U.S. Soccer Federation Coordinator Reviews | Glassdoor

U.S. Soccer Federation Coordinator Reviews

Updated Jun 26, 2019

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1.8
31%
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0%
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U.S. Soccer Federation Chief Executive Officer Dan Flynn (no image)
Dan Flynn
5 Ratings
  1. "Great to work for"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Coordinator in Chicago, IL

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Support the development of the sport in the United States

    Cons

    Odd working space at Soccer House

    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-06
  2. Helpful (7)

    "Great Experience In Spite of Lacking Culture"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    - Passion for the game. You're working at U.S. Soccer and striving to make soccer the preeminent sport in the country, so it was always soccer everything. Watching games in the office and playing soccer on Friday afternoons were great experiences and well-deserved breaks during the long days. - Incredible people. There were so many fun, intelligent people working at the Federation during my time there, especially at the coordinator-level positions. It was always refreshing seeing everyone's faces each day, and I learned so many invaluable skills from each of them. They also made the cons (see below) more bearable. - Direct management. My direct supervisor was incredible and enabled me to develop into the person I am today. Despite the intense work loads and long hours, I am confident in saying that some of the managers were some of the best I'll ever have encounter in my career. - Motivation and care. In retrospect, it is clear that the staff and management care so much about the organization. Everyone from marketing to DA to events put 110% effort in, and you really don't see that everyone you go. Having that influence around you is sensationally motivating to always be your best. - Perks. Meeting former players and coaches, getting to watch international games, Nike swag, etc. were all pretty sweet add-ons (but should NOT be a primary reason to take the job!). Overall, landing a job at U.S. Soccer was a dream come true, and I'm forever grateful for the experience, hence the three-star review (which may be a tad generous). However, the cons continued to outweigh the pros over time, created a toxic environment where everyone was dissatisfied, frustrated, over-worked, and under-paid.

    Cons

    Where to begin... - Compensation. Like other reviews have noted, employees at USSF are grossly exploited and under-paid for their efforts. You understand what you're doing when accepting a role there (or in sports in general) as salaries are very meager, but it never really gets better. I can't assume what the salaries are for the manager and director-level positions, but the coordinators were all severely under-paid -- hence why many talented individuals left. The Federation consistently touted its major $100M in reserves, and everyone was flabbergasted as to why the salaries remained so low. And do not even get me started on the "Associate Program." Call a spade a spade: it's an internship program that does not even cover a livable wage (it was like $10 an hour, excluding overtime, weekend work, etc. -- read the other reviews) for college graduates moving across the country for a six-month role without any future guarantees. That's pretty disgusting, especially considering the caliber of some of those employees (one in particular had a graduate degree, another with 5+ years of soccer work experience). - Work/life balance. We regularly worked 8am-5pm (more depending on dept), and employees were looked down upon for arriving any bit late or leaving early. Many employees felt the need to stay later to fulfill duties that hadn't reallocated with new hires. Fortunately, I was able to automate some processes and save myself some time, but that only meant that I wasn't as busy and therefore needed more work -- despite the fact that others worked at half the pace. Of course, that was hardly reflected in end-of-year reviews. After work trips (either over weekends or spanning weeks at a time), comp time was never awarded, and employees were not given any flexibility to work from home for a bit of recovery. Call me immoral, but I even feigned sick one day because I was so physically and emotionally drained...but I still had so much to do that I barely got to relax throughout the day. Working 16 hours days for 10+ consecutive days for that salary is brutal enough, but then taking the first flight out the following day and being required to get right to the office is insane and certainly doesn't build morale. - Upward mobility. Spoiler alert: there really isn't any. During my experience, I think I may saw one person promoted internally, and even that didn't really change his/her responsibilities (it was also universally regarded as a terrible decision, but who am I to say. During an employee review, this person was on his/her phone and laptop the entire time...there was no care for the employees performance or feedback). Even in the few situations in which talent is promoted from within, the minimal salary increase pales in comparison to the upgraded responsibilities and time requirements. You'll notice the trend that most manager and director-level employees have been with the Federation for 10+ years and that there are very few who have stuck around past 2-3 years...even HR noticed this trend and didn't do anything about it. - Upper management. Personally, I actually really like Jay Berhalter. He has a hard exterior, but he's a genuinely nice person who cares. Unfortunately, however, that compassion doesn't translate to the front lines, and that's painfully evident when reading these reviews. If only 1 out of 10 employees feels that way, then something is clearly wrong. I seldom saw our CEO and doubt he knew my name, and there were never enough open dialogues with the staff. One review points out an organizational meeting that left everyone entirely deflated after they bashed our feedback instead of saying our goal was to win a World Cup. First, this is 100% accurate, although grabbing a few beers afterwards and forgetting about it helped. Second, that's not our gripe at the front-lines; we wanted better communication, balance, and leadership. Also, despite my best efforts, I'm not playing as a striker for the WNT, so not sure how much I can really affect that goal. If you want some great experience and getting U.S. Soccer on your resume in exchange for a few years of the Federation taking advantage of you, absolutely go for it. Otherwise, steer clear of the "work for the crest" nonsense.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-25
  3. Helpful (19)

    "Something needs to change"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Coordinator 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Working for the National Teams, seeing the inside workings of a sports organization. Great benefits package. Great networking and work environment among Coordinators and Managers.

