Wargaming.net Reviews | Glassdoor

Wargaming.net Reviews

Updated October 16, 2017
152 reviews

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3.7
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Wargaming.net CEO owner Victor Kislyi
Victor Kislyi
76 Ratings

152 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Consequentially there is a very good work-life balance and lots of motivation within the studio (in 7 reviews)

  • World wide known projects, such as World of Tanks - you feel really making something big and important (in 7 reviews)

Cons
  • Many on the senior management team are looking up to keep their jobs (in 5 reviews)

  • salaire, work hours, shifts, work location (in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Featured Review

    Helpful (1)

    "Software Dev's take: great project management, work-life balance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Wargaming.net full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Well organized, properly staffed and supported software development environment. Full time project managers, QA teams, product owners, DevOps. You don't have to wear all of the hats which lets you focus on getting stuff done.

    Great benefits, compensation.

    Good track record of promoting from within.

    Game nights after work in the office (board and video). Charity events (24 gaming marathons).

    Cons

    True like 4 years ago, less so now: Timezone difference and language barriers with Minsk (where most of the engineering exists). It wasn't ever a show stopper, just slowed things down a little.

    Advice to Management

    Globally: Keep trusting the Chicago studio to do their own thing, they got it on lock down.


  2. Helpful (1)

    "Senior Software Engineer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Wargaming.net full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Wargaming is the kind of place that has both dedicated and hard working people with those same people being supportive and collaborative. Your ideas are very rarely (if ever) ignored and you are given the power to further your career path here if you choose to do so. It is an environment that is both fun and rewarding to work in which can be rare to find.

    Cons

    Never seems to be enough La Croix. However this may be a personal problem.

  3. Helpful (1)

    "Friendly, Casual, Task-Oriented, Focused on the Long-Term"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Studio GM in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Studio GM in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Wargaming.net full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    I'm definitely biased in my opinion, considering the position I'm in, but I've never been happier at a game studio than I am today at Wargaming Chicago-Baltimore. Why? Well:

    - Flexible hours with a strong emphasis on work-life balance - most people work very reasonable hours most of the time, and we purposely schedule in such a way as to avoid crunch. It only ever happens if something's gone really wrong (for example, a bunch of key people all out sick at the same time). But it's never assumed or scheduled. Plus, a lot of positions (not all) have some ability to work from home when someone needs to wait for a delivery or stay home with a sick kid, and our hours are fairly flexible.
    - Benefits and Perks - best-of-class maternity and paternity leave, great PTO and holidays calendar, 401K matching, medical/dental/vision/life/etc, all top notch.
    - Friendly people, always ready to give advice or just chat
    - Casual workplace - it's a game company, of course we're in shorts and t-shirts :)
    - Light on bureaucracy - we purposely try to stay very light on paperwork, avoid lots of email spam about stuff nobody cares about, keep things digital (paperless), and try to limit 'meeting hell' compared to anywhere else I've worked.
    Successful - the most important, we've been successful for years, have our sights set on an even bigger future for the studio and the company, and we try hard to make sure that success translates into continually improving our employee's experience and growth here at Wargaming.
    - Cutting-edge business model - all of our larger projects are free-to-play and free-to-win, which allows for the greatest possible number of players and a great experience for multiplayer (lots of potential opponents and clanmates, lots of chances to make new friends, good matchmaking, etc.).
    - Tools to succeed - we have modern facilities, modern equipment, great BI / analytics, and our teams don't lack for anything they need to get the job done.

    Cons

    Our company is a global company, and like most larger companies, that means that decisions sometimes have to go to someone far away. These things take time and are not as simple as a "water cooler chat" like in a 1-office studio. On the flip side, some of our folks enjoy getting to travel to new and interesting places :)

    Advice to Management

    Continue to allow our game studios to create their own, local culture, and work the way we want to work. The most valuable part of our company will always be the people, so let's never stop letting people be themselves.


  4. Helpful (1)

    "A great place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Wargaming.net full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - Sustainable work/life balance
    - Many highly skilled colleagues to with, bounce ideas off of, etc.
    - Being part of a successful game studio
    - Excellent benefits, e.g., paternity leave
    - Opportunities for cultural enrichment, working in a global company
    - Experienced leadership that has shipped many game titles
    - Clear articulation of the studio's priorities
    - Located close to major rail lines, easy commute

    Cons

    - Communication and responsibility gaps result from rapid growth
    - "NIH" syndrome occasionally present, due to growth, overlapping acquisitions of engineering talent
    - Like all game studios, opportunities for upward mobility can be somewhat limited, which may cause people to leave in order to advance their careers

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the good work on the pros, and continue to work towards minimizing the cons, particularly the upward mobility issue. It is a challenge for all game studios, but vital in terms of retaining the best people.


  5. "Byzantine bureaucratic procedures cripple critical technology"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Wargaming.net full-time

    Pros

    Wargaming is a booming business, and when it wants to throw money at a problem, it can throw a lot of money.

