U.S. Soccer Federation Reviews | Glassdoor

U.S. Soccer Federation Reviews

Updated Feb 9, 2020

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2.7
33%
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U.S. Soccer Federation Chief Executive Officer Dan Flynn (no image)
Dan Flynn
15 Ratings
  1. Helpful (1)

    "Not a good place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Director 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Conections that you can find for later

    Cons

    Low pay for the amount of work, a lot of good candidates to upper positions get overlooked and mostly Americans only get those jobs, they don’t care about Hispanics and others

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-27
  2. Helpful (2)

    "Recent Negative Reviews (June 2019) are spot on. NYT Article nicely summarizes toxic culture at USSF."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Coordinator 

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Health insurance is comprehensive, Nike discount is nice but other than that... nothing comes to mind.

    Cons

    No upward mobility unless you are a favorite of the two executives that control everything. Terrible pay, long hours, culture is one of fear and silence, no flexibility on hours or working from home. The idea that 'working for the crest' should be good enough is abused. Cannot be overstated how immense the turnover is and the number of talented people that have left because of the culture at the Federation, and it all stems from the current leadership (namely Berhalter and Flynn).

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-25
  3. Helpful (13)

    "Toxic Environment"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    -Mostly very nice people to work with (though most of my coworkers have since left)

    Cons

    - Laughable salary - Complete disconnect between upper management and entry-mid level employees - No emphasis on work/life balance - Very difficult to move up

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-17
  4. Helpful (12)

    "Intervention needed"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Coordinator in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    • Many employees get the opportunity to travel often for work and organize soccer events on a grand scale (National Team games, major youth soccer tournaments). • Working for U.S. Soccer allows for some wonderful networking opportunities in sports business or professional/youth soccer. • All staff have access to partner discounts from Nike and the U.S. Soccer Store. • The health benefits (medical, vision, dental) are very good especially within the sports industry. • U.S. Soccer operates under “Dress for the Day,” a pretty casual dress code and work environment. • Some incredibly talented and driven people work at U.S. Soccer because of their passion for the game in the United States. Working with those people is inspiring and one of the reasons that many staff choose to stay.

    Cons

    U.S. Soccer has a people epidemic. In my time working at the organization, I have seen employees leave at a brutal rate. This is due to poor management, lack of opportunity for advancement, and a culture where employees are overworked, underpaid, and under appreciated. • Management: Managers of people are never taught how to be proper managers. For a group of many former coaches I have been appalled by how poorly trained many of the leaders are in management and talent development. Across the board there is a lack of empathy, understanding, and genuine interest in employee growth at the company from supervisors (Managers and above). There is a huge discrepancy in leadership between departments and the few that have great managers produce very different experiences. • Compensation: U.S. Soccer insists that their salaries are “market average” but does not disclose the research behind that claim. If the organization is aspiring to make soccer the preeminent sport in the United States, they will need to provide compensation that is above average for all employees, not just those at the top. It seems that the organization is unwilling to pay the cost of acquiring and retaining top talent. • Turnover: There seems to be very few coordinators who are not looking for other jobs. It takes 3+ years of working beyond the scope of what you were hired for in order to be recognized in any way and often not even then. Most Coordinators and Managers are forced to take on additional work as staff continue to leave, with no promise of filling vacated positions. The additional work is an expectation — there is no compensation, merit points, or even a pat on the back for that work. • Associate Program: Most departments use Associates to fill gaps where they should have full time staff. Because of this, Associates are often doing the work of a Coordinator at minimum wage. When Associates leave U.S. Soccer most of them have a negative opinion of the Federation because they have seen the organization fail to provide jobs for high potential candidates even when it’s obvious a department needs more full time staff. • Office Environment: U.S. Soccer is based out of Soccer House, which consists of two old mansions in South Loop. The building has been under renovation for years; parts of it are safe and clean, usually the Executive and front-facing areas. Other employees work in basements and cramped “open-concept” spaces where wires are hazards and construction is common. If you drive to the office, there are exactly 13 parking spots for around 150 staff (not all drive) that are filled on a first come, first served basis. If you don’t get one of those spots, you have to search for limited free street spots or pay to park nearby. There is also a free shuttle for staff that goes to the Roosevelt and Union train stations, but again it is limited to the first 11 people to get in. • Travel: Many employees at U.S. Soccer have to travel often, on weekends and holidays. When they do travel, they can work in excess of 12-hour days. The amount of comp time they get is dependent on their manager, and many do not give out comp time except in extreme circumstances. It is common for managers to ask employees to come straight into the office after flying back from trips that last a week or more.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-06-02
  5. Helpful (10)

    "Avoid this job."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Development Academy Associate in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    There were definitely some cool things about the job. Some of the staff would play soccer together on Fridays during the lunch break. There were many cool people at the federation who were passionate about soccer and growing the game. Specifically as a Development Academy employee, traveling to tournaments around the country and working with youth athletes was also rewarding.