    Cons

    I worked for the Federation for nearly four years. During my time there I wore many hats, working for USSF, NWSL, NWSL Media, COPA 2016, COPA Marketing Inc. While working simultaneously for all four organizations at a time I received only my USSF salary and company wide bonuses, which was nothing when considering the success of the organization, being located in Chicago, and job requirements, but I stuck it out being promised time and time again, "you'll get a good bonus", I received a small bonus for COPA, maybe 1% of what the CEO and COO received, and that was it, nothing for my other roles in the organization, not even recognition. I was one of many employees who wore many hats, and never saw any praise or compensation for going above and beyond our jobs. During that tournament one employee, who is a favorite of the CEO, received compensation from both entities and a hefty bonus, during that time their work was strictly focused on the tournament and the federation was forgotten. I understand that people do a lot of work behind the scenes, but this kind of favoritism has no place in the work place, if you weren't in with the COO you were an outcast, and do not expect to see any movement within the company or see any compensation for all the work you do. Coming in early, staying late, working weekends and holidays were expected if needed, but ask to leave the office before 5pm and your will forever be looked down upon by the CEO and COO as they hawk at the parking lot seeing who leaves when. After being there two years, we decided to do a company outing and break out into groups to see what will help the organization, after the groups met, one person was sent to present the groups decisions. Every single group stated that the lack of communication between departments is a problem, so clearly everyone was onto something, and feeling like something had been accomplished. The CEO then proceeded to take the stage and say something along the lines of, I'm sad to hear no one mentioned the NWSL league and its success, winning a world cup, oh, and the communication thing is bull****. Meeting deflated, everything that was productive shot down by the person we are supposed to follow behind. How do you follow someone who will not take opinions into consideration from his own staff.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-14
  4. Helpful (4)

    "So Disappointing"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Program Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Being part of a group of individuals who shared a common passion for the game; going to incredible, memorable matches; international travel; Nike swag; pick up soccer games at lunch on Fridays

    Cons

    Leadership takes advantage of people's love for the game. Instead of valuing their extremely hard working, dedicated and passionate employees, they have created an environment that screams "you are lucky to work here, and you are replaceable" so we can over work you, pay you nothing, and if you complain, you're just not "cut out to work in sports." You will work weekends regularly, with not an hour of comp time during the week. There were times I worked more than 3 weeks straight without a day off or any over time pay. You will make minimum wage living in Chicago. There is no room for advancement because the people in higher up positions never leave. Over time, the extremely poor culture and lack of appreciation makes employees bitter and drives them to leave even when they love the work they do.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-26
  5. Helpful (13)

    "Don’t do it"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    anything/everything soccer. If you're passionate about the sport, there are some really cool perks and benefits that come with it such as playing pickup on fridays, working national team games, national academy tournaments, nike discounts, etc. - the cool stuff that makes any soccer fan excited to be part of but those type of events only happen once every 2 months or so, and thats if you're part of the travel staff. Good 401k with 3% match regardless if you contribute. Good health benefits. They started an HR department in 2017 (crazy to think there wasn’t one previously) which made a little progress but seemed like majority of focus was on cleaning up hiring process, off boarding, and a few fun all staff things like BBQs and a very fun annual footgolf tournament. They offer a shuttle van that fits 10-12 people to get to the Roosevelt CTA station and Metra stations a little after 5pm but its usually taken by all the associates as they can't work more than 40 hours. Very helpful for those who live in suburbs and take the train in. Also picks up in the morning hours.