    Cons

    Every piece of technological infrastructure within the company is horribly mismanaged, by "owners" no one knows how to contact, in a configuration that isn't accessible to anyone, on hardware that can disappear at any moment. It's likely that a full day, each week, will be lost to a failure of X, Y, or Z critical backend.

    Every technology company has this problem in some severity, but Wargaming actively works against fixing it -- infrastructure ownership is tied directly to internal political power. A middle-manager will often sacrifice the reliability or quality of an important resource, and focus on his own fiefdom's pet project, instead.

    International communication problems also hold back internal development. A "team" may supposedly span the globe, but in reality only one office is in charge, and the rest are treated like untrusted offshore labor - their suggestions and issues ignored - and get blamed for the "real" team's mistakes.

    Wargaming's internal technology has problems that no engineer should have to deal with, and the people who can fix those problems refuse to do so.

    Advice to Management

    If you can't get your infrastructure groups to stop fighting with each other, fire them and outsource to IaaS instead. Your technology backbone is holding your developers back.


  6. Helpful (2)

    "Excellent, reliable studio"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Producer in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Producer in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Wargaming.net full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    As some other reviews have mentioned, there are many things that put Wargaming Chicago-Baltimore apart from other game dev shops. First, the lack of crunch. Sure, when bugs crop up or big features are slipping behind as a code lockdown approaches, there are folks who have to stay late. But the whole, "we're approaching ship date—we need you guys to come in for 10 hour days and work through the weekend" thing just doesn't happen here.

    Perhaps an even more important positive facet of WGCB is how stable the employment is. The games industry is incredibly volatile (I've been part of multiple full teams laid off due to poor budgeting/planning at other studios), but Wargaming strives to keep people employed. It's very nice to work at a place that doesn't treat people as a disposable means to the end of shipping a game.

    One final great thing about working here is the potential for personal career growth and mobility. I've worked my way up through multiple positions at the company, and each step of the way have had a great manager in whom to share my career aspirations. If you're willing to put in the work and make your career goals known to management (and be patient but politely persistent), there's a good chance opportunities will open up for you.

    Cons

    While being a truly global effort, the "mothership," Minsk office and much of the management flowing out of that main development operation are incredibly bureaucratic. There are departments and sub-departments, and enacting any kind of optimization or change to this apparent monolith is nearly impossible. There seems to constantly be an oscillation between "One team," utilizing sometimes suboptimal technical solutions vs. each team around the globe coming up with their own solutions, and this constant struggle can be a bit exhausting.

    Advice to Management

    Chicago-Baltimore: Keep doing your thing, and keep respecting and honoring your employees' aspirations.

    Upper management (Cyprus, Minsk): Be open to solutions outside of what's established. We have a lot of amazing teams around the world, and not all of the best ideas flow from a single place.


  7. Helpful (2)

    "Great Employer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Wargaming.net full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    If you work hard consistently, there's room to grow in the Chicago office. Other WG offices may hand out promotions more often, but they're not always deserved. Here, the quality of work you output really counts. Going "above and beyond" is noticed also!

    WG is global and has offices everywhere. Transfers and cross-office promotions happen every now and then so the career opportunities are existing and possible in some cases.

    The benefits are definitely good (match on 401k etc.). The office is super conveniently located as well, near public trans.

    There's employment stability here as well, which is not always the case in this industry. QA are full-time, non-contract employees with full benefits. None of this "6 months contract then we throw you out for a week and hire you back so we don't have to give you benefits" stuff here.

    Cons

    This is not a con per say, more of a warning - but this isn't the place for you if you don't plan on pulling your weight. This is not a place where you can watch Youtube for hours, put in minimal effort, and go home for very long. Good work ethics required.

  8. Helpful (3)

    "The games are a one hit wonder"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Developer in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Developer in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Wargaming.net full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Wargaming is a multi-cultural global company with offices around the world which is pretty cool as you get to communicate with your peers. You also get to sharpen your skill set. The benefits are also rather decent.

    Cons

    The company produces many games but only 1 is the money maker and it really is a 1 hit wonder. It is a very dated game that has just about reached its expiration date. The company has not been able to produce anything else of substance over the years. There is a heavy emphasis on the European Wargaming studios which leaves many of the US studios dealing with layoffs. It is not a fun environment. There is a lot of bickering, politics, and red tape. Honestly, a paper cut is more fun than working at Wargaming.

    Advice to Management

    Treat your employees better!


  9. Helpful (5)

    "Platform Team: World of Dilbert (resubmission)"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Devops Engineer in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Devops Engineer in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Wargaming.net full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    - 401k match; decent insurance; salary matches Seattle area
    - Commuter bonus of $125 a paycheck for not driving
    - Free snacks, food, alcohol
    - Challenging problems to solve (because of constraints/cons listed below)
    - new Bellevue office is right next to transit center, super convenient. downtown bellevue is very clean, has a beautiful park and lots of places to have lunch or happy hour at
    - Flexible work hours, (10-4 are "core hours") and relatively easygoing about work from home policy

    Cons

    There are many teams at Wargaming, so it's highly likely not all cons apply to all teams. This was my experience with the Platform team (called Seattle team, but is located in Bellevue office).

