US Navy Reviews | Glassdoor

US Navy Reviews

Updated September 20, 2017
542 reviews

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US Navy Acting Secretary Sean Stackley
Sean Stackley
2 Ratings

542 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Extremely poor quality of life, some perks"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Jacksonville, FL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Jacksonville, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at US Navy full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    There are small communities within the Navy that are awesome, and larger communities that still over a decent quality of life.
    GI Bill is an amazing benefit.
    Pay is decent when you factor in the reduced costs.

    Cons

    Extremely Rigid- You are locked into what and wherever the system sends you, with little control and with little regard for your actual skills or abilities.
    Culture is often backwards, at least in the surface fleet. Bad practices, unsafe conditions, lack of regulation or oversight in critical areas. Extreme resistance to change.
    Exceptional thinkers and workers are treated the same the same as everyone else, lazy people are treated the same as everyone else unless they really screw up.
    Most leaders have no actual training on leadership, and just copy bad practices from above.
    Technical knowledge is plummeting as comptent people continue to get out.

    Advice to Management

    Treat people with respect, allow for some semblance of work life balance and seek actual input from junior people and don't punish people for trying to improve processes or make things better for their coworkers.


  2. "Interesting experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Aviation Electronics Technician in San Diego, CA
    Current Employee - Aviation Electronics Technician in San Diego, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at US Navy full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Working on aircraft and gain experience to help me out in the civilian world is nice.

    Cons

    People. Being even an average looking female, there is constant harassment and married people trying to flirt when you're wanting to do your job. And no real way anyone gets punished for inappropriate conduct at work unless they actually commit an assault

    Advice to Management

    Find better ways to deal with harassment

  3. "seaman"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at US Navy full-time

    Pros

    traveling the world was a big plus.

    Cons

    being away from family was a con.


  4. "mma"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at US Navy full-time

    Pros

    pay is really good here

    Cons

    underway really suck a whole lot


  5. "Human Resource Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Human Resources Manager in Smithfield, VA
    Current Employee - Human Resources Manager in Smithfield, VA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at US Navy full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Advancement opportunities are great. Benifits can't be beat.

    Cons

    The work, home life balance can be hard to manage.

    Advice to Management

    Let your junior leaders lead.


  6. "Special Education Instructor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Special Education Teacher in San Diego, CA
    Former Employee - Special Education Teacher in San Diego, CA

    I worked at US Navy full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Got to train as a Special Education Instructor in San Diego and had time after work to pursue MBA in Health Care Administration. Navy helped pay a minimal percentage of education, but I had a large loan that took years to payoff.

    Cons

    Harassment towards females was rampant. Received three month early out notice for convenience of government with no assistance for transition to civilian life.


  7. "Submariner. >100 hours/week far too often"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Nuclear Electricians Mate Navy
    Current Employee - Nuclear Electricians Mate Navy

    I have been working at US Navy full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    As an E-5 submarine nuclear electrician, the bonds with my coworkers have been like no other job I've had. We would do just about anything to take care of each other. That said, we're so close because of the hell that we're put through.
    The benefits and pay are solid for someone with no experience/college drop-outs.

    Cons

    Hours. Underway: 14-21 hour days no weekends on 4 of my 5 patrols. Refit: 14-18 hours days are pretty standard. Throw in overnight stays every now and then to spice it up (work a full day after being on the boat for 24 hours). Your sleep or sanity will not be respected. Off-crew: not worth the rest of the stress.
    No one else is available to do the work. You'd better be ready to step up, learn, and perform no matter what. No sick days.
    Very high divorce and suicide rates for a reason.

    Advice to Management

    Don't demand that we act like adults of the highest standard and a minute later treat us like children.

  8. "Financial Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at US Navy full-time

    Pros

    Job security with good benefits.

    Cons

    Limited ability to learn new skills or suggest improvements to processes and procedures.

    Advice to Management

    Get rid of the "we've always done it this way" mentality and embrace change!


  9. "Not bad to start your life. Do college while you're in!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at US Navy full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great experiences, ports, if you're a good worker and half-smart, you'll do great.

    Cons

    People can't get fired. This promotes laziness and doing the minimum.

    Advice to Management

    Train your new guys. You depend on them.


  10. "The United States Navy should win an award for most toxic work environment"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at US Navy full-time

    Pros

    Easy Advancement - As long as you can retain information and brown nose, you'll make rank. If you don't, either somethings wrong or you're keeping it real.

    Benefits - These don't really help you until you're out, but the Post 9/11 Gi Bill is a great thing. (In boot camp they will try to sell the Montgomery as better; don't do it! They do this because you have to pay into the Montgomery GI bill but you don't have to for the Post 9/11. If you plan on attending school full time after discharge, the Post 9/11 is the only logical choice. For vocations and part time school, Montgomery could work for some.). VA home loans also give you such an advantage when it comes to acquiring assets, so that's a huge plus.