    Cons

    Strict 8-5 office schedule but then you're frowned upon for leaving at 5pm. If you aren't working from home on nights and weekends or staying late, you won't fulfill your work and they'll make sure you hear it. Coordinator/Manager salaries are pretty low for the sports industry in relation to responsibilities in other sports roles with same title. Very little opportunity to increase your salary, even with a promotion. Sponsor friendly (nike, powerade, coke and others) rule is more than understandable but some take it way too seriously. Office environment - very unique office space in a south loop neighborhood but USSF has outgrown it. Mainly all open work spaces with a few small offices for meetings and private phone calls, 1 small kitchen with a table and 4 chairs, not enough bathrooms, and 10 or so parking spaces. Has a few showers for those who bike to work in morning or go for a run at lunch which is nice to have. No central air so there are loud window units throughout the office in the summer to keep it. Soccer House is 2 very old mansions which is a cool place but doubt its the best for work efficiency which may be one of the reasons why half of the staff work 10 hour days in the office and 12+ hour days out of the office. Turnover rate is a huge issue. They keep pushing growth and investment in staffing but its just a revolving door and constantly have key roles open for months to a year at a time. The only real increase in staffing has been at the coaching education facility in Kansas and the Associates Program (minimum wage internship). All of this while sitting on a $150 million surplus and giving out ridiculous salaries and bonuses to executives according to their top 10 highest paid employees which is public information as a nonprofit.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-04
  6. Helpful (2)

    "Recent Negative Reviews (June 2019) are spot on. NYT Article nicely summarizes toxic culture at USSF."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Coordinator 

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Health insurance is comprehensive, Nike discount is nice but other than that... nothing comes to mind.

    Cons

    No upward mobility unless you are a favorite of the two executives that control everything. Terrible pay, long hours, culture is one of fear and silence, no flexibility on hours or working from home. The idea that 'working for the crest' should be good enough is abused. Cannot be overstated how immense the turnover is and the number of talented people that have left because of the culture at the Federation, and it all stems from the current leadership (namely Berhalter and Flynn).

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-25
  7. Helpful (12)

    "Intervention needed"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    • Many employees get the opportunity to travel often for work and organize soccer events on a grand scale (National Team games, major youth soccer tournaments). • Working for U.S. Soccer allows for some wonderful networking opportunities in sports business or professional/youth soccer. • All staff have access to partner discounts from Nike and the U.S. Soccer Store. • The health benefits (medical, vision, dental) are very good especially within the sports industry. • U.S. Soccer operates under “Dress for the Day,” a pretty casual dress code and work environment. • Some incredibly talented and driven people work at U.S. Soccer because of their passion for the game in the United States. Working with those people is inspiring and one of the reasons that many staff choose to stay.

    Cons

    U.S. Soccer has a people epidemic. In my time working at the organization, I have seen employees leave at a brutal rate. This is due to poor management, lack of opportunity for advancement, and a culture where employees are overworked, underpaid, and under appreciated. • Management: Managers of people are never taught how to be proper managers. For a group of many former coaches I have been appalled by how poorly trained many of the leaders are in management and talent development. Across the board there is a lack of empathy, understanding, and genuine interest in employee growth at the company from supervisors (Managers and above). There is a huge discrepancy in leadership between departments and the few that have great managers produce very different experiences. • Compensation: U.S. Soccer insists that their salaries are “market average” but does not disclose the research behind that claim. If the organization is aspiring to make soccer the preeminent sport in the United States, they will need to provide compensation that is above average for all employees, not just those at the top. It seems that the organization is unwilling to pay the cost of acquiring and retaining top talent. • Turnover: There seems to be very few coordinators who are not looking for other jobs. It takes 3+ years of working beyond the scope of what you were hired for in order to be recognized in any way and often not even then. Most Coordinators and Managers are forced to take on additional work as staff continue to leave, with no promise of filling vacated positions. The additional work is an expectation — there is no compensation, merit points, or even a pat on the back for that work. • Associate Program: Most departments use Associates to fill gaps where they should have full time staff. Because of this, Associates are often doing the work of a Coordinator at minimum wage. When Associates leave U.S. Soccer most of them have a negative opinion of the Federation because they have seen the organization fail to provide jobs for high potential candidates even when it’s obvious a department needs more full time staff. • Office Environment: U.S. Soccer is based out of Soccer House, which consists of two old mansions in South Loop. The building has been under renovation for years; parts of it are safe and clean, usually the Executive and front-facing areas. Other employees work in basements and cramped “open-concept” spaces where wires are hazards and construction is common. If you drive to the office, there are exactly 13 parking spots for around 150 staff (not all drive) that are filled on a first come, first served basis. If you don’t get one of those spots, you have to search for limited free street spots or pay to park nearby. There is also a free shuttle for staff that goes to the Roosevelt and Union train stations, but again it is limited to the first 11 people to get in. • Travel: Many employees at U.S. Soccer have to travel often, on weekends and holidays. When they do travel, they can work in excess of 12-hour days. The amount of comp time they get is dependent on their manager, and many do not give out comp time except in extreme circumstances. It is common for managers to ask employees to come straight into the office after flying back from trips that last a week or more.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-02

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