Trivantis Reviews | Glassdoor

Trivantis Reviews

Updated April 20, 2017
17 reviews

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3.0
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Lori Lynne Todd
7 Ratings

17 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Great place to work, fun crowd."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Trivantis full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Office environment and a great team, we work hard but still have a lot of fun

    Cons

    The salary is lagging behind the rest of the industry


  2. Helpful (1)

    "For some reason the past CEO believed she must destroy the company to sell it"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Trivantis full-time

    Pros

    Very loyal employee base who have a real commitment to seeing Trivantis survive.

    Cons

    Hasn't had focus for years. There has been no greater example of robbing the top line to bolster the bottom line short term. A classic formula for failure and it was and all suffered except for one.

    Advice to Management

    There has been recent change in management. At the very least listen to those who have survived the last couple years of being set up to fail. You might be surprised

  3. "Best work place ever!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Accounts Receivable Specialist in Cincinnati, OH
    Current Employee - Accounts Receivable Specialist in Cincinnati, OH
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Trivantis full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    I work with a wonderful group of people that I consider family. We work hard together to make sure our customers come first. Great location , Fun environment!

    Cons

    I don't particular have any Cons about Trivantis!

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the GOOD work!!


  4. "Great atmosphere, great product"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Trivantis full-time

    Pros

    Employees are devoted, strong new parent company, job stability, good compensation and benefits, incredibly supportive management

    Cons

    Traffic leaving downtown can be frustrating


  5. "Great place"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Trivantis full-time

    Pros

    Great place to work, people are great

    Cons

    need more employees to meet the demands of the product


  6. "Products are Great"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Trivantis full-time

    Pros

    I've been working for Trivantis for more than 5 years. I feel that our products are extremely useful for the eLearning space and are easy to use. We put a lot of time and effort into figuring out what our customers need and providing them solid solutions. Customers always come first.

    The work environment in the Florida office is friendly and relaxed, but we work hard to accomplish our work goals. Most of us routinely put in much more than 40 hours a week and I believe we do it because we all like each other, personally and professionally.

    I have been lucky enough to move around from product to product. I enjoy this, so it hasn't been an issue for me. Many of the employees have been working on the same product for years, but I believe that this is their choice. I do believe that management does offer opportunities and listens to what the employees want to do, rather than forcing change when it is not desired.

    Cons

    The only real 'downside' to working for Trivantis is the lack of raises/promotions for the last several years. Unfortunately, we went through a period of time with our former CEO, which left the company in less than desirable financial shape. Our "new" CEO has done a decent job of turning the company around financially and we're hopeful that we may see some monetary gains for ourselves.

    Advice to Management

    Now that the company has turned a corner for the better, it would be nice to reward your employees for their hard work. I know I'd like a raise!


  7. "Senior Software Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Boca Raton, FL
    Current Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Boca Raton, FL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Trivantis full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    I feel it is a great environment for developers. I have the ability to influence and contribute on a high level because it's a small company. Fellow employees are knowledgeable and helpful. The products are a lot of fun to work on and they are industry leading. I like that there are opportunities to work in different products or to develop different features. Senior management changed (2016) for the better and it seems like things are going a lot better now.

    Cons

    Right before and after releasing product updates the work hours increase a lot. That is expected for product development. Pay and benefits are average, no stock options or 401k currently.

    Advice to Management

    Focus on making existing products the best they can be. Continue to be prudent with company funds so we can continue doing what we love (developing software).

  8. "Long established leader in the eLearning Software space"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager
    Current Employee - Manager
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Trivantis full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Stability - company has been in business for over 17 years
    Employees - most employees are long tenured. The culture favors nice, competent people
    Product - Lectora, in particular, is a leader in the space and has won awards consistently
    Customers - advocates love the company and its products and are highly active in its online community

    Cons

    Prior management made some poor choices regarding companies / products acquired that did not have much in the way of a positive impact, for the company, employees and customers.


  9. Helpful (1)

    "Inconsistent Goals, Demanding Managers"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Cincinnati, OH
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Cincinnati, OH
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Trivantis full-time

    Pros

    You'll probably make a few friends while working at Trivantis- one of the best perks of the job. You can even make some good money if you're doing things right.

    Cons

    The managers use fear of retention as a motivator for reaching sales goals. Turnover of managers is something you should get used to, too. In the ever changing world of technology, Trivantis is falling behind the leaders of the industry. Unfortunately, the employees pay the price.

    Advice to Management

    Truly consider who is in the management roles and IF they should be there. Changes are needed if thise


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Imagine the people!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Trivantis full-time

    Pros

    LOCATION: What's not to like about downtown Cincy?

    Cons

    Where to begin?

    It's easy for a disgruntled employee to complain about a prior employer. It's also pretty easy to spot and, for that reason, easy to dismiss. But try not to waive this review aside merely because the goings-on of a small software company don't meet expectations.