    Huge variety of jobs to choose from - If you have a good ASVAB score, the possibilities are endless. From your basic work as a deckhand (BM) to working as an Information Technology Specialist (IT), you can find something that you might be interested in.

    Easy to start - Before I enlisted, I had a harder time getting a job at McDonalds than getting into the Navy. As long as you're healthy, don't have a crazy criminal record (a large portion of people I worked with had waivers for their records), and can score higher than a 50 on the ASVAB, you're in. From there on you don't need to think because you just do as you're told. In fact, thinking will probably get you in trouble!

    Cons

    Recruiter Lies - The obvious one, but from the second you start talking to a recruiter, you need to realize they are nothing more than a salesman. Anything that is suggested to you by a recruiter will be in the interest of the Navy, not you.
         Example: I scored a 96 on my ASVAB, qualifying me for pretty much any job. I let the recruiter know what I was interested in. He told me he'd try to get the job I wanted, but that there was no guarantee. When I went to MEPS, the only jobs I was offered were SECF (Submarine Electronics Computer Field), Machinist's Mate on a submarine, or "Nuke" (any job in the nuclear field). Nuke was pushed on me the most, and the reason for this is because recruiters receive a bonus for recruiting nukes. One nuke recruit is equivalent to two regular recruits for them. After they told me that this was all that they had, I told them that I wasn't going to join if that was all they offered me, as I specifically told them that I wasn't interested in anything like that before even going to MEPS.
         Immediately after I threatened to get out of the process, I was offered a few more jobs. Be firm with what you want! Do your own research!

    Living Conditions - If you're joining the Navy, obviously you need to be okay with spending time on a ship. I've met so many people while out to sea who told me "I never thought I'd get assigned to a ship! This sucks!" Well what did you expect? Get used to sleeping in a room with hundreds of other people, bumping elbows in the morning trying to get dressed with only about a square foot to yourself to stand in, and sleeping with your head 6 inches away from the bottom of the bed on top of you.

    Hours - While deployed, you'll work more than you would in any other jobs. 7 days a week, 12 hour days are the minimum. That's if you have a good job. If you get sent cranking (working food service), prepare to work under a bunch of people who don't care if they're breaking the law by not letting you get a proper 8 hours of sleep. On my ship, S2's chain of command wanted Sailors to come in at 0630 and had them working past 2200 most nights. Never mind the fact that this was extremely illogical, given the fact that the solution was simple: Split Sailors into two groups. Day shift (Lunch and Dinner) and Night Shift (Midrats and Breakfast). The division actually had to start a petition on my ship to get the chain of command's attention.

    Toxic Leadership - This is the root of most other problems. The chain of command effectively has control of your entire life, from the time you wake up in the morning to how much time you have to eat. Sure, there's regulations on things like these, but it's rare for anyone with any real power to observe what's going on at this level.
         Prepare to be threatened with Article 92 very often. This article allows punishment for disobeying a "lawful order." I put that into quotes, because just what constitutes a lawful order is extremely vague.
         If you think that you might be able to defend yourself in a court of law, well you're out of luck because the usual punishment is NJP (Non-judicial punishment). This means there is no jury. Whatever happens to you is solely the CO's decision. I've even seen the CO completely disregard his XO's suggestions. The CO has the power to recommend you for separation (under either a general or other than honorable discharge), assign you extra duty, restrict you to the ship, reduce your rating/rank, cut your pay, and more. The most common punishment I've seen involves 45 days of restriction to the ship, 45 days of extra duty (so after those 12+ hour days, get ready to do some more work!), reduction in rating, and half-months pay cut for 2 months. It's a package deal.
         The problem with trying to combat toxic leadership is the mindset of most Sailors. They have a mindset that prioritizes "manning up" and discourages bringing problems to light. This is constantly reinforced by leadership. When both your leaders and your peers aren't willing to help, it leaves a Sailor under duress powerless.
         People are encouraged to bottle up their problems and keep their mouths shut. You can see the results of this by comparing the military's suicide rates to the rest of the country. I've had multiple friends commit suicide in this job. I guarantee that 9/10 veterans know someone who has taken their life in the service.

    Advice to Management

    Stop treating your workers like property and start valuing them as people. Make the work environment less threatening and more democratic to allow people to improve their living conditions. A Sailor who doesn't like his leadership will not respect them either. He will work only out of fear of consequences, and this leads to the lowest possible level of productivity.

    This excerpt from Kurt Vonnegut, himself a World War II veteran, sums up my views on how the government treats their service members.
    "In case you haven’t noticed, we also dehumanize our own soldiers, not because of their religion or race, but because of their low social class.

    Send ’em anywhere. Make ’em do anything.

    Piece of cake."


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