U.S. Soccer Federation Associate Reviews | Glassdoor

U.S. Soccer Federation Associate Reviews

Updated Nov 13, 2019

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3.4
60%
Recommend to a Friend
92%
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U.S. Soccer Federation Chief Executive Officer Dan Flynn (no image)
Dan Flynn
2 Ratings
  1. "Great Experience for Interns"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Associate in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation for less than a year

    Pros

    Although it's an internship, it is paid. It's also a great chance to network with different departments and travel to new places

    Cons

    There seems to be a disconnect between the executive/leadership and the rest of the employees on where the Federation should go and what their identity actually is.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-11-13
  2. Helpful (1)

    "Not a good place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Director 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Conections that you can find for later

    Cons

    Low pay for the amount of work, a lot of good candidates to upper positions get overlooked and mostly Americans only get those jobs, they don’t care about Hispanics and others

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-27
  3. Helpful (13)

    "Toxic Environment"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    -Mostly very nice people to work with (though most of my coworkers have since left)

    Cons

    - Laughable salary - Complete disconnect between upper management and entry-mid level employees - No emphasis on work/life balance - Very difficult to move up

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-17
  4. Helpful (10)

    "Avoid this job."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Development Academy Associate in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    There were definitely some cool things about the job. Some of the staff would play soccer together on Fridays during the lunch break. There were many cool people at the federation who were passionate about soccer and growing the game. Specifically as a Development Academy employee, traveling to tournaments around the country and working with youth athletes was also rewarding.

    Cons

    The cons of this position very much outweighed the pros. These cons mostly apply to the Development Academy as a department, not necessarily the whole company. I cannot speak for other departments. The way the position works, you are a full-time "associate" for six months, and then you are either offered a full-time coordinator position at the end of it, or you are not retained. Please be aware, the hiring staff sells the position like it is a glamorous career opportunity, but you will primarily be doing two things- answering hundreds of emails per day and answering phone calls. The department was preparing to offer me a full-time coordinator position, and I told them I would not accept it. The notes below are some thoughts I jotted down prior to leaving the position in 2018. 1. Culture -The culture is very toxic. There was an open floor plan but employees were discouraged from talking and often told to “Cut the chatter.” Other departments always remarked how silent the Academy was. Part of the role that is not advertised in the interview process was what the management called being "on-call." On the weekends, associates would take home the Academy cell phone, which the Academy hotline phone number forwarded to. When referees, coaches, or parents had questions during the weekend, they would call the hotline and the cell phone would ring. The associate was required to answer the phone regardless of the hour it rang. It wasn't uncommon to receive phone calls from 5:00am CT to 11:00pm CT, with some weekends topping out near 200 calls. When I first started, associates were not paid for this weekend work, and they still had to work the full 40 hr work-week (which was often more like 50-60hrs) on top of it. We also did not get paid for travel days initially. (Ex.- If you flew out to a tournament on a Monday, you would not get paid at all, meaning you did not receive your normal Monday wages because you were not in the office, even though you were traveling for work reasons.) We eventually had to take this to HR to get it changed. At showcases, the DA hires per diem event staff. Management constantly forgot the names of event operations staff members who had worked U.S. Soccer DA showcases for 5 plus years. The department seriously lacked diversity and female representation. People who spoke out on issues like this were labeled negative contagions. There were some very talented, hard-working people in the department right around when I started, and there was mass attrition of those people because no one wanted to work in the DA. This seems to be a trend at U.S. Soccer as a whole. The department was supposed to hire a full-time event coordinator, but instead of investing in a new employee they just loaded everything in the job description on to other employees' plates. They were already extremely overworked when they dumped the event responsibilities on them. The event coordinator position was not filled in the 6 months that I worked there. The Role -I think the associate role has good intentions but poor execution. The DA tries to keep associates in a box with no thought or care about their development, which is what the position really could be about. Instead of developing the associate, and finding a spot they could contribute to the betterment of the department, associates were delegated remedial tasks, primarily answering hundreds of emails and phone calls per day with little other impact on the decision-making in the department The coordinators above me advocated for associates to take on more specialized roles in the DA. Management rejected that. They never asked us what our interests were and didn't play to our strengths. (Employees who were really strong on the phone and not strong with computers were told in performance reviews they answer the phone too much. Management Management set the poor culture in the DA. Management said sexist, homophobic, vulgar, and unprofessional things in front of per diem staff. Event operations staff members actively avoid working events in which upper level management will have a strong presence. Takeaways The job made me (and my fellow associates) feel bitter about going to work and it didn't add much to my career development. While working here, I lost some of my love for soccer because it reminded me of the office. I am now working in a new position in soccer, and it is a complete 180 from the culture of the U.S. Soccer Development Academy. It was one of my best decisions to leave U.S. Soccer from a career and personal well-being standpoint.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-05-31

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