    Cons

    The cons of this position very much outweighed the pros. These cons mostly apply to the Development Academy as a department, not necessarily the whole company. I cannot speak for other departments. The way the position works, you are a full-time "associate" for six months, and then you are either offered a full-time coordinator position at the end of it, or you are not retained. Please be aware, the hiring staff sells the position like it is a glamorous career opportunity, but you will primarily be doing two things- answering hundreds of emails per day and answering phone calls. The department was preparing to offer me a full-time coordinator position, and I told them I would not accept it. The notes below are some thoughts I jotted down prior to leaving the position in 2018. 1. Culture -The culture is very toxic. There was an open floor plan but employees were discouraged from talking and often told to “Cut the chatter.” Other departments always remarked how silent the Academy was. Part of the role that is not advertised in the interview process was what the management called being "on-call." On the weekends, associates would take home the Academy cell phone, which the Academy hotline phone number forwarded to. When referees, coaches, or parents had questions during the weekend, they would call the hotline and the cell phone would ring. The associate was required to answer the phone regardless of the hour it rang. It wasn't uncommon to receive phone calls from 5:00am CT to 11:00pm CT, with some weekends topping out near 200 calls. When I first started, associates were not paid for this weekend work, and they still had to work the full 40 hr work-week (which was often more like 50-60hrs) on top of it. We also did not get paid for travel days initially. (Ex.- If you flew out to a tournament on a Monday, you would not get paid at all, meaning you did not receive your normal Monday wages because you were not in the office, even though you were traveling for work reasons.) We eventually had to take this to HR to get it changed. At showcases, the DA hires per diem event staff. Management constantly forgot the names of event operations staff members who had worked U.S. Soccer DA showcases for 5 plus years. The department seriously lacked diversity and female representation. People who spoke out on issues like this were labeled negative contagions. There were some very talented, hard-working people in the department right around when I started, and there was mass attrition of those people because no one wanted to work in the DA. This seems to be a trend at U.S. Soccer as a whole. The department was supposed to hire a full-time event coordinator, but instead of investing in a new employee they just loaded everything in the job description on to other employees' plates. They were already extremely overworked when they dumped the event responsibilities on them. The event coordinator position was not filled in the 6 months that I worked there. The Role -I think the associate role has good intentions but poor execution. The DA tries to keep associates in a box with no thought or care about their development, which is what the position really could be about. Instead of developing the associate, and finding a spot they could contribute to the betterment of the department, associates were delegated remedial tasks, primarily answering hundreds of emails and phone calls per day with little other impact on the decision-making in the department The coordinators above me advocated for associates to take on more specialized roles in the DA. Management rejected that. They never asked us what our interests were and didn't play to our strengths. (Employees who were really strong on the phone and not strong with computers were told in performance reviews they answer the phone too much. Management Management set the poor culture in the DA. Management said sexist, homophobic, vulgar, and unprofessional things in front of per diem staff. Event operations staff members actively avoid working events in which upper level management will have a strong presence. Takeaways The job made me (and my fellow associates) feel bitter about going to work and it didn't add much to my career development. While working here, I lost some of my love for soccer because it reminded me of the office. I am now working in a new position in soccer, and it is a complete 180 from the culture of the U.S. Soccer Development Academy. It was one of my best decisions to leave U.S. Soccer from a career and personal well-being standpoint.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-05-31
  6. "Great Experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Intern 

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time

    Pros

    Playing Soccer On Fridays Fantastic for Networking

    Cons

    Very Corporate Lack of Space

    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-03-12
  7. "K"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Jacksonville, FL

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation part-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Fun work enviornment, happy staff

    Cons

    Old fashioned, many old leaders

    U.S. Soccer Federation2019-01-14
  8. "Grade 7 Referee"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL

    I have been working at U.S. Soccer Federation part-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    love the sport of soccer

    Cons

    verbal abuse of parents, coaches, and fans

    U.S. Soccer Federation2018-06-18
  9. Helpful (4)

    "Great culture, low pay"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 

    I worked at U.S. Soccer Federation part-time

    Pros

    If you love soccer, this is a great job and will expose you to the most elite soccer program in the states.

    Cons

    Pay is well below average. As much as I love soccer, my paycheck wasn't even close to enough to pay the bills.

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    U.S. Soccer Federation2018-04-16
  10. "associate"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 

    I have been working at U.S. Soccer Federation full-time

    Pros

    It is cool to be associate with the Federation

    Cons

    There is no room for movement.

    U.S. Soccer Federation2018-02-09
Found 45 reviews