technology. We will look into your feedback and would appreciate any additional information you can provide. Feel free to confidentially e-mail us at life@washpost.com.

    4. 1.0
      Current Employee, more than 5 years

      Ivory Tower Atmosphere of Misery

      Jul 21, 2016 - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Readership is growing, and Bezos has inspired drive for innovation. New headquarters building in DC is clean and nice.

      Cons

      Upper management is cleaning house, mostly female managers disappearing. Very little interaction between CRO and sales, same method he did with Time - get rid of majority of existing middle management, leaving the scared few as henchmen to start cleaning out salesforce. They are not above manipulating the numbers to 'entice' employees to leave, yet offering packages to walk out the door. CRO fails to interact with the majority, and demands hires of those he knows or specifies the company he wants them to come from. Atmosphere of fear, distrust and misery. I would not recommend working for this heartless company, as they treat sales terrible, especially women over the age of 40. Thankless job for management, as most disappear unless they become yes-men regardless of impact on others or their own dignity. Compensation is lacking, and they are not above making changes without telling you.

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      6 people found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thanks for your feedback. Although it's hard to hear negative feedback, we do value it and we're sorry you had a negative experience. We’d love to hear more specifics. Feel free to e-mail us : life@washpost.com. We want to make sure your voice is heard!

    5. 1.0
      Current Employee

      Thinking of working at The Washington Post in advertising?

      Feb 21, 2010 - Account Manager in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Large company. Competitive base salary, decent benefits. Office location in the middle of NW DC. Instant name recognition with the local area and nationwide.

      Cons

      No one makes any money outside of their base salary, outrageous quotas, unrealistic activity metrics, upper management oblivious to competitions prices and puts no money into new products or improvements. No prospecting allowed (yes, even for a sales position) instead you are provided a list of existing clients that you are to treat as prospects. Upper management lacks any kind of actually selling experience but relies on an outside sales trainer that has no idea of what the actual conditions are for the account managers. In turn, wasting hundreds of thousands of dollars on training with no return on investment.

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      9 people found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for your review and feedback. We have a commitment toward growth and making The Washington Post a great place to work for all. We’d love to hear more specifics if you are finding these issues still today. Feel free to e-mail us: life@washpost.com. Thank you!

    6. 3.0
      Former Employee

      My experience before the .com moved downtown with the paper was great, full of opportunities.

      Apr 14, 2012 -  in Arlington, VA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      The best part of working for the Post was at wpni before it folded with the paper. WPNI was a great place to work and offered a lot of opportunities. At WPNI you felt like you made a difference and had a say.

      Cons

      The biggest con working at the post was upper management. The communications and leadership was extremely poor. Once Don Graham stepped down things have seemed to go down hill.

      Continue reading
      1 person found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for the review and feedback. We have a commitment toward growth and making The Washington Post a great place to work for all. Thanks for your feedback about management. This year, we started The Leadership Project, a series of ongoing development opportunities for all leaders across The Post. We’d love to hear more specifics about your feedback. Feel free to e-mail us: life@washpost.com. Thank you for allowing The Washington Post to be part of your career journey!

    7. 2.0
      Former Employee, more than 5 years

      The dazzling place to work is not so much dazzling inside.

      Jan 18, 2013 - Lead Developer in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      -Competitive salaries. -Excellent benefits,one of the best Health Insurance plans. -Brand Name(at least in Wash,DC Metro Area) -- once you have this name on your resume be assured no one will look down on you,be it for contracting or full time opportunities.

      Cons

      **I work in IT and I have seen Newsroom very very closely.I have informed opinion about both** Lets be honest,newspaper industry is going through a tough phase.Now if you are in Newspaper industry you have to absorb the shocks which are coming from upper management,knee jerk reactions,and witness lot of bloodbath in terms of employees getting laid etc.Bottom line, you are at the mercy of new CIO,your manager,and the budget.Performance doesn't matter. When the time was good(till 2010ish),IT was treated as a step child and people(publishers etc.) were happy making money from Print.The decline was there but not that alarming.Now when a notable decline came in 2010ish everyone panicked. McKinsey etc. were called and they suggested hey,you know what this is digital age...duh..The wake up call turned into hiring of new CIO and his nickel and dimming.Coffee machines were removed and replaced with vending machines.Employees were laid off by calling them "inefficiencies".No lunches,no Happy hours.Compensation took a severe hit,and growth opportunities were never there.Oh and there is no place for training and company paying for learning new tech.So,now IT is like a code generating machine,which WPO wants to use it 24*7 for making money and it's survival.Post being a gandalf has old employees who worked on Unix all their lives.I call them worthless boulders bcz they just dont want to leave or learn.Journalists work all their lives in print and doing typesetting etc., so for them digital CMS system is a blackbox.They dont want to learn it and keep making mistakes bcz of not getting proper training.FF today,Post is making a desperate attempt to expand it's digital platform(results can be seen by the products launched in 2012) and investing in Mobile technologies.To call situation at Post pressure cooker is an understatement.Work-Life balance is missing since at least past 1.5 years.No one job is secure.All in all,if you want to join this company expect nothing but your paycheck.No you can't have weekends.Period. Tell yourself that you are here just to have that brand name on your resume so that you can find a better life elsewhere with normal work schedules and not feel treated like garbage.

      Continue reading
      3 people found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for the review and feedback. We're so sorry you had a negative experience working for us. We have a commitment toward growth and making The Washington Post a great place to work for all . We’d love to hear more specifics. Feel free to e-mail us: life@washpost.com.

    8. 4.0
      Current Employee, more than 10 years

      The Washington Post is a vibrant organization open to change.

      Feb 23, 2014 - Assignment Editor in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Senior management is open to new ideas and willing to allow employees to experiment and try new ideas. The prestige and history of the Post is hard to replace.

      Cons

      I wish there was more diversity in upper management and those identified as "star" reporters, but the organization is aware of those issues and is attempting to address is.

      Continue reading
      Be the first to find this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for taking time to write a review. We love hearing about our employees’ positive experiences. We've passed on your feedback to our team. Thank you for choosing to be part of The Washington Post team!

    9. 2.0
      Current Employee, more than 3 years

      Outdated technology and day-to-day processes

      Aug 1, 2013 - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Salary, location, metro-accessible, health benefits and compensation package, overtime, amount of vacation and sick days available and the largest and most-recognized print news source in the Washington, DC area

      Cons

      Upper management and managers are clueless when making decisions, old technology, sales goals are not realistic, trying to hold on to a dying print-based industry, no tuition reimbursement and boring

      Continue reading
      2 people found this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for your review and feedback. Leadership/management is something we're focusing on with the launch this year of The Leadership Project, a series of ongoing development opportunities for all leaders across The Post. Thank you again for your feedback. We have a commitment toward growth and making The Washington Post a great place to work for all. We’d love to hear more specifics. Feel free to e-mail us: life@washpost.com.

    10. 3.0
      Former Employee, more than 10 years

      Company is in transition.

      Jan 22, 2014 - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Great people, great benefits. Company has a great work-life balance, family friendly-understands when you have to deal with health or family issues.

      Cons

      Company is downsizing and in transition. Not very likely to get a raise or bonus unless you are a sales rep or upper management and some departments are short staffed.

      Be the first to find this review helpful

      The Washington Post Response

      The Washington Post Team

      Thank you for the review and feedback. We continue to grow as a company in web traffic, new hires, and the technology the company creates. We have a commitment toward growth and making The Washington Post a great place to work for all. We’d love to hear more specifics. Feel free to e-mail us: life@washpost.com.

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