    - No one is held accountable. Accountability is washed away in the face of emergency.
    - Language/culture barrier... Google Translate only gets so far and not all documentation is professionally translated yet. Indirect vs. direct communication styles are not acknowledged and it leads to unbalanced expectations and a lot of anger against other teams
    - Development across two vastly different cultures, multiple programming languages and approaches to tech stacks, 10 hour difference in time zones, and 5+ softwares to communicate through, with little to no defined procedure = nothing works well and everything is unstable
    - Systematic attention to symptoms and never the root causes (from both technological and social point of view)
    - Middle management tries to re-invent the wheel of communication far, far too often instead of taking feedback from employees at face value... they make new guidelines and policies and proclaim them but never enforce them... strange expectation for everyone to "self organize" which leads to mass chaos and no sense of direction
    - Technical issues are only prioritized when there's a customer facing problem / break in production; preventative measures / investigations are not prioritized which leaves engineering team burnt out and on edge
    - Seattle team has barely any persuasion in the rest of the company. It is a struggle to get appropriate access to machines for troubleshooting or testing.
    - Because of resource issues a lot of fixing has to be done directly in production: reproducing issues / test cases is extremely time consuming and management prefers results over quality
    - I do more 'digital paperwork' than I do actual technical work. I would say only 10-25% of my technical prowess is utilized at this company.
    - Use of agile/scrum is too serious to the point of detriment. Leads to micro management. items sent to backlog are typically forgotten about. If you don't finish something in a sprint it's often assumed to "no longer be a problem", then there is again mass confusion when issues resurface
    - Managers often have no social skills or no managerial experience -- "team lead", "senior", and "manager" are conflated. Some people don't even want to do administrative type tasks but are forced to. leads to EXTREME resentment and imbalance of power/persuasion.
    - Sexism. Woman engineers are frequently talked over, need to defend themselves in unnecessary detail, are excluded from conversations, iced out from decision making, conference calls, business trips and etc. Obviously this is another cultural difference but that does not invalidate the impact on employees. Such a waste of talent. Other reviewers are spot on about this. Yes, these are all very subjective experiences but experiences nonetheless and I doubt it will ever change.
    - Little to no morale.
    - Rule by fear/shoot the messenger mentality. For example, we were discouraged from talking about bugs or making jokes in Slack because certain "higher ups" might see it. engineers not having safe place to vent frustrations kills motivation and passive aggressiveness is off the charts just like in Dilbert comics. Cute at first but gets old quickly.
    - Bad work/life balance is rewarded (e.g. 10+ hour work days, working on weekends) and implied that it is necessary at times but never explicitly requested.
    - Rampant nepotism, and favoritism... there's a lot of people who I wonder "what do they do exactly?"
    - Gossip, whispering, unclear promotion paths (if any)
    - Received a bonus, but ONLY after I complained about management problems, and there was no word of anyone else getting bonuses... leading me to believe they are trying to pacify me with money.

    I would suggest to only work here if you are completely out of options.

    Advice to Management

    - Respect your employees by listening to what they have to say. Don't treat them like disposable pawns. Hire managers that actually care about the well-being of the employees instead of using managers just to push narratives from upper management.

    - be more transparent (on both an individual and team wide basis) even if that means getting bad news

    - hire experienced managers who can set real, individual goals for employees outside of the b.s. corporate performance tracking... and follow up on it. people need direction and feedback desperately.

    - stop hiring friends/spouses or people who are not qualified in general. Throwing money and people at issues does not solve problems long term.

    - Stop discouraging honesty! Or, if the honesty is too much to handle, DO something about the root issues. engineers need a place to vent about the never ever ending dumpster fires, OR need permission to actually fix things. Quality vs quantity argument applies here. Can't have your cake and eat it too.

    - take more initiative in being inclusive.

    - acknowledge that there is a problem, validate employee concerns instead of hiding them or silencing with money.


  10. Helpful (1)

    "Low morale and tough environment"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Wargaming.net full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    1. Good health insurance
    2. Matching 401k
    3. Good PTO package
    4. Some nice people

    Cons

    1. Lots of red tape
    2. Contributions made by those in the US studios are not appreciated as much as those in the CIS regions
    3. Inexperienced managers
    4. Exec management needs a rehaul
    5. You work here to get some experience but I wouldn't advise staying here. There is no growth. This is bettered suited for those right out of college or those desperately unemployed and need a paycheck
    6. Low pay when compared to other software companies
    7. Morale is very low at Wargaming.

    Advice to Management

    Upper management needs a rehaul asap. Morale is very low that it makes it such a depressing work environment. Start investing in a new IP already.


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