    As with most, Trivantis is an employer that does things right and does things wrong. To be clear, the people you rub elbows with make the positive difference, not so much the policies and neither at all the leadership. If you are fortunate enough to have good colleagues in your section -- and I was -- then life makes sense. If the departments you coordinate with are professional and relaxed -- and most were -- then again, life makes sense. If you have an immediate boss who always has your back -- and I did -- then you are insulated from the lunacy and whimsy of corporate leadership. It's all about the people. My wake-up call was realizing my department chief brought some excellent strategies to the table for a failing company, but was hampered by the CEO. With this chief executive, it was unclear whether the needs of the company trumped personal agendas.

    It's all about the people.

    Consider a corporation where product sales and new accounts comprise the chief revenue stream, but each month feels like a toss-up between accounts lost and products sold. It's hard to know whether sales work less at selling new clients (desperately needed) or plucking the low-hanging fruit of renewals: paychecks appear either way. The in-fighting between departments over selling the software product vs. the SAAS offering, doesn't help.

    If you're in sales, it's a given that marketing is clueless and can't deliver qualified leads. Period. That's what you tell your boss to justify the low numbers reported to the CEO. And if you're in marketing, sales couldn't make a renewal unless IBM's decision-maker knocked on the door and asked for it. Where is the fault: bumbling marketers or clumsy sales? If you're in either department you're caught in the middle as directors argue. In the face of solid business intelligence that unarguably trends the flow of raw data, the CEO seems to fix the blame on the department less in favor (based on personality), instead of fixing the problem with the actual sales pipeline (based on data). What would it be like if the hard choices at the top were based on performance and analysis, not favoritism?

    It's all about the people.

    CEO turnover is a big deal. When the board goes to that trouble, they don't want answers or solutions: they want revenue. The incoming CEO is on the hook for it, and failure means she'll be hung out to dry -- not exactly a resume builder. While copywriters write, the help desk helps and software engineers knock out code for the next product release, the CEO's job is managing the whole shebang to make it profitable. For the proletariat, this managing "thing" can be educational, but we'll have to use our imaginations to grasp it.

    So imagine a workplace where you're told to relax: nobody will be fired just because the board brought on a new leader. Then, before the next monthly all-hands meeting, someone from IT is whacked. No announcement. No explanation. Quite unsettling. The we-will-not-fire-anybody terminations continue in a kind of hushed, funereal don't-ask-cuz-we-won't-tell atmosphere. More uneasiness. Due to perceived instability and two-faced standards, some leave of their own volition. You won't hear about those either. A passive-aggressive, non-spoken, palpable grudge is held against those who depart, and the only way to wield it is to take it out on those who remain.

    It gets better.

    Imagine you're on a weekly team call discussing the work "Joe" does, why it's necessary and why it's good, just to be informed, then and only then, "Joe" is no longer with the company. Was he fired? Did he land a better job? You'll have to get it from the grapevine, because management isn't talking. Imagine the professional chagrin and irritation you feel because the sole reason you were on the call, instead of working tasks, was to coordinate with... the departed. Imagine the company will take months to replace him, and meanwhile those vacated duties are doled out to the unqualified or to the over-burdened. Since you're never told who takes over, you waste a lot of time asking others who don't know either.

    It's all about the people.

    Imagine regularly putting in 40+ hours a week (salaried, of course) on the "big rush" project, only to be told marketing changed the plan, or leadership changed its mind, or the planets changed their alignment. Again. Imagine the satisfaction you must feel knowing your efforts for the week were, literally, wasted. But imagine how much better you'll feel next quarter knowing the cycle will repeat itself.

    Imagine experiencing all this as inflation eats your salary, because there are no annual merit increases.

    Welcome to Trivantis. Where imaginations soar!™

    You can't work hard enough to make a real difference: the disconnect between leadership and worker bee is just too large. You don't dare slack off: the company's financial footing is just too lean.

    It's a "Dilbert-space" where your boss says one thing and your boss's boss says another because the boss at the top can't be bothered to display solidarity and integrity. Words don't count, whims do. A responsive company would get its ducks in a row, but Trivantis would rather see its employees suffer the justifiable incongruities of mismanagement.

    If your position is deemed important, it's likely you'll be severely over-worked and under-appreciated for it. You'll be asked to sign a contract requiring a month's advance notice before leaving, yet they'll reserve the right to can you before tomorrow's coffee break. And when you announce you're leaving, you'll be shunned by management as the pariah you are, up to the very last day, because...

    It's all. About. The people.

    There are some good middle managers who -- you can tell -- don't agree with leadership but don't have any say about it. The company will burn 'em out. The latest round of layoffs and departures has only served to weaken Trivantis technically, not bolster it financially. Since workloads never lighten whenever "redundancies are pared," I hope the few good people who remain might soon find greener pastures elsewhere. That, or the corporate climate might do a needful one-eighty.

    Oops! Now MY imagination is soaring!

    Advice to Management

    Decisions have consequences. Between your two locations of Florida and Ohio, employee churn is greatest in Cincy, at HQ. Tells you all you need to know right there